Orlando Magic v. Philadelphia 76ers

Report: Magic’s Arron Afflalo open to being traded. Especially to a contender.


Arron Afflalo was the best player on the Orlando Magic last season, averaging 18.2 points per game and shot a career high .574 true shooting percentage despite having a much more prominent role in the offense and a lot more attention from defenses than ever before. But the Magic won just 23 games last season. It was a rough year.

Afflalo wouldn’t mind moving on to a team that wins.

That according to Brian Schmitz of the Orlando Sentinel:

Magic SG Arron Afflalo holds a player option for 2015-16 and can become a free agent after next season. Orlando’s classy leading scorer wouldn’t mind being moved to a playoff team. The clock is ticking loudly on his career as he’ll turn 29 in October.

Afflalo is owed a very reasonable $7.8 million next season, that for a quality two guard who can knock down the three and plays quality defense. There are a number of teams that could use him.

There’s going to be interest, but maybe not at the price the Magic are hoping to get.

This is not exactly the Kevin Love situation where there is pressure on the Magic to make a move, they are not at risk of losing a franchise cornerstone here. They could lose a quality player, but this is a young rebuilding team that should eventually draft/pick up a young point guard, move Victor Oladipo to Afflalo’s two guard spot and let them develop. If they lose Afflalo for nothing, it’s not that big a setback.

Just another name and scenario to watch as we head into the draft.

Report: Dwight Howard didn’t have offseason surgery

Dwight Howard
Leave a comment

Dwight Howard said he played with a torn MCL and meniscus in the Western Conference finals – pretty shocking news that few knew what to make of.

So, um, did he have offseason surgery?

Calvin Watkins of ESPN:

Howard obviously feels great about his health now, so maybe this was the right course.

We’ll never how Howard would have performed if fully healthy, but he averaged 14.4 points and 14.4 rebounds in 35.1 minutes per game against the Warriors during the conference finals. How bad could the injuries have been?

LeBron James says he rides a motorcycle

LeBron James
1 Comment

LeBron James appeared in a GQ video, and as one of the hosts discussed his leather jacket, LeBron noted he should’ve ridden his motorcycle to the set. It seemed the Cavaliers star might have been joking, but a few seconds later, he explicitly said he owned a different, three-wheel motorcycle.

Asked what the team thinks of his riding, LeBron said:

Oh, man. They’re like, “What are you doing?” I’m like, “What you think I’m doing? I’m getting a breath of fresh air. You know? I’ve got one life with this, man. So, that’s what I’m doing.”

It’s impossible to think of an NBA player riding a motorcycle without Jay Williams coming to mind.

Williams, the No. 2 overall pick in 2002, crashed his motorcycle after his rookie season and suffered career-ending injuries. The tragedy caused him to attempt suicide.

Thankfully, Williams – a college basketball analyst – appears to be doing better now. But that incident has left increased scrutiny on NBA players riding motorcycles.

The Collective Bargaining Agreement states (emphasis mine):

Accordingly, the Player agrees that he will not, without the written consent of the Team, engage in any activity that a reasonable person would recognize as involving or exposing the participant to a substantial risk of bodily injury including, but not limited to: (i) sky-diving, hang gliding, snow skiing, rock or mountain climbing (as distinguished from hiking), rappelling, and bungee jumping; (ii) any fighting, boxing, or wrestling; (iii) driving or riding on a motorcycle or moped; (iv) riding in or on any motorized vehicle in any kind of race or racing contest; (v) operating an aircraft of any kind; (vi) engaging in any other activity excluded or prohibited by or under any insurance policy which the Team procures against the injury, illness or disability to or of the Player, or death of the Player, for which the Player has received written notice from the Team prior to the execution of this Contract; or (vii) participating in any game or exhibition of basketball, football, baseball, hockey, lacrosse, or other team sport or competition. If the Player violates this Paragraph 12, he shall be subject to discipline imposed by the Team and/or the Commissioner of the NBA.

It’s hard to see the Cavaliers restricting LeBron on anything like this. They practically let him write his own contract – two-year max with a player option and trade kicker – annually so he can keep collecting as the salary cap rises. If he requested a clause allowing him to ride a motorcycle, would they really say no?

On the other hand, I doubt they want their franchise player taking any undue risks. It’s worth noting, though, that Williams wasn’t wearing a helmet and didn’t have a license. Maybe the Cavaliers could accept LeBron riding in a safer manner.

But if they didn’t consent and LeBron is riding a motorcycle, what would the consequences be? They’re not voiding his contract. It’d be up to the team and Adam Silver to determine punishment, and I don’t recall any precedent for that type of violation.