NBA Draft preview: Get to know potential Euro lottery picks Dario Saric and Josuf Nurkic


From 2003 to 2007, 36 foreign-born were drafted in the first round of the NBA Draft.

Those heady days are gone, in years that number has fallen — this season it is expected to be three or four. Teams are being more picky and expecting those players to make an impact.

The biggest name is Dante Exum, the Australian combo guard who is likely to go in the top five or six picks. However, there are two other European players expected to be drafted in the lottery, Dario Saric and Josuf Nurkic? They have flown under the radar.

What should you know about them?

Dario Saric is a 6’10” point-forward style player out of Croatia. He is maybe the most versatile offensive player in this draft, he has impressive ball handling skills for his size, great scoring instincts (in the post and in transition), plus he can pass. He plays a high IQ game, which scouts always like.

Here is what PBT draft expert Ed Isaacson of and Rotoworld had to say about Saric.

“He has the ability to handle the ball well for his size (6’10) and having strong passing and scoring instincts. He is going to have some issues dealing with the strength of many NBA fours on defense, and while he rebounded well in the Adriatic League, I think he will have some problems with that in the NBA if he doesn’t add some muscle. The other concern is he really isn’t a great perimeter shooter, though he has improved, but being able to knock down shots consistently will likely be the key to him getting meaningful minutes quickly in the NBA.”

It might take a couple years for him to develop, but Saric has impressive potential.

It may take a little longer for the other European Josuf Nurkic — a 6’10” center out of Bosnia — to develop. He’s got NBA size and can use that physicality, but he is a bit of a project. There are things to like — toughness, good footwork, he’s an efficient scorer with a good touch around the rim, and he works hard for rebounds.

That said he’s not athletic for a center by NBA standards, and he needs to learn how to play defense and just gain experience in general. He could spend time in Europe for seasoning before coming over.

Here is Isaacson on Nurkic:

“He has shown that he can be a tough scorer around the basket and he has some good footwork for someone his size, but he really is still learning the game, something that is very evident when he is playing defense. He is likely a few years away from being ready for the NBA, and he may be better off staying in Europe a few more years to develop.”

DraftExpress has Saric going in the lottery and Nurkic going just after it, although Isaacson warns Nurkic could drop some.

The only other Euro who could go in the first round is Swiss big man Clint Capela, a 6’11” power forward. He’s an impressive athlete for his size and has great potential at both ends of the floor, but he is a big who loves his jumper that isn’t that good. When he gets to the rim and plays within himself you see the potential, but his feel for the game isn’t there and it leads to problems. It’s about polish and working hard to get those skills where he needs them.   

Potential No. 1 pick Joel Embiid suffers stress fracture

Celtics draft pick Marcus Thornton gets beer dumped on head during Australian game (video)

Marcus Thornton, Will Cherry
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The Celtics drafted Marcus Thornton with No. 45 pick in the 2015 NBA draft. That essentially entitled him to the required tender – a one-year contract offer, surely unguaranteed at the minimum.

Thornton rejected that, which is almost always a mistake.

Rejecting the tender is a favor to the drafting team, which gets to keep the player’s exclusive rights for a year. If Thornton tries to join the NBA now, he’s stuck negotiating with only the Celtics.

By accepting the tender, the player typically gets one of two outcomes. He either plays on that contract and draws an NBA salary or he gets waived. But even getting waived is better than rejecting the tender, because at least the player becomes a free agent and can negotiate with any team.

Players who reject the tender go to another league and play for less money. In Thornton’s case, that mean Australia.

How’s that going?

(Almost) never reject the required tender as a second-round pick.

Byron Scott says they just have to get Kobe Bryant better looks

Kobe Bryant, Joe Johnson, Byron Scott

Kobe Bryant is averaging 15.2 points a game at age 37. It’s just taking him 16.4 shots per game to get there. After his 1-of-14 shooting performance against the Warriors the other night — with too much isolation and too many plays run just for him — there has been a lot of talk about his shot. With reason, this is his shot chart so far this season.

Kobe shotchart season

So what do the Lakers’ do? Get Kobe to shoot less and get the ball in the hands of the young stars they supposed to be developing more? Nah.

They just need to get Kobe better looks, Scott told the Los Angeles Times.

“I know his mentality is that he can still play in this league,” Scott said. “And we feel the same way….

“Obviously he’s struggling right now with his shot, and I think everybody can see that,” Scott said. “So it’s trying to get him in better position to be able to have an opportunity to knock those shots down on a consistent basis. That’s No. 1.

“I don’t know if it’s his legs. I don’t think so. Again, our conversations are pretty blunt. … He tells me when he is tired and he tells me when he’s not tired. And the last few days, he said he feels great. So, I don’t think it’s a matter of him being tired or his legs being tired. I think it’s a matter of his timing being a little off.”

Yes, how could it be his legs? It’s not like he’s a 37-year-old with more than 55,000 NBA minutes played, and coming off an Achilles rupture and major knee surgery.

Honestly, I hope the Lakers and Kobe find a balance soon, because they have become just hard to watch. And I don’t want Kobe to go out this way.

Is Stephen Curry the Lionel Messi of the NBA?

Lionel Messi

Stephen Curry has reached the transcendent point in his career. We’re now talking about if he has passed LeBron James as the best player on the planet (he has), and we’re starting to think about his legacy as the perfect point guard for a modern NBA small-ball, space-and-pace offense. Plus he’s just a joy to watch play.

Does that make him the Lionel Messi of the NBA?

Curry was asked to compare himself to the Barcelona/Argentinian player who (arguably) is the greatest soccer player in the world, certainly as elite a finisher as that sport has ever seen. Here is his answer, via the Sydney Morning Herald of Australia. Is Curry the bigger international star now?

“I don’t know – it’s a chicken and egg kind of conversation,” Curry said while laughing.

“We both have a creative style, a feel when you are out on the pitch or the court. I’m trying to do some fancy things out there with both hands, making crossover moves and having a certain flair to my game and that’s definitely the style Messi has when he is out there in his matches.”

I love Curry, but Messi is the bigger international star.

But I love the comparison in terms of the must-watch nature of the two stars, the flair in their games, the sense that you have to keep an eye on them at all times because the spectacular could happen any time they touch the ball. When the ball comes to them, everybody leads forward in their chairs. That is the sign of a real superstar.