Report: NBA teams likely to resist stars participating in future international play in wake of Paul George injury

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The injury suffered by Paul George during Friday night’s USA Basketball exhibition in Las Vegas was not only enough to visibly shake the rest of the attending players and shut down the scrimmage completely, but it could have ramifications that affect the future of international play.

George is expected to be out for the entire 2014-15 Pacers season, and that fact is a sobering one not just for the Indiana front office, but for all 30 NBA teams.

Owners and general managers may want to try to restrict star players from competing internationally in the future, but that would be a fairly large overreaction given just how rare these types of injuries are. And, doing so would require a reworking of the NBA’s deal with FIBA, which prevents such restrictions, at least in the agreement’s current state.

From Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

Owners and GMs united tonight: Paul George injury could be tipping point for use of stars in international play. “Game-changer,” GM told me.

And from Marc Stein of ESPN.com:

NBA deal w/FIBA states that its teams can’t bar players from international comp unless there’s “reasonable medical concern” going in.

So that would suggest NBA teams won’t be able to put up any more resistance to international play unless/until its deal with FIBA changes

We’ve obviously seen injuries before in FIBA play but none involving Team USA stars. This will surely embolden NBA teams to voice objections

Stein also points out that this is the first major injury suffered by a USA Basketball participant since the original Dream Team started the tradition of professionals competing internationally back in 1992.

Pacers president Larry Bird, who would theoretically have been the one most upset by losing his star player for the upcoming season, had a calm, measured reaction when issuing a statement the very next day.

”We still support USA Basketball and believe in the NBA’s goals of exposing our game, our teams and players worldwide,” Bird said. “This is an extremely unfortunate injury that occurred on a highly-visible stage, but could also have occurred anytime, anywhere.”

And that’s the issue, precisely.

If NBA teams want to attempt to prohibit players from participating in international competition in the future in order to protect their investments, it would have to be a unilateral decision that restricted 100 percent of NBA players. It wouldn’t make sense, though, considering the league’s desire to continue to expand the game globally as much as possible, including with preseason exhibition games regularly scheduled to take place in other countries — one of which this October will feature the game’s best player in LeBron James.

No one would call for an end to basketball if James were to be hurt in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on Oct. 11, and no one should be calling for the end of players participating in international competition now. Injuries can happen at any time when the game’s greatest athletes are competing at its highest level, and as unfortunate as it was to see George go down like that in an exhibition contest, that singular event shouldn’t necessarily be cause for panic when considering how to proceed in the future.

On the other hand, we’re largely talking about the league’s biggest stars, and the ones most likely to have lengthy careers and Hall of Fame legacies. If players decide that saving their athletic abilities for achieving NBA success and pursuing the league’s championships are more important than representing their country in international competition, then George’s injury may indeed impact the choices we see the players make regarding USA Basketball, and how they now perceive its relative importance.

Kobe Bryant on race for Podoloff Trophy: “We might see our first co-MVPs this year”

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The race between James Harden and Russell Westbrook for the 2017 NBA MVP has narrowed to a two-man race toward the end of the season. The Oklahoma City Thunder star is averaging at triple-double this year, and the Houston Rockets guard is doing things nobody has ever done on a basketball court before.

It’s a tough decision to decide between them, so much so that even former Los Angeles Lakers great and 2008 NBA MVP Kobe Bryant can’t do it.

Speaking on ESPN on Sunday, Bryant said he thought the league might have to just bite the bullet on Westbrook vs. Harden.

“We might see our first co-MVPs this year,” said Bryant.

That would be a huge step for the league, but I’m not entirely sure they would do it. There have been co-NBA All-Star Game MVPs in years past, but never league MVP.

Still, can you decide between Russ and Harden? The Mamba can’t.

Watch Rockets C Nene lead the break, eurostep past Enes Kanter (VIDEO)

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Houston Rockets center Nene is from Brazil, but on Sunday against the Oklahoma City Thunder the South American native went full euro.

