Paul George

Paul George just made $6,788,165*

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Paul George is having a good day.

The Pacers forward just made $6,788,165.*

*That number, and numbers in this post, are based on the NBA’s latest cap projection. When the league reviews its books and sets the actual salary cap in July, these numbers will change slightly.

By making the All-NBA third-team, George will earn more money on the five-year contract extension he signed before the season. As detailed previously, that extension set George’s 2014-15 salary to rise from 25 to 27 percent of the salary cap if he qualified for the Derrick Rose rule. By making an All-NBA team – the second of his career – he qualified.

The yellow line shows what George will make the next five seasons (27% of the max). The blue line shows what he would have made if he missed the All-NBA teams (25% of the max).

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Season 25% max 27% max
2014-15 $14,756,881 $15,937,431
2015-16 $15,863,647 $17,132,738
2016-17 $16,970,413 $18,328,046
2017-18 $18,077,179 $19,523,353
2018-19 $19,183,945 $20,718,660
Total $84,852,064 $91,640,229

Unfortunately for the Pacers, George’s good news is not their own.

They’ll owe George an extra $1,180,550 next season, cutting into their leeway for re-signing Lance Stephenson while avoiding the luxury tax (projected to start at $77 million).

Let’s say the Pacers keep all 10 players they have under contract for next season,* sign the No. 57 pick to a minimum contract and fill out a 13-player roster with one more minimum-salary free agent.

To avoid paying the luxury tax, that would leave $8,442,470 for Stephenson’s starting salary. Based on the length of the deal, here’s the most he could earn without forcing Indiana into the tax range:

  • One-year contract: $8,442,470
  • Two-year contract: $17,518,125
  • Three-year contract: $27,226,965
  • Four-year contract: $37,568,991
  • Five-year contract: $48,544,202

*George, Roy Hibbert, David West, George Hill, Luis Scola, Ian Mahinmi, Chris Copeland, C.J. Watson, Solomon Hill and Donald Sloan

If the Pacers need to offer Stephenson more money, they could waive Scola ($940,946 guaranteed) and replace him with a minimum-salary player. That would grant Indiana $3,953,256 in additional room below the tax line.

In that case, the Pacers could give Stephenson a starting salary of $11,454,780 and avoid the tax. Depending on length of the deal, that would look like (max):

  • One-year contract: $11,454,780
  • Two-year contract: $23,768,668
  • Three-year contract: $36,941,665
  • Four-year contract: $50,973,771
  • Five-year contract: $65,864,984

That should be enough wiggle room to re-sign Stephenson – though it leaves an opening for a preying opponent to poach him. Stephenson’s max starting salary next season is projected to be $14,756,881 – the same amount George avoided by making an All-NBA team. The Pacers would have to do more than just waive Scola to offer Stephenson his max.

Plus, if re-signing Stephenson requires waiving Scola, that wouldn’t leave much room under the tax line to upgrade the team elsewhere. Without making other moves, it’s unlikely Indiana could use its full mid-level exception ($5,305,000) without crossing the tax line.

However, the tax is not assessed until the end of the season. The Pacers could begin the year with a payroll over $77 million and figure out the rest as they go. Would they take that risk? I don’t know.

Paul George is having a good day. Because of it, the Pacers face a summer of tough(er) decisions.

All Chandler Parsons wants for Christmas is healthy knees

Memphis Grizzlies forward Chandler Parsons poses for a picture on NBA basketball media day Monday, Sept. 26, 2016, in Memphis, Tenn. Parsons signed with the Grizzlies in July. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
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It almost fits the song: “All I wants for Christmas is healthy knees, healthy knees, healthy knees.”

Chandler Parsons took to Twitter to answer questions from fans, and there were a few good answers in there but my favorite was this one:

Parsons has played in just six games for the Grizzlies this season, missing the start of the season to recover from off-season knee surgery, then now he has missed the last eight games with a knee bone bruise. The banged up Grizzlies could really use his shot creation back in the lineup.

As for other good questions/answers there was this combo, with a little help from ESPN’s Zach Lowe:

And then there’s this for the haters.

Sit back and watch the top 10 dunks from the first five weeks of NBA season

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Who doesn’t love a good dunk compilation?

Well, somebody probably just said “bah, humbug” but is that the person you really want to hang out with?

The fine folks at NBA.com put together the Top 10 dunks of October and November, and when Rudy Gobert dunking over Kristaps Porzingis is all the way down at 10, you know it’s a good list. Put off starting your Christmas shopping, at least for another 2:44, and watch the video.

Want to watch Chance the Rapper throw dodgeballs at mascots? Here you go.

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Want to watch Chance the Rapper throw dodgeballs at mascots? Of course you do. How is that even a question?

Above you can see just that from Chicago Friday night (where Dwyane Wade, Jimmy Butler and the Bulls knocked off the Cavaliers). Benny the Bull is on his side as well, while the Cubs’ mascot and others try and stay out of the way.

I’ll take this over another kids’ dribbling contest any day.

LaMarcus Aldridge, Manu Ginobili hustling saves lead to Spurs bucket (VIDEO)

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That’s about the most Spurs play ever.

During the third quarter of San Antonio’s win over Washington Friday night, LaMarcus Aldridge saved the ball from going out-of-bounds on the baseline, he threw it out high to Manu Ginobili, who had to leap and save it from going into the backcourt. Two hustle plays. From there the Spurs whipped the ball around the perimeter, and it ended up back to Aldridge on the baseline, where he nailed the 12-foot jumper.

Eventually, the Spurs would get a Kawhi Leonard jumper to give them the victory.