Shelly Sterling, Donald Sterling

Testimony ends in Sterling probate trial, closing arguments next week


History suggests opening multiple battle fronts tends to be a sign of desperation and a losing tactic in a war… but Donald Sterling is both desperate and a guy whose legal strategy seems to be to start as many battle fronts with the NBA as possible regardless of the chance of success. He just wants to be a disruptive bully and drag this out (for tax reasons).

However, the battle front that really matters in the Clippers sale is the probate case between Donald and his wife Shelly over the Sterling Family Trust (which owns the team). That’s the case where a judge will determine if Shelly and her lawyers followed the proper legal steps in having Donald declared incapacitated (which left Shelly as the lone trustee, and she set up the sale of the team). If Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Michael Levanas rules for Shelly, the sale of the Clippers to Steve Ballmer for $2 billion most likely goes through quickly. If Donald wins he dissolves the Trust and tries to stall the sale process (although the NBA just has the other owners vote him out).

Testimony in the probate case came to a close on Wednesday, reports the Los Angeles Times.

Wednesday’s testimony centered on an Alzheimer’s disease expert questioning the validity of the mental test on Sterling and the results of those tests. The judge became annoyed with this line of questioning reports the Times because both sides decided before the trial that Sterling’s mental status would not be the issue — rather what matters is if the rules were followed from the trust. The expert said he thought the rules were not because part of the assessment was too casual.

Closing arguments are Monday. The judge likely rules in the coming weeks.

This case is different from the anti-trust case filed last month and the new lawsuit seeking damages that Sterling has filed against the NBA. Both of those cases could potentially become a nuisance and at worst an embarrassment to the NBA, but despite in both cases Sterling asked a judge to block the sale of the team legal experts say that is highly unlikely in those cases.

In the probate case, most of the observers in the courtroom think the judge will side with Shelly. Which is what the NBA wants.

Talk of the worst-case scenario painted by Clippers interim CEO on the stand Tuesday — Doc Rivers and key players trying to bolt, sponsors leaving and others not coming in, a downward spiral, dogs and cats living together, mass hysteria — has never been a very likely outcome, mostly because the league would never let it come to that. If Donald Sterling does win the probate case the league will go back to Plan A and have the other owners just vote him out of the club (something the NBA can do if Sterling is deemed bad for business, and he is). The league is expected to move on that in mid-September if this case is still hanging out there.

Levanas will have ruled by then, but there are questions of the appeal (Levanas can say Shelly can sell the team during the appeal process).

Basically, we know how this movie is going to end, Donald Sterling will lose the Clippers, we just don’t know how we will get there yet.

PBT Extra: Spurs showed Warriors have work to do defensively

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Nobody expected what happened Tuesday night in the Bay Area.

If you had said “San Antonio would beat Golden State by five” most people would have said that’s a possibility — but nobody saw a 29-point thrashing. A game where the Spurs were never threatened and where Kawhi Leonard looked like the MVP.

What does it mean? In this PBT Extra I talk about how the Spurs showed the Warriors they have some work to do on the defensive end. The Warriors clearly miss the rim protection and rebounding of Andrew Bogut, and they are going to have to make that up as a team (because Zaza Pachulia is no Bogut). The Warriors also have 81 more games to figure it out.

Cleveland, on the other hand, has it figured out.



Anthony Davis becomes first player since Michael Jordan to score 50 in opener – and adds 16-5-7-4

NEW ORLEANS, LA - OCTOBER 26:  Anthony Davis #23 of the New Orleans Pelicans shoots over Will Barton #5 of the Denver Nuggets during the second quarter at the Smoothie King Center on October 26, 2016 in New Orleans, Louisiana. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Sean Gardner/Getty Images)
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An astounding 86% of general managers said one year ago Anthony Davis was their preferred choice to build a franchise around.

An underwhelming season by the Pelicans put Davis in a strange light, and he ended the year sidelined due to injury.

Asked the same question this year, general managers gave Karl-Anthony Towns took a plurality of votes. Davis also plunged behind Kevin Durant and LeBron James.

Well, Davis sent a message to those who no longer view him as an elite franchise cornerstone. His opening-night performance:

  • 50 points
  • 16 rebounds
  • 5 assists
  • 7 steals
  • 4 blocks

The last player to score 50 in a season opener was Michael Jordan in 1989. No player since at least 1983-84 has matched Davis’ stat line across the five major categories in any game.

Yes, New Orleans lost – 107-102 to the Nuggets. But Davis’ teammates shot 36% from the field and 18% on 3-pointers.

Davis produced an all-time great individual performance. That the rest of the Pelicans couldn’t keep up says only so much.

He just knows how to make a splash in season openers.

76ers on blocking anthem singer wearing ‘WE MATTER’ jersey: ‘We use our games to bring people together’

BEVERLY HILLS, CA - AUGUST 01:  Actress Sevyn Streeter speaks onstage during the 'Ringside' panel discussion at the TV One portion of the 2016 Television Critics Association Summer Tour at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on August 1, 2016 in Beverly Hills, California.  (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)
Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Sevyn Streeter said the 76ers prevented her from singing the national anthem at tonight’s game because she was wearing a “WE MATTER” jersey:

76ers statement:

“The Philadelphia 76ers organization encourages meaningful actions to drive social change. We use our games to bring people together, to build trust and to strengthen our communities. As we move from symbolic gestures to action, we will continue to leverage our platform to positively impact our community.”

This is a continuation of Carmelo Anthony‘s argument: The emphasis should be on action in communities and there’s no longer a place for gestures like Colin Kaepernick kneeling.

But this needn’t be an either/or discussion. Community-based action is obviously important (though don’t assign responsibility to NBA players to fix racism). Recognizing the width and depth of the problem is necessary – which is why symbols matter, too.

Take Street’s shirt at face value. “We matter.” “Black lives matter.” What’s so offensive about that? There is no implicit “more” attached.

Yet, the 76ers found it antithetical to their brand.

This is why the widespread “unity” message preached by arm-locking NBA players left so much to be desired.

To the 76ers, unity meant silencing Streeter.

Is that what players were demonstrating on behalf of during the preseason? I’m sure that arena was much more united with a 76ers dancer singing the anthem than it would have been with Streeter spotlighted. But sometimes divisiveness is necessary to advance a cause.

If the 76ers don’t want Streeter using their platform to say “WE MATTER,” that’s their right. Not everyone has to support that choice, though.

Sevyn Streeter says 76ers prevented her from performing national anthem due to ‘WE MATTER’ jersey

BEVERLY HILLS, CA - AUGUST 01:  Actress Sevyn Streeter speaks onstage during the 'Ringside' panel discussion at the TV One portion of the 2016 Television Critics Association Summer Tour at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on August 1, 2016 in Beverly Hills, California.  (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)
Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

No NBA players followed Colin Kaepernick’s lead by kneeling during the national anthem in the preseason.

But that courageous form of protest still found its way onto NBA courts.

A national-anthem singer knelt before a Kings game, and other did at a Heat game.

Another singer wanted to take a bold stance for the 76ers’ regular-season opener against the Thunder tonight by wearing a “WE MATTER” jersey, but she said the team stopped her.

Sevyn Streeter:

A 76ers dancer performed the anthem instead:

The 76ers deserve some latitude to choose how someone uses their platform. But what about claiming black lives matter is antithetical to the 76ers’ brand?

The team did not immediately respond to request for comment. I will update if it does.