Anjali Ranadive, Adam Silver

Report: Kings have three potential trades in place for No. 8 pick in NBA Draft


The Kings have their customary lottery pick to use in the upcoming NBA Draft, but using the eighth overall pick isn’t likely to provide the immediate help that a team under new ownership is looking for.

Sacramento traded for Rudy Gay last season in order to try to begin to win now, and it appears as though adding more proven veteran talent is the plan instead of accumulating more questionable rookie prospects.

For that reason, the Kings appear likely to trade their first round pick, and they reportedly have more than one offer already in place.

From Andy Katz of (via Sactown Royalty):

The Sacramento Kings are fielding offers from three teams for the No. 8 pick in Thursday’s NBA draft, sources with direct knowledge told ESPN on Monday.

Sources said the Kings have two deals that could be done prior to Thursday’s 2 p.m. ET trade deadline to change the draft order and one would be a draft night deal, depending on which players are available when the Kings select.

The three deals would return multiple draft picks and a veteran player to the Kings for the No. 8 pick.

Sacramento is among the least desirable situations for free agents to consider in the entire league, so trading for quality players is the only way to provide the type of upgrades the roster so desperately needs.

This move seems like a smart one depending what player may come back in return, and another team could probably use the help the number eight pick could provide more than the Kings can at this current stage of their rebuilding process.

James Harden: “I am the best player in the league. I believe that.”

James Harden, Stephen Curry
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James Harden was the MVP last season — if you ask his fellow NBA players.

The traditional award (based on a media vote) went to Stephen Curry (in the closest vote in four years), and that was the right call (in my mind). But from the time it happened Harden did not buy it. And he still doesn’t buy it. In the least — and he’s using that as fuel for this season. That’s what he told Fran Blinebury over at

“I am the best player in the league. I believe that,” he said. “I thought I was last year, too.”

Well, it’s a more realistic claim than Paul George’s.

“But that award means most valuable to your team. We finished second in the West, which nobody thought we were going to do at the beginning of the year even when everybody was healthy. We were near the top in having the most injuries. We won our division in a division where every single team made the playoffs.

“There’s so many factors. I led the league in total points scored, minutes played. Like I said, I’m not taking anything away from Steph, but I felt I deserved the Most Valuable Player. That stays with me.”

That’s very Kobe Bryant of you to turn that into fuel. Defining the MVP Award is an annual discussion that nobody agrees on.

I could get into how Harden was the old-school, traditional stats MVP, how that ignores how Steve Kerr used Curry, and how that opened up the Warriors’ offense to championship levels. Curry put up numbers, but he was also the distraction, the bright star that Kerr used to open up looks for Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, and others. Curry’s strength was not just what he did with the ball in his hands, but his gravity to draw defenders even when he didn’t. Did the Warriors stay healthier than the Rockets? No doubt. Should Curry be penalized for that?

It’s simple for Harden — if he can put up those numbers again, if he can be the fulcrum of a top offense, he will be in the discussion for MVP again. And, if he can lead the Rockets beyond the conference finals, nobody will talk about that MVP snub anyway.