Oklahoma City Thunder v Memphis Grizzlies - Game Six

Grizzlies add mental-endurance coach

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What do the Florida State and Alabama football teams have in common?

1. They’re the only programs to win national championships in the last three years.

2. They employeed Trevor Moawad.

The Memphis Grizzlies, trying to piggyback off that success, are emulating No. 2.

Grizzlies release:

The Grizzlies also added Trevor Moawad, a recognized expert in the field of mental conditioning who has led mental endurance programs for the University of Alabama and Florida State football teams, as mental endurance coach.

Moawad joins the Grizzlies organization to serve as mental endurance coach. Moawad has recently coached under Nick Saban at the University of Alabama and Jimbo Fisher at Florida State University, helping to guide and lead the development of the players off the field to ensure they are thinking at an elite level on the field. Through the integration of advanced mindset solutions, he has played a vital role in both schools winning NCAA Championships for their football programs in his tenure.

I wouldn’t assume Moawad’s presence and a championship share a causal relationship. Most likely, elite programs like Florida State and Alabama can afford many luxuries – including a coach focused on mental technique . But that’s just an example of many advantages, making it difficult to say which play the most direct roles in winning.

We’ll see how big an advantage is for the Grizzlies, but I think it helps. They’re not the first to use experts on gaining a mental edge, though I don’t know how common they are on staffs around the league as opposed to outside consults.

Under Lionel Hollins, Memphis always struck me as a team with a strong culture of mental toughness. Veterans like Zach Randolph, Marc Gasol, Mike Conley and Tony Allen help, and they’re still there, even with Hollins in Brooklyn. Might there be diminishing returns that don’t exist with a mentally weak team hiring Moawad?

But my only questions are about how large a positive this is. Moawad should help the Grizzlies, and his mere presence shows Robert Pera’s commitment to building a winner.

Want to know how specifically Moawad will help? Andy Staples of Sports Illustrated wrote a fascinating profile of him, including some examples of his techniques:

The exercise that helped Hightower understand why he needed to speak up during the Auburn game involves a group of players who are tasked with planning a barbecue. Each player wears a number on his head. He can’t see the number, but his teammates can. A one is the low man on the totem pole. A nine is an alpha dog. Moawad instructs the players to treat one another in accordance to the number on each person’s head. When the nine speaks, everyone listens and reacts. When the twos and threes speak, they are ignored. "You start to learn status," Moawad said. "The overall goal is learning where you fit in. At different times, you need to play different roles." Said left tackle Barrett Jones: "By the end, everyone clearly knew what number they were."

Coach Tom Coughlin wanted to know if the mental coaches could find a way to help tailback Fred Taylor — known at the time as "Fragile Fred" because he was so injury-prone — play a full season.

Then they went to work on Taylor. They surveyed the longest-tenured veterans on the Jaguars’ roster to determine what they did that Taylor did not. They discovered that all of the veterans came to work at about 6:30 a.m. Taylor showed up two hours later. They told Taylor he needed to begin showing up earlier. He asked what he needed to do during those two hours. Do what the veterans do, Moawad and Bohling told him. Taylor filled those two hours with training that helped him start 46 consecutive games between 2002 and 2004.

some players arrive on campus unable to look coaches and teammates in the eye. Moawad has a drill to fix that.

Find a friend and try this exercise.

You: OneFriend: TwoYou: ThreeFriend: OneYou: TwoFriend: Three

Pretty easy, right? Now replace each "one" with a clap and try again.

Awfully hard to do without maintaining solid eye contact, isn’t it? Now replace each "one" with a clap and each "three" with a finger snap.

It can’t be done without eye contact. Work that drill enough, and the shiest person can learn to look even the sternest authority figure in the eye.

Moawad also tries to help teammates communicate better with one another. Back when Jones played guard, he sat back-to-back with center William Vlachos. Vlachos had to describe a series of complex shapes on a card in his hand. Jones, without seeing the card, had to reproduce the shapes.

Moawad trains players to believe by changing their internal monologue. He said an athlete says 800-1,400 words a minute to himself on a subconscious level. Those words must be positive, and they also must be the correct words that allow the player to focus on the task at hand and not some distraction in another part of his life or on some external influence like, say, 100,000 screaming fans. Moawad often uses the example of sprinter Michael Johnson, who tried to limit his internal monologue to the same four phrases during a race.

1. Keep my head down2. Pump my arms3. Explode4. Think like a bullet

Moawad has a drill to keep players focused despite external distractions. First, he has a player attempt to find a sequence of numbers in ascending order. Second, he has the player complete the same task with a partner staring silently at his work. Third, the player must complete the task while his partner screams insults at him.

Report: Knicks waiving Brandon Jennings

NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 01:  Brandon Jennings #3 of the New York Knicks in action against the Brooklyn Nets during their game at the Barclays Center on February 1, 2017 in New York City.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)
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The Knicks made no deals prior to the trade deadline, causing Carmelo Anthony to question the team’s direction.

