Danny Green helps Spurs pull away from Heat late

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Danny Green appeared to wrap up his lengthy postgame interview on NBATV, but he faced a couple more questions before he could leave the sweltering court.

“Do you guys have any extra towels we can borrow maybe?” Matt Winer asked. “We’ve got a show to get through.”

“They’re all wet towels, man, in the back,” Green said.

“Can I borrow that jump shot?” Thomas asked

“Psh, I need to find it again,” Green said.

All night, everyone kept asking more from Green. Finally he delivered.

After missing his first five shots, Green scored 11 points on 4-for-4 shooting in the final 6:07 of the Spurs’ 110-95 Game 1 win Thursday.

“I was pushing him hard,” Tony Parker said. “I don’t know if you saw, but every timeout, I was screaming at him and encourage him.”

When Green re-entered the game midway through the fourth quarter, eight of the other nine players on the court had played more than him. Perhaps, being a little more rested gave Green a significant advantage given the debilitating heat.

He certainly looked livelier than everyone else, at least.

Within a four-possession span, Green made two 3-pointers and dunked. Miami called timeout, but that didn’t cool Green, who made another 3-pointer after the break.

In a stat popularized by ESPN’s Kevin Pelton, the Spurs are now 26-1 (.963) when Green makes three 3-pointers and 48-25 (.658) when he doesn’t.

Green isn’t elite, the type of player who can singlehandedly carry his team to victory. But his success is a significant indicator of the Spurs’ success. When they’re moving the ball and spacing the floor, it results in Green getting open looks from beyond the arc

All three of his Game 1 3-pointers were assisted, and that’s par for the course. Green relies on his teammates to set him up.

They rely on him to knock ‘em down – no matter how slowly he starts.

Tim Duncan and Gregg Popovich see Green the same way, though – as they’re wont to do – they express it with very different degrees of warmth.

“Honestly, the way he shoots the ball, every time he shoots it, I expect it to go in,” Duncan said.

“That’s his major skill,” Popovich said. “If he’s not going to do that, then we might as well play somebody else. That’s the honest to God’s truth.”

Popovich turned to Green late, and Green responded. His second NBA Finals picked up where the first ended, but he didn’t let the wild swings in his production deter him.

Through five games of last year’s Finals, Green was a legitimate Finals MVP candidate. Then, he shot 1-for-7 in Game 6 and and 1-for-12 in Game 7, both San Antonio losses.

The Spurs were headed toward a third straight Finals loss to Miami, and though LeBron leaving the game carried more weight, Green ensured San Antonio took advantage.

“I told him after the game I was proud of him,” Parker said. “‘You have to keep playing. You’re a young player, and you’re going to get a lot of ups and downs. And that’s going to show your character.’ And tonight, he stuck with it.”

Video Breakdown: Clippers use JJ Redick in split cut to fool Jazz at 3-point line

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The Los Angeles Clippers dropped Game 5 to the Utah Jazz on Tuesday night, and find themselves down 3-2 as they head back to Salt Lake City for Game 6. The Clippers have had to deal with Utah’s formidable defense, so much so that they’ve built in counters to Jazz defenders overplaying shooters like JJ Redick.

One example of this countering method could be found in Game 3, when the Clippers ran a split cut for Redick. Instead of fighting endlessly around screens for a 3-point shot as you might expect, LA took the easy route and simply cut Redick to the basket for an easy layup as a means to take advantage of an overeager defender.

We’ve talked about the Split Cut here on NBA Playbook before. The Los Angeles Lakers used it earlier in the season to beat the Golden State Warriors, the team that uses the split cut perhaps the most out of any team in the NBA.

Other teams, including the Portland Trail Blazers, have adapted the Warriors’ use of the split cut as a counter for their own offense this season, which is a testament to just how useful it is.

If you need a reminder, a split cut all about a screener coming up to screen, then cutting toward the basket before his screen action fully takes place. It’s about timing, and catching defenders off guard when they go to set up their recover positions for screens.

For a full breakdown on the split cut and how the Clippers used it, watch the video above.

John Wall wears cape to postgame press conference (video)

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John Wall has been super, averaging 27 points and 11 assists while leading the Wizards to a 3-2 lead over the Hawks in the first-round.

Did you see Isaiah Thomas carry in Game 5? ‘No,’ says Fred Hoiberg, who walks off (video)

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Fred Hoiberg opened himself to clowning by complaining about Isaiah Thomas carrying.

So, the Bulls coach got clowned after the Celtics’ Game 5 win.

Jae Crowder leg-locks Robin Lopez (video)

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Late in the Celtics’ Game 5 win over the Bulls last night, Jae Crowder leg-locked Robin Lopez – the same dirty play that caused rancor for Matthew Dellavedova in the 2015 playoffs.

Lopez blocked Crowder’s shot, but the ball went to Al Horford, who attacked the basket. As Lopez tried to rotate to contest another shot, he couldn’t move. Crowder, who’d fallen to the floor, had him in a leg-lock. Lopez freed himself just in time to foul Horford.

Adding insult to avoided injury, Lopez got hit with a technical foul for complaining about the no-call.

I bet the league issues a technical foul on Crowder, too.