Hiring Derek Fisher was smart roll of dice by Phil Jackson

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Knicks fans were going to be skeptical no matter who was hired to coach their team. In part because they’re New Yorkers and are skeptical of everything. In part it was because there was always the inkling of hope the $12 million a year Phil Jackson is getting paid meant he was going to coach New York,  too.

That was never going to happen, Jackson is done behind the bench. He said that again on Tuesday at Derek Fisher’s introductory press conference.

What Jackson is really getting $12 million a year to do is change the culture of the Knicks — this was an organization focused too much on right now, not on patience and not on sacrifice. Draft picks were moved for quick fixes, guys that got on the court and aged quickly. Jackson needed someone who could preach the triangle and ball movement, who could sell the team-first concept. Jackson is trying to change the Knicks culture in basketball operations top to bottom.

Which is where Derek Fisher is a good hire as coach in New York.

Yes, Fisher is a gamble, but a smart one to take. More than any other quality Jackson needed someone with the same philosophies, someone he fully trusted to be his extension on the court. Jackson was never coming down to the sidelines, but he needed someone who understood and could be evangelical about his philosophies. Fisher has bought into what Phil Jackson is selling, and now it is his turn to sell them on a team-first system, on sharing, moving off the ball — you know, like those two teams still playing do.

Fisher commands respect and can lead — he can walk into that room and talk about sacrificing parts of your game to make the team better. He can talk about playing within the system. He can cite examples from Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neal and Kevin Durant and a host of other great players. He can show you the rings that it brings.

This gambe works whatever Carmelo Anthony decides to do next season. If he stays, to win the Knicks need Anthony to sacrifice parts of his game — to move the ball quickly and not have it stick, to be a good defender. Fisher knows about that. He can point to Kobe and others when he uses examples. If Anthony decides to bolt for wherever, Fisher can be part rebuilding the structures of this team on the court into a triangle unit.

Fisher can lead. They will put assistant coaches around him who can help with the Xs and Os, who can show Fisher how to properly set up a film session or the host of other little details that come with being an NBA coach. What Fisher can do is get people to listen to him and follow him.

Can Fisher coach? We will find out. If not he can be replaced in a couple years with someone who can. The money he is paid — $5 years, $25 million — can be shocking but it’s a pittance for the Knicks organization. The Knicks print money, spending it like this doesn’t matter to them like it does to 29 other teams.

What Fisher can do is lead. What Fisher does is buy into everything Phil Jackson is selling. He can get the players to buy in.

He can start to change the culture of the Knicks on the court.

And that is what Phil Jackson needed more than anything else.

That is why Derek Fisher was a good hire.

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Check out the 100 best crossovers of last season (VIDEO)

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Do you have 22 minutes to watch the 100 best crossovers of last season? It’s Monday, of course you do. It’s either that or work.

Here they are, as compiled by the fine folks at NBA.com. Enjoy. And don’t be shocked that Damian Lillard, Stephen Curry, and Russell Westbrook have the top spots.

And if you must go into the comments and complain that technically not all of these are crossovers, go ahead, but it doesn’t change anything. It’s like saying there is only one way to make a proper matzo ball soup — there are a lot of variations (I like it with dill in the broth), and they all can be delicious. Just enjoy it.

Cavaliers name Koby Altman full-time general manager

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CLEVELAND (AP) The Cavaliers have named Koby Altman their full-time general manager.

Altman’s promotion had been expected for days and was made official on Monday. The 34-year-old has been serving as Cleveland’s interim GM this summer after David Griffin parted ways with the club following the NBA Finals.

Altman has been with the club since 2012. He will be the fifth GM for owner Dan Gilbert since 2005.

Gilbert said he’s been impressed with the job Altman has done over the past five weeks and said he “has the credentials, knowledge, experience and instincts to be an outstanding general manager. … I am confident that Koby is equipped and prepared to lead and succeed in this dynamic environment.”

Altman is taking charge during an interesting juncture for the Cavs. All-Star point guard Kyrie Irving recently asked to be traded and LeBron James is heading into his final season under contract.

More AP basketball: https://apnews.com/tag/NBAbasketball

Report: Derrick Rose commits to sign with Cleveland Cavaliers

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It looks like former NBA MVP Derrick Rose is heading to the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Rumors have been swirling all week about Rose, who could be a backup or big-minute replacement for Kyrie Irving, who reportedly wants to be traded away from LeBron James and the Cavaliers.

According to reports released on Monday from Yahoo! Sports and ESPN, Rose has committed to sign with the Cavaliers after completing a physical. Rose will be paid $2.1 million on a one-year contract.

Via Twitter:

The Cavaliers have had one of the weirder offseasons, and while adding Rose isn’t necessarily the strangest thing they have done, it could be a larger signal for the rest of the league with regard to what direction the team is going to go.

Rose played OK in New York last season, and would be well suited as a backup bench spark for a contending team if he found the right fit. The Cavaliers will likely try him out in lineups with Lebron, but how he fits in as of the end of July isn’t quite clear. Will he be a backup? Will he be the de facto starter if Irving is no longer on the team come opening night?

The 2017 NBA offseason has been endlessly interesting, and this move is another in a long series of twists and turns.

Report: Spurs paying Pau Gasol about $16 million each of next two years

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The Spurs got Pau Gasol to decline his $16,197,500 player option, allowing them to chase major free agents. They didn’t take advantage of that flexibility, so they’re re-signing Gasol to make him whole – and then some.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

Sources: Free agent Pau Gasol’s deal to return to Spurs: three years, $48M with a partial guarantee on final year

If Gasol’s 2018-19 salary is guaranteed – strongly implied by this report – this is a bad contract.

The 37-year-old Gasol, still a nice player, isn’t worth $16 million this season in a tight center market. It’s fine to pay him that much given the circumstances of his opt out. But to guarantee him a similar amount – salary-cap rules dictate his 2018-19 salary be within 5% of his 2017-18 salary – at age 38 is an awful choice.

Especially for San Antonio, which was shaping up to have massive flexibility next summer.

The Spurs can still have significant cap room if LaMarcus Aldridge, Danny Green and/or Rudy Gay opt out. But then they wouldn’t have Aldridge, Green or Gay. So, the more space to upgrade, the better. San Antonio just cut about $16 million from that maneuverability.

Kawhi Leonard is a 26-year-old superstar who has proven his ability to thrive deep into the playoffs. Instead of aggressively working to add talent to chase another championship, the Spurs are surrounding him with the status-quo declining-veteran supporting cast.

That was acceptable this year, once Chris Paul chose the Rockets. But to commit about $16 million toward a similar team in 2018 is a major mistake.