Milwaukee Bucks v Cleveland Cavaliers

Cavaliers’ coach David Blatt is in motion — just like he wants his offense to be


LAS VEGAS — David Blatt doesn’t sit much.

That’s one of the first things you notice when you watch him on the sidelines of a game — he’s in motion.

Like he wants his offense to be.

NBA rookie Blatt will coach the Cleveland Cavaliers next fall — a team now flush with LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and some very interesting young talent, not to mention skyrocketing expectations — yet he remains a mystery to many. He comes with the reputation of being an offensive genius, but there is no frame of reference with him. Blatt, an American who played at Princeton, spent the last few decades overseas, becoming one of the top coaches on that continent — he just led Maccabi Tel Aviv to an upset EuroLeague title win. He is the first coach to make the leap straight to head NBA coach from there. He is unique.

How is all that going to translate to the NBA?

We are just starting to see that at Summer League. Among the things you can learn watching him courtside in Las Vegas is he’s often moving. Summer League coaches tend to be planted in their chairs more than you see during the regular season. Not Blatt. He stands and paces, usually with his hands in his jean pockets. And he’s talking. To his players, his coaches, and nobody in particular.

“Andrew roll (off that pick). Go set another one.”

“Come through. Come through.”

“Use the screen.”

“Will (Cherry), one side, run it away from Jo (Harris, the other guard on the court).”

He implores his guys to get out and run at every opportunity, even off opponent makes.

Blatt leaps into a low defensive crouch with his arms extended to urge Steven Gray to get in a better defensive position late in a tight game. He talks to his guys more about defense than offense.

And he’s often talking to the bench, trying to teach the guys sitting there (or muttering things to his assistant coaches). At one point on a play where he likes what Anthony Bennet did setting a pick, Blatt walks down the bench and explains what he likes to the other bigs sitting there.

What you learn watching him is he an old-school coach in the meaningful sense — he likes teaching the game. He likes learning about the game. Talk to him a couple times and you see he’s a student of the game.

“All coaches should learn from other coaches, because as John Wooden says ‘it’s what you learn after you know everything that counts,’” Blatt said Thursday. “So I like to listen to guys like coach (Larry) Brown and many others.”

But what does all that mean for the Cavaliers offense?

There will be some Princeton in his offense — move the ball and keep moving off the ball — but what you can expect to see is an up tempo offense that is more about reading what the defense givez and trying to exploit it.

“I kind of want to see what the rest of my team is going to look like but right now, without question, we have some really good and intelligent players,” Blatt told ProBasketballTalk. “That will allow us to be a lot more read oriented then specific play oriented.”

That said, Blatt doesn’t have the answers on exactly what the offense and Cavaliers will look like because he is still figuring it all out. That’s what the summer is for.

“I have a big job to figure out the best way for us to play and utilize the many, many possibilities that are now at our disposal,” Blatt said earlier in the week. “I said the other day our set of limitations has changed and raised exponentially. There are a lot of possibilities and factors to be considered in building a team with guys that really want to play and want to play right.”

Has he consulted LeBron yet? Not yet, but they have texted.

“Everybody keeps asking if I’ve talked to LeBron. LeBron and I are going to talk a lot. Believe me,” Blatt said.

What Blatt does understand that there is a different rhythm to coaching in the NBA compared to Europe and he needs to get used to it, which is why he took on coaching the Summer League team when most coaches leave that to an assistant (fellow rookie coach Steve Kerr did the same thing).

“You’ve probably paid attention, I’ve blown enough situations in terms of timeouts and things like that,” Blatt said of his Summer League performance. “You know that’s why I wanted to do Summer League, I’m coming from a different set of rules and in some ways a different kind of basketball and the best thing I can do is immerse myself in that and take my hits, so to speak, make mistakes and get the knowledge from the coaches I need. It’s not things that are earth shattering, just knowing the rules and knowing what does and doesn’t go. So I’m really glad I had this experience, it helped me a lot.”