It’s as if Phil Jackson now just woke up and realized he could do something.

With the trade deadline passed, New York is waiving Brandon Jennings to sign Chasson Randle.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

This is a good move executed in seemingly the most ham-handed way possible.

The Knicks couldn’t have traded Jennings for a second-rounder last week? He’s on a one-year contract worth just $5 million, which should have made it easy to line up salaries. He’s overrated, because his flashy moments and presence in a big market dwarf erratic play overall. Still, for teams ready to win now that needed a backup point guard, Jennings could have added value.

And even if potential Jennings trades wouldn’t have cleared a roster spot, the Knicks could have waived Sasha Vujacic instead. Vujacic is washed up, but he’s a Jackson favorite.

Still, the Knicks are better off now. They open playing time for promising rookie Ron Baker and add the 24-year-old Randle, who shined in limited minutes with the 76ers earlier this season. New York has circled Randle since went undrafted out of Standford in 2015. He played for the Knicks in summer league and the preseason, but they cut him once he got hurt.

For a team headed back to the lottery, better to emphasize youth — though it would have been even better to do so before the trade deadline.

Jennings is also better off, likely to join a better team. I wouldn’t rule out the Nuggets or Jazz claiming him on waivers, but he most likely clears waivers and picks his next destination.

Three Things We Learned Sunday: Are we taking Westbrook’s destruction of NBA for granted?

Oklahoma City Thunder guard Russell Westbrook (0) dunks as New Orleans Pelicans guard Jrue Holiday (11) and forward Dante Cunningham (33) look on during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Oklahoma City, Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017. Oklahoma City won 118-110. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)
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Well, this was inevitable (just like the Steve Harvey jokes), but also damn funny.

Sunday around the NBA, everyone who earned a win was announced as such, here are the three big takeaways.

1) Have we started to take Russell Westbrook’s destruction of the league for granted? Sunday Russell Westbrook had 41 points, 11 rebounds, 11 assists — his fourth 40-point triple double of the season— and enough highlight plays to fill his own segment on SportsCenter. Yawn.

On the season he is averaging 31 points, 10.6 rebounds, and 10.3 assists per game, he’s very likely going to be the first player in five decades to average a triple-double over the course of a season. Whatever.

It seems like we’ve become numb to what Russell Westbrook is doing this season. He has 29 triple-doubles, he is carrying the Thunder to the playoffs (they are on pace to win 47 games). When he is on the court, the Thunder outscore their opponents by three points per 100 possessions, when he sits they get outscored by 10.5. Sunday against the Pelicans he scored 21 of his points in the fourth quarter when his team needed the buckets to get the win.

We can’t do that — we are never going to see another season like this. Westbrook has been nothing short of phenomenal. Does he occasionally hunt triple doubles? Sure, but he’s actually in the position to hunt them, and his team gets wins because of it. Is he turning the ball over more than coach Billy Donovan would like? Sure. It’s not like has the ball in his hands every time down and is the only reliable shot creator on the team… oh, wait, it’s exactly like that.

Step back and savor this. It’s a season for the ages.

2) The flip side of item No. 1: Pelicans lose again, DeMarcus Cousins picks up technical 32 seconds in and will miss next game. Since the trade that was going to turn their season around, the New Orleans Pelicans have lost three in a row — the latest Sunday to Westbrook and the Thunder — and slid farther out of the playoff picture in the West, 3.5 games back of Denver (they could make up the ground, but they need to leapfrog four teams now to do it). Cousins also picked up technical No. 18 just 32 seconds into the loss Sunday for a silly retaliation move on Steven Adams — meaning Cousins is suspended for the Pelicans upcoming game against the Pistons (after 16 techs you sit out for every other one).

New Orleans is not a playoff team, not this season. They aren’t turning this around fast enough. We knew it would take a little time for Cousins and Anthony Davis to mesh, and was painfully obvious in this game: Davis scored 24 in the first, Cousins zero; then in the second quarter it flipped and Cousins had 19 while Davis scored zero. At the end of the game Davis and Cousins combined for 69 points, the next highest Pelican player had 10. Cousins is putting up numbers — he has averaged 23.3 points and 13 rebounds per game since coming over — but the Pelicans are not a team yet. And may not be until next season.

3) Jusuf Nurkic is tougher than you — has two teeth knocked out, stays in game. We found out after the game they were two crowns, but still. Nurkic, a new Blazer since the trade deadline, fouled Toronto’s P.J. Tucker with a couple of hands to the back, but as they came down Tucker swung his arm and caught Nurkic in the face, knocking out some teeth/crowns (Tucker did get a technical for that).

The Raptors went on to win 112-106, behind 33 from DeMar DeRozan and a solid 18 and 10 from Serge Ibaka (who was key).

