Donald Sterling

Lawmakers want to prevent Donald Sterling from deducting NBA’s $2.5 million fine from his taxes


The NBA calls its financial penalties “fines,” but they’re really forced charitable donations. They’re also, as Lamar Odom successfully argued to the IRS, business expenses.

You can bet Donald Sterling will try to write off his $2.5 million fine on his taxes.

On both the federal and state levels, lawmakers want to prevent that.

Kay Bell of Don’t Mess With Taxes:

Any deduction is just not right, say six House Democrats. So they’ve introduced the Stop Penalizing Taxpayers for Sports Owner Fouls Act of 2014.

The bill, which would apply to fines since Jan. 1, says:

In the case of an individual who owns (directly or indirectly) a professional sports franchise, no deduction shall be allowed under sub- section (a) for any fine or similar penalty paid to the professional sports league or association of which the franchise is a member.’’.

This would apply to Sterling – and was obviously proposed with him in mind.

As unsympathetic as Sterling is, I just don’t believe this law would be constitutional. If passed – which I suspect is unlikely to happen anyway – the courts could deem it ex post facto. In other words, the law punishes for acts committed before the law passed, usually a method not allowed in the United States.

Plus, I don’t like further complicating an already far-too-complicated tax code with a specific rule that singles out sports owners. Why should sports owners have their own tax code? What makes them different than the rest of us? (Yes, I’m against stadium subsidies, too. Don’t fix that problem by creating another.)

California lawmakers are proposing something similar. Phil Willon of the Los Angeles Times:

Two state Assembly members from Los Angeles filed legislation Tuesday that would prevent sports team owners from writing off league fines as a business expense when they file their state income tax returns.

The bill was filed by Democratic Assemblymen Raul Bocanegra of Pacoima and Reggie Jones-Sawyer of Los Angeles.

“Donald Sterling’s outrageous comments and historic fine should not be rewarded with a multimillion-dollar tax refund,” said Bocanegra, who chairs the Revenue and Taxation Committee. “This fine is intended as a punishment; it should not be used as a tax loophole.

The specifics of this bill are not clear, but I have the same concerns stated above.

At least one politician, though, might be on the right track – actually using the Sterling situation to do good. Willon:

Meanwhile, Rep. Brad Sherman (D-Sherman Oaks) has asked city, state and federal regulators to “prioritize” inquiries into any allegations that Sterling’s companies engaged in racial discrimination against people who sought to rent apartments at the billionaire’s residential properties.

In a letter to the regulators, Sherman cited a payment of more than $2.7 million that Sterling made in 2009 to settle federal claims that he discriminated against tenants. Sherman’s letter did not say there were allegations pending against Sterling or his companies.

If there aren’t new allegations against Sterling, it would be difficult to do much now after he’s settled, but yeah, the government should definitely be further investigating Sterling’s alleged housing discrimination. While they’re at it, apply that level of scrutiny to everyone – not just the headline-inducing Sterling – suspected of housing discrimination. That actually matters.

Khris Middleton dunks, Jimmy Butler can’t stop him (VIDEO)

Leave a comment

Khris Middleton has more expectations and more pressure on him after a breakout season in Milwaukee, followed by him getting him PAID this summer.

Well, he looked pretty good on this play against the Bulls, making the steal then throwing down despite Jimmy Butler‘s efforts to stop him.

Middleton finished with 10 points on 5-of-7 shooting for the Bucks. However, Butler had the last laugh as he went off for 23 points on 12 shots and led the Bulls to the (meaningless) preseason win.

Somebody looks comfortable: Paul George drops 20 in first quarter

Leave a comment

Paul George‘s first experience starting as a power forward was going up against Anthony Davis — not just one of the best power forwards in the game, one of the handful of best players in the game period. That didn’t go well for George, and he wasn’t happy about it.

His second experience was in another preseason game Tuesday, going up against the Pistons and their four, Ersan İlyasova. He’s not quite as intimidating.

George scored 20 points on 7-of-8 shooting, 4-of-5 on threes — and that was just the first quarter (you can see it all in the video above).

As we have said before, George at the four is not a bad call by the Pacers, but some of that depends on the matchup. On the nights the Pacers face Davis or Blake Griffin or LaMarcus Aldridge or Zach Randolph (or a handful of others) the Pacers’ coaching staff is going to have to adjust. But there are a lot of nights where George at the four is going to force the other team to adjust, and that will play into the Pacers’ hands.