Blatt is polished and smooth with the media, flashes a good sense of humor and seems to being enjoying himself. He’s likable, the kind of guy you’d want to hang out and have a beer with.

But I don’t know how long he’d sit there. Blatt is a guy with a huge job this summer to put together systems to maximize what should be one of the East’s best teams.

Plus, he’s not a guy that sits much.

Gallinari ready to take big role in new Nuggets offense

Danilo Gallinari, Jimmy Butler
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DENVER (AP) — Danilo Gallinari wants everyone to know this: His surgically repaired left knee, the one that took three procedures to fix and nearly two seasons to fully trust, no longer bothers him.

The Denver Nuggets forward doesn’t need to be on any sort of minutes restriction. He doesn’t need days off during the season. And he certainly doesn’t need to be coddled.

He’s Gallo again, the hard-to-guard Italian playmaker who can knock down the 3-pointer just as easily as drive to the hoop or even post up. He believes he will fit in quite nicely into new coach Michael Malone’s system.

“The thing I’m focused on is trying to get (this team) back to the same level that the Nuggets were when I got to Denver, when we were going to the playoffs easy. When we were clinching a playoff one or two weeks before the season was over,” said Gallinari, who was acquired in the 2011 blockbuster deal that sent Carmelo Anthony to the New York Knicks. “We need to get back to that level.”

Almost seems so long ago, given that the Nuggets have missed the playoffs two straight seasons after consistently making it for nearly a decade.

Gallinari returned last season for the first time since blowing out his knee in a game on April 4, 2013. His minutes were closely monitored early in the season. He never really got completely on track until late last season, when he averaged 20.5 points over the final 10 contests, including a career-high 47 against Dallas. He’s hoping to carry that kind of confidence this season.

“I’m good to go. I was good to go as soon as the beginning of last year,” Gallinari said. “I was not on the same page with the coach that we had.”

That would be Brian Shaw, who was fired last March after 1 1/2 seasons in charge and going 56-85. Exactly why he wasn’t on the same page with Shaw, well, Gallinari preferred the past remain the past.

“I’m ready to play the new season,” he said. “We need to win games, and get back to the same level we were before.”

Gallinari thinks the Nuggets have the personnel to do just that, especially with a rookie point guard in Emmanuel Mudiay and Gallinari’s knee feeling better than it has in a while. He feels like he has some ground to make up, too, since he said that knee robbed him of some of his prime.

“Playing my best basketball right before I got injured,” the 27-year old said. “Now, we’re back to the same level, hopefully better.

“My knee has been feeling great. It felt great last year. Feeling great during the summer. Feeling great now. I just feel good.”

He spent the summer playing for the Italian team at the EuroBasket tournament, where he averaged nearly 18 points a game. In those games, Gallinari saw quite a bit of time at the four spot on the floor, forcing teams to either use a bulkier big man to cover him and risk getting burned on a drive or a smaller player that Gallinari could simply shoot over.

Malone plans to employ a similar type approach, something they discussed over gelato when the coach visited Gallinari in Italy soon after he was hired.

“He’s 6-foot-10. He can handle the ball. He can play pick-and-roll. He can stretch the floor and shoot the 3,” Malone said. “There’s not a lot he can’t do offensively.”

Gallinari wants the responsibility of being the go-to player for the Nuggets this season, especially at crunch time.

“I’ve always been trying to do that, since I came to Denver,” Gallinari said. “That’s what I like to do. I feel good filling those shoes.

“I want to have the ball in my hands. I do want to have the ball in my hands a lot more.”

Knicks’ Rookie Jerian Grant gets up, throws it down (VIDEO)

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The Knicks did well trading for Jerian Grant on date night — he’s going to be able to walk in this year and play quality minutes off the bench.

And, he can get up and throw it down.

Carmelo Anthony had 18 points to lead the Knicks to a 94-88 win over the Sixers.