 

DeMar DeRozan powers Raptors past Trail Blazers, 112-106

BOSTON, MA - MARCH 23:  DeMar DeRozan #10 of the Toronto Raptors dribbles against the Boston Celtics  during the first quarter at TD Garden on March 23, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
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TORONTO (AP) DeMar DeRozan scored 33 points, Serge Ibaka added 18 and the Toronto Raptors beat the Portland Trail Blazers 112-106 on Sunday night.

The Raptors won their third in a row and wrapped up a second straight season sweep of Portland. They previously had beaten the Trail Blazers 95-91 in Portland on Dec. 26.

Damian Lillard scored 28 points for the Trail Blazers, who got 18 from Maurice Harkless.

Up 98-96 with 4:41 remaining, the Raptors scored the next six points, with back-to-back jump shots from Ibaka and a pair of free throws from DeRozan putting them up by eight with 3:16 remaining.

The Trail Blazers answered with six straight converted free throws sandwiched around a three-point play from Cory Joseph, before Lillard drove on Ibaka and converted the layup to cut the lead to 107-104 with 1:42 to play.

But DeRozan scored the next four points, hitting a jump shot and two free throws to put the Raptors up by seven with 30 seconds to play.

In a back-and-forth first quarter featuring 11 lead changes, Portland took control, overcoming 12 points from DeRozan to emerge with a 28-25 edge after 12 minutes.

Al-Farouq Aminu led the way for the Trail Blazers in the second with nine points as they extended their advantage to 12 points with 4:52 to play in the half. But the Raptors shot 61 percent in the period and went on a 15-2 run to close out the quarter and head into halftime lead 53-52.

Toronto scored the first six points of the third quarter to extend its lead, but Lillard had 10 points in the period to the Trail Blazers stay close. They retook the lead with 1:47 to play, before the Raptors surged back to enter the fourth up 82-80.

TIP-INS

Trail Blazers: G Evan Turner and C Festus Ezeli (left knee) did not play.

Raptors: G Kyle Lowry (right wrist) missed the game. Joseph made just his third start of the season in his place. . Toronto has now completed season sweeps against five teams this season (Brooklyn, Denver, Utah and the Los Angeles Lakers).

LACK OF LOWRY

Toronto coach Dwane Casey said Lowry’s sore right wrist was assessed over the weekend and it was still structurally sound.

“The images weren’t significant, there was no significant showing,” he said. “So it’s going to be day-to-day, treated symptomatically. Swelling’s gone down, so that’s a good sign. So we’ll see. He’ll be a day-to-day thing. It wasn’t broken, so that helps.”

UP NEXT

Trail Blazers: Visit Detroit on Tuesday looking to snap a three-game losing streak against the Pistons.

Raptors: Visit New York on Monday aiming for a sixth straight win over the Knicks.

Late 5-point possession lifts Celtics over Pistons 104-98

NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 15:  Jaylen Brown #7 of the Boston Celtics in action against the New York Knicks during the second half of their preseason game at Madison Square Garden on October 15, 2016 in New York City. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
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AUBURN HILLS, Mich. (AP) Jaylen Brown sank a 3-pointer from the right corner while being fouled with 37.6 seconds remaining, part of a five-point possession for Boston that lifted the Celtics to a 104-98 victory over the Detroit Pistons on Sunday night.

The Celtics were down 96-95 when Brown connected while being fouled by Marcus Morris. Brown missed the ensuing free throw, but Detroit couldn’t come up with the rebound, and Tobias Harris was called for a loose-ball foul. Marcus Smart added two free throws to put Boston up 100-96.

Isaiah Thomas led the Celtics with 33 points. Andre Drummond had 17 points and 15 rebounds for the Pistons, but he went 1 of 11 on free throws and was taken out for some key possessions toward the end to prevent Boston from fouling him.

Detroit went 16 of 35 from the line, while the Celtics were 24 of 30.

The Pistons rallied from a 15-point third-quarter deficit and led 96-95 when Reggie Jackson missed a 3-pointer with just under a minute remaining. That gave the Celtics a chance to take the lead, and Brown capitalized.

HONORED

The Pistons retired Richard Hamilton’s No. 32 during a halftime ceremony attended by several other players from Detroit’s 2004 championship team.

TIP-INS

Celtics: Thomas has scored at least 20 points in 43 straight games. … Boston led 54-50 at halftime and began the third quarter with a 13-2 run. … The Celtics were without G Avery Bradley, who was out with a sore right Achilles tendon.

Pistons: Detroit recalled forward Henry Ellenson and guards Darrun Hilliard and Michael Gbinije from the team’s Grand Rapids affiliate in the D-League. They did not play.

UP NEXT

Celtics: Host the Atlanta Hawks on Monday night.

Pistons: Host the Portland Trail Blazers on Tuesday night.