Dante Exum

Notes out of first couple days of NBA Draft Combine


As we told you going in, the NBA Draft Combine is not like its NFL counterpart — the results of the drills matter less, guys draft stock doesn’t move much (it’s the interviews and the medical tests that really matter).

Still, some guys do get noticed at the annual event in Chicago, which wraps up today (Friday).

Here are a few notes collected from around the Web and our own draft expert, Ed Isaacson or NBADraftBlog.com and Rotoworld.

• Australian Dante Exum — expected to go in the 5-7 range – is drawing a lot of attention, both from the media and from teams looking to meet in the interview process.

“In Exum’s case, he is still an unknown to many NBA people and it would be the first time for some of them to get a chance to speak with him,” Isaacson said. Teams likely to draft him will certainly be bringing him in for workouts as well.

• The other guy drawing interest for interviews is another lottery point guard — Marcus Smith of Oklahoma State. The reason here is the incident this season where he shoved a fan.

“Smart has always been the kind of player where there is always a lot of interest when he is in the room,” Isaacson said. “I think his on-court behavior was so shocking to many this year because he has always been well like among NBA people.”

• One guy who was on the bubble to get drafted at all and helped his cause was Green Bay center Alec Brown. He’s the tallest guy at the combine — measured at 7-foot without shoes — but that’s not what turned heads.

“Brown had one of the best shooting days of any player, including 18 of 25 from NBA 3-point range in the spot shooting,” Isaacson said. In a league that loves stretch fours and bigs who can spread the floor he’s going to get a little interest.

• Speaking of big men whose measurements caught the attention of people, Indiana’s Noah Vonleh did just that — and he was already a guy slated for the Top 10.

“While his height (6’8”) and weight (247) were as expected, his wingspan (7’4.25) and standing reach (9’0) stood out,” Isaacson said. “Also, he had the biggest hands of anyone measured. If this really helps him all that much remains to be seen, but it certainly isn’t going to hurt him. To be fair, Julius Randle was 1/4 inch shorter (without shoes) and his standing reach was just a 1/2 inch less than Vonleh, and Adreian Payne was an inch taller and his standing reach was also an inch more, so Vonleh wasn’t the only power forward who measured well.”

• One guy that caught the eye of a lot of media members in attendance was UCLA’s Zach LaVine, who showed off an impressive shot and some athleticism.

• His UCLA teammate Jordan Adams turned some heads as well. “First, he came to the combine much lighter than what he played last season at UCLA, and then he shot 17 of 25 from NBA 3-point range in the Spot Shooting,” Isaacson said.

Report: Some Hawks executives doubt Danny Ferry’s contrition

Danny Ferry, Mike Budenholzer
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Since his racist comments about Luol Deng, Danny Ferry has mostly avoided the public eye.

He apologized through a couple statements released around the beginning of his leave of absence. He met with black community leaders. He claimed “full responsibility.”

A cadre of NBA people vouched for him. A law firm the Hawks hired to investigate themselves essentially cleared of him of being motivated by racial bias.

But there’s another side.

Kevin Arnovitz and Brian Windhorst of ESPN:

Ferry’s efforts at contrition sometimes fell short to some inside the organization. Several Hawks executives were at times put off by Ferry’s behavior during a compulsory two-day sensitive training session, especially since they considered his actions triggered the assembly in the first place. He came across as inattentive and dismissive of the exercise, some said, and fiddled with his phone quite a bit. Ferry contends he was taking notes on the meeting.

“It was awkward for everyone because I had not seen or been around Hawks employees for three months,” Ferry told ESPN this summer about the sensitivity training. “I took the seminar seriously, participated in the role-play exercises and certainly learned from the two-day session.”

the Hawks satisfied Ferry on June 22 by releasing both the written Taylor report and a flowery press release in which Hawks CEO Koonin was quoted saying, among other things, that “Danny Ferry is not a racist.” Some Hawks executives grumbled that the team overreached in exonerating Ferry, but doing so — not to mention paying Ferry significantly more than the $9 million he was owed on his “golden ticket” deal — was the cost of moving on.

I don’t know whether Ferry has shown the proper level of contrition, whether he was playing on his phone or taking notes.

But I know what he said:

“He’s a good guy overall, but he’s got some African in him, and I don’t say that in a bad way other than he’s a guy that may be making side deals behind you, if that makes sense. He has a storefront out front that’s beautiful and great, but he may be selling some counterfeit stuff behind you.”

He was not reading directly from a scouting report. He did not stop when his paraphrasing repeated a racist trope.

That’s a problem.

I don’t think Ferry intended to say something racist – but he did.

It’s a fixable issue, though. Through introspection and a desire to change, he can learn from this mistake. Maybe he already has.

That some around him don’t think he took that process seriously is worth noting. They might be off base, and Ferry obviously disagrees with their perception. But this is a two-sided story despite the common narrative focusing on Ferry’s redemption.

It’ll be up to any potential future employers to sort through the discrepancies.

Gilbert Arenas: Caron Butler’s version of gun incident ‘false’

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Caron Butler recently detailed the Gilbert Arenas-Javaris Crittenton gun incident.

In a since-deleted – but screenshot-captured – Instagram post, Arenas gives his description:

The biggest differences between Butler’s and Arenas’ versions:

1. Arenas claims he wasn’t the one who owed Crittenton money, that the feud escalated over Arenas prematurely showing his hand during a card game.

2. Arenas says he told Crittenton to pick a gun to shoot Arenas with – not to pick a gun he’d get shot by Arenas with.