Team USA Showcase

Report: NBA teams likely to resist stars participating in future international play in wake of Paul George injury


The injury suffered by Paul George during Friday night’s USA Basketball exhibition in Las Vegas was not only enough to visibly shake the rest of the attending players and shut down the scrimmage completely, but it could have ramifications that affect the future of international play.

George is expected to be out for the entire 2014-15 Pacers season, and that fact is a sobering one not just for the Indiana front office, but for all 30 NBA teams.

Owners and general managers may want to try to restrict star players from competing internationally in the future, but that would be a fairly large overreaction given just how rare these types of injuries are. And, doing so would require a reworking of the NBA’s deal with FIBA, which prevents such restrictions, at least in the agreement’s current state.

From Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

Owners and GMs united tonight: Paul George injury could be tipping point for use of stars in international play. “Game-changer,” GM told me.

And from Marc Stein of

NBA deal w/FIBA states that its teams can’t bar players from international comp unless there’s “reasonable medical concern” going in.

So that would suggest NBA teams won’t be able to put up any more resistance to international play unless/until its deal with FIBA changes

We’ve obviously seen injuries before in FIBA play but none involving Team USA stars. This will surely embolden NBA teams to voice objections

Stein also points out that this is the first major injury suffered by a USA Basketball participant since the original Dream Team started the tradition of professionals competing internationally back in 1992.

Pacers president Larry Bird, who would theoretically have been the one most upset by losing his star player for the upcoming season, had a calm, measured reaction when issuing a statement the very next day.

”We still support USA Basketball and believe in the NBA’s goals of exposing our game, our teams and players worldwide,” Bird said. “This is an extremely unfortunate injury that occurred on a highly-visible stage, but could also have occurred anytime, anywhere.”

And that’s the issue, precisely.

If NBA teams want to attempt to prohibit players from participating in international competition in the future in order to protect their investments, it would have to be a unilateral decision that restricted 100 percent of NBA players. It wouldn’t make sense, though, considering the league’s desire to continue to expand the game globally as much as possible, including with preseason exhibition games regularly scheduled to take place in other countries — one of which this October will feature the game’s best player in LeBron James.

No one would call for an end to basketball if James were to be hurt in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on Oct. 11, and no one should be calling for the end of players participating in international competition now. Injuries can happen at any time when the game’s greatest athletes are competing at its highest level, and as unfortunate as it was to see George go down like that in an exhibition contest, that singular event shouldn’t necessarily be cause for panic when considering how to proceed in the future.

On the other hand, we’re largely talking about the league’s biggest stars, and the ones most likely to have lengthy careers and Hall of Fame legacies. If players decide that saving their athletic abilities for achieving NBA success and pursuing the league’s championships are more important than representing their country in international competition, then George’s injury may indeed impact the choices we see the players make regarding USA Basketball, and how they now perceive its relative importance.

LeBron says “get it done” message was for both Cavaliers, Thompson

LeBron James
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Everything LeBron James does and says gets magnified and scrutinized.

So when he put out this photo on Instagram standing shoulder-to-shoulder with Tristan Thompson and the caption “get it done” it seemed a message to the Cavaliers.

Get it done!!!! Straight up. #MissMyBrother @realtristan13

A photo posted by LeBron James (@kingjames) on

LeBron clarified that on Sunday, saying this has become a distraction, and the message was for both sides to bend, as reported by Dave McMenamin of ESPN and Chris Haynes of the Plain Dealer.

When Thompson didn’t sign the qualifying offer he surrendered a lot of leverage, the Cavaliers don’t have to raise their five-year, $80 million offer — but reportedly they still would, a little. Thompson and his agent Rich Paul have pushed for a max contract, but that’s not happening.

At some point, the two sides will come to an agreement. For the Cavaliers, this is a distraction, their star is unhappy with that, and ultimately if they are going to make a title run they need the energy and rebounding Thompson brings (even if it is just off the bench). For Thompson, he can’t make up a year of lost salary, he has to come in and start getting paid at some point.

The two sides will get it done. Eventually. Likely before the season tips off.

China basketball qualifies for 2016 Olympics

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China has secured the ninth and final Olympic men’s basketball berth awarded this year.

China earned the bid to the 2016 Rio Games with a 78-67 win over the Philippines. 2016 first-round draft prospect Qi Zhou had 16 points and 14 rebounds, setting up the Olympics to be his big introduction to American fans.

Former NBA player Yi Jianlian won tournament MVP by averaging 16.7 points, 8.8 rebounds, 1.4 assists and 1.2 blocks per game.

This will be China’s ninth straight Olympic appearance.

The Philippines, who got 17 points from Andray Blatche in the final, will still go to an Olympic Qualifying Tournament next summer with a chance to reach Rio.