On a fastbreak possession, Nene took on Thunder big man Enes Kanter near the rim and absolutely shook him with a nasty eurostep.

The play was so good that it forced Oklahoma City to call a timeout as James Harden and the rest of the Rockets bench met Nene on the court to celebrate.

Kobe Bryant says he didn’t even have NBA League Pass until a month ago (VIDEO)

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What has retired all-time NBA great Kobe Bryant been doing with his time? A little of this, a little of that. Apparently that doesn’t include watching non-national NBA games.

Speaking with ESPN’s Jemele Hill and Michael Smith on SC6, Bryant revealed that he went to go watch a little NBA while he was getting a workout in at his house and realized he didn’t have the NBA package hooked up on his cable.

Via Twitter:

I don’t know if I totally buy this. On one hand, Kobe is a busy guy and he did spend two decades living and breathing the NBA night in and night out. I would expect that after all that time he might want some kind of relief.

Then again, to think that Kobe doesn’t have multiple assistants that would have handled that sort of thing already is sort of silly. The only benefit here is Kobe trying to sell that he’s just relaxing and not paying attention to the league too much, which is hilarious.

Kobe, we all know who you are by now. You’re watching the league, man. You’re Kobe. We get it. You didn’t suddenly turn into The Dude.

Let’s just hope Kobe’s League Pass works right off the bat. We all know how much of a hassle it can be.

Damian Lillard dismisses playoff expectations as pressure, says it insults regular people

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The Portland Trail Blazers have had a disappointing season thus far. The team is just 34-38 before their game with the Los Angeles Lakers on Sunday, and they’re battling it out for the last spot in the Western Conference playoffs with the Denver Nuggets.

This comes as after expectations rose greatly following the 2015-16 campaign which saw the Blazers finish 44-38, good enough for the No. 5 spot in the West.

Portland has looked better after trading Mason Plumlee to Denver in exchange for Jusuf Nurkic, but it might be too little too late. Meanwhile, team leader Damian Lillard isn’t bowing to the idea that last season’s good fortune raised the bar so much that it put undue pressure on his team.

Speaking with Sporting News, Lillard said he thinks the idea is really more about pressure vs. challenges.

Via SN:

Pressure, nah. Fam, this is just playing ball. Pressure is the homeless man, who doesn’t know where his next meal is coming from. Pressure is the single mom, who is trying to scuffle and pay her rent. We get paid a lot of money to play a game. Don’t get me wrong — there are challenges. But to call it pressure is almost an insult to regular people.

Look at the Wizards, they were kind of on the same wave as us. Didn’t even make the playoffs while we did. Now this year they’re the second-best team in the East. The adversity made them better. It can make us better, too. What I come from and my background made me who I am. As comfortable as I am with the good times, I’m also comfortable in adversity. Yeah, I might feel some type of way when somebody comes for me or says my name. But when it’s all said and done, it ain’t gonna rock me.

This is interesting to hear an NBA player say out loud. One, because I’m not sure I entirely believe it. You can have pressure without it having to be something that threatens your overall wellbeing.

Then again, maybe we’re arguing linguistics here. There’s definitely a different emotion from, say, trying to make sure you make rent and aren’t evicted to the street vs. trying to make the NBA playoffs. If one emotion is being defined as pressure, it makes sense to call the other a challenge.

It’s also interesting to hear an NBA player speak in those kinds of terms. There are a few guys around the league who seem to be relatively grounded and give out quotes like this from time-to-time. The absurdity of the NBA — playing games, making millions, and having folks worship you — would easily bend reality for most of us.

In any case, the challenge of making the playoffs for Portland is not going to be an easy one to overcome. Going into Sunday’s matchup with the Lakers, the Trail Blazers are a game behind Denver for the final spot.

Portland will face Denver on Tuesday, March 28 in perhaps their most important game of the season.