Dan Gilbert

Report: Cavaliers efforts to trade for Kevin Love dead; Dan Gilbert says Cavs unified on top pick


I’d say the Kevin Love and LeBron James come to the Cleveland Cavaliers dream is dead, but frankly it was never alive save for in the minds of the delusional.

We’ll leave the LeBron half alone for now (he’s not leaving Miami anyway) and focus on Love — the Cavaliers have made a push to trade for him. At the heart of their offer was the No. 1 pick in this year’s draft, the chance for Minnesota to get a very good to potential foundational piece player and jump-start the rebuilding process. Except Minnesota has generally asked for established young players — Klay Thompson, Taj Gibson, Bradley Beal — and more importantly Kevin Love doesn’t want to be in Cleveland. At all.

So the Cavaliers talks are dead according to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports.

Cleveland’s pursuit of Minnesota Timberwolves All-Star forward Kevin Love – which included a package centered on the No. 1 overall pick in Thursday’s NBA draft – has sputtered because of Love’s warning that he’d never sign an extension with the Cavaliers, league sources told Yahoo Sports…

Cleveland was eager to build with Love and All-Star point guard Kyrie Irving and hoped that the pairing could’ve become an incentive for LeBron James to seriously consider a return to the Cavaliers in free agency, sources said. Through Love’s agent, Jeff Schwartz, Cleveland was warned that Love would opt out of his contract in 2015 and never consider the Cavaliers’ offer of a long-term maximum contract, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Now the question becomes what do the Cavaliers do with the No. 1 pick?

Reports surfaced recently (via Chad Ford at ESPN) that the Cavaliers front office was divided on the Jabari Parker/Andrew Wiggins question. Some wanted Parker, the more NBA-ready player right now, because he could help more next season and get the Cavaliers out of the lottery. Other people want to take Wiggins, the guy with the freakish athleticism that could lead to him being a foundational player for a franchise.

Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert took to twitter to refute there is a split.

I’ll ignore the whole “why does an owner care what Chad Ford says anyway?” angle of this thing. Although that is a valid question.

Rather my advice to Gilbert is this — if you don’t want people reporting these things shore up the leaks in your organization. Say what you will of Chad Ford’s opinions, or what Adrian Wojnarowski writes, neither just makes up reports. Both have connections.

Certain organizations are leaky, some are not — notice that when the Spurs make a move it seems to come out of left field? Notice how right before the Lakers made a huge trade for Pau Gasol there was no serious discussion of that deal? There are other teams in this camp.

Maybe the Cavaliers are talking out of both sides of their mouth in the run up to the draft as a smoke screen, but based on the organizational history I’m not sold.

Mark Cuban suggests supplemental draft for undrafted free agents

Mark Cuban
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A lot of people around the NBA have ideas to improve the draft, free agency and the D-League, and Mavericks owner Mark Cuban has never been shy about sharing his. His latest idea seems pretty logical: a supplemental draft for undrafted free agents.

Via Hoops Rumors:

“I would have a supplemental draft every summer for undrafted free agents of the current and previous 3 years,” Cuban wrote in an email to Hoops Rumors. “If you are more than 3 years out you are not eligible and just a free agent.”

The supplemental draft would have two rounds, and teams would hold the rights to the players they select for two years, Cuban added. Players can opt out and choose not to make themselves eligible, but those who get picked would receive fully guaranteed minimum-salary contracts when they sign, according to Cuban’s proposal.

“That would make it fun a few weeks after the draft and pre-summer league,” Cuban wrote. “It would prevent some of the insanity that goes on to build summer league rosters.”

It’s an interesting proposition. Most undrafted players who sign during the summer don’t get guaranteed contracts, so when deciding to enter this supplemental draft, they would have to weigh the value of having guaranteed money versus getting to decide where they sign. It’s unlikely that anything like this could happen anytime soon, because of all the hoops to jump through to get the league and the players’ union to sign off on it, but it’s a worthwhile idea that deserves some consideration in the next CBA negotiations.