Reports: Oprah Winfrey, Floyd Mayweather Jr., even Matt Damon would like to buy Clippers

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In this arena, Floyd Mayweather Jr. is a pretender… not that I’d say that to his face.

It didn’t take long after NBA Commissioner Adam Silver dropped the hammer on Clippers owner Donald Sterling over his racist comments and said the league was going to try to force him to sell the team that potential suitors lined up with an interest in purchasing the team. (No, Shelly Sterling, Donald’s estranged wife, is not in that group.)

Magic Johnson and the Guggenheim Group (which already own the Los Angeles Dodgers) are already trying to get in the front of the line, according to multiple reports. But they have a lot of company.

Boxing’s powerhouse Mayweather is one of those. A regular at Lakers and Clippers games, he wants in, reports ESPN.

Mayweather said he was serious about his interest and that he had spoken with his adviser, Al Haymon, about teaming with Mayweather Promotions chief executive Leonard Ellerbe, Golden Boy Promotions chief executive Richard Schaefer and possibly others to make a bid for the Clippers.

“I called Al today about that to see if me, Leonard and Al, and hopefully Richard and a couple of other guys, a couple other of my billionaire guys, we can come together and see what we can come up with,” Mayweather said. “Hopefully, we can do it, and it’s not just talk.

Let’s set aside Mayweather’s gambling history and his ability to clear the league’s background check for owners, Mayweather would need a lot of help — his net worth is estimated in the $150 million range and the price tag for the Clippers is likely going to be in the $1 billion range (according to sources and other reports). Same with Oscar De La Hoya, who also is interested but worth roughly $200 million. In this ring, Mayweather and De La Hoya are not big time.

Oprah Winfrey is (estimated net worth around $3 billion). Entertainment mogul David Geffen is ($6.2 billion). And those two may be teaming up, reports Darren Rovel of ESPN.

Larry Ellison has been looking to buy a team and move them to San Jose, but it’s hard to see that outcome here — these partners wouldn’t want to move the team. Plus, if you move a team out of the nation’s second largest media market you are doing it wrong.

One fun name on the list — Matt Damon would love to be a minority owner.

Also on the minority owner wish list is Malcolm in the Middle’s Frankie Muniz.

There also will be a lot of names you don’t know who will have a serious shot at this. For example Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong is one of the richest men in Los Angeles with a net worth of $7 billion, and he is the guy who bought Magic Johnson’s minority share of the Lakers. Soon-Shiong both has the money to get in this game and has already gone through the NBA’s vetting process for owners, there are no surprises there for the league.

It’s going to be a little while before a sale takes place. The NBA owners have to formally charge Sterling, have a hearing where both sides can present evidence, then the owners would vote. The NBA owners meet every July and this could happen then, except you can expect Sterling will fight this with lawsuits (plural) in federal court, dragging the process out. He’s a litigious person and is not just going to roll over for the “good of the game” here. That’s not in his nature.

When the sale process does move forward (and assuming the NBA runs it) expect a blind bid process (similar to how the Dodgers were sold out from under Frank McCourt by Major League Baseball). That process tends to bring in incredibly high bids as groups don’t know what others will bid. By the way, Magic Johnson and his group won the Dodgers in that process.

And yes, after league expenses, Donald Sterling will get that money. He bought the Clippers in 1981 for $12.5 million and will turn a handsome profit on this deal.

Report: Carmelo Anthony would’ve allowed Knicks to trade him to Trail Blazers if no deal with select three teams

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Carmelo Anthony spent most of the offseason saying he’d waive his no-trade clause for only the Rockets.

But as training camp neared and Anthony faced returning to the Knicks, he expanded his list to include the Thunder and Cavaliers.

Just how badly did Anthony want to leave the Knicks?

Marc Berman of the New York Post:

Sources say Anthony would have allowed the Knicks to deal him to Portland if the Knicks struck out with the other three.

Apparently, the Trail Blazers’ recruitment almost worked. Of course, the Knicks traded Anthony to Oklahoma City. But this report raises a couple questions:

How many teams would have Anthony approved in a trade? He obviously preferred to leave the Knicks, but he also had reasons to stay in New York. We now know Anthony preferred at least four teams to the Knicks, but how long is that list? Twenty-nine teams?

Did the Knicks err by sending Anthony to Oklahoma City? Maybe the Trail Blazers would’ve never beaten the Thunder’s offer (the Bulls’ 2018 second-round pick, Enes Kanter and Doug McDermott). But if New York had played hardball, it could have at least brought Portland into a bidding war.

Damian Lillard, Jusuf Nurkic make plays late to lift Blazers past Nets

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NEW YORK (AP) — Jusuf Nurkic apologized to Damian Lillard as they strolled back to their locker room, upset he had missed two free throws with less the three seconds left, giving the Brooklyn Nets a chance to either tie or win it at the buzzer.

All Lillard could care about was Nurkic’s heads-up play a couple of seconds earlier that eventually served as the game-winner.

Lillard scored 34, Nurkic added 29 and 15 rebounds, including eight in the fourth quarter, and the Portland Trail Blazers rallied from a six-point deficit late in the fourth quarter to edge the Nets 127-125 on Friday.

“After the game he was telling me, `Man, my bad I missed the free throws, I did this and I this that’,” Lillard recalled. “I stopped in the hallway, I said, `I don’t care about none of that, the most important thing is you made the biggest play of the game’.”

Portland trailed 121-115 with 2:20 left after former Trail Blazers’ guard Allen Crabbe floater. The Trail Blazers then scored the next eight points, capped by Shabbaz Nappier’s three-point play with 55 seconds left. Brooklyn’s Spencer Dinwiddie then evened it 123 with a putback layup after missing his own 15-foot pullup shot.

Lillard then freed himself off Dinwiddie’s tight defense as Nurkic set a pick at the 3-point arc, diving to the basket as the Portland point guard served him the ball. DeMarre Carroll then slid in to help on the coverage, blocking Nurkic right under the basket. Caris LeVert briefly had control of the ball before the Trail Blazers’ center snatched it away and put it through, drawing a foul and capping a three-point play with 27 seconds left to put his team ahead for good, 126-123.

“I learned never quit,” said Nurkic, who had eight rebounds and two of his four blocks in the final period. “There’s no lost possession. I see an opportunity to steal the ball and try to make a play. It (went) in.”

Despite Lillard’s words of encouragement, he was still beating himself for making 5 of 10 free throws.

“I know I am a way better free throw (shooter) than I am showing,” said Nurkic.

CJ McCollum chipped in 26 for the Trail Blazers, who found themselves down by 11 in the first quarter in a post-Thanksgiving noon tip.

The Trail Blazers’ defense held the Nets 0 for 5 from the field during their key fourth quarter 8-0 run, two days after a disappointing 20-point loss at Philadelphia.

“We made some good defensive stops in the last minute and a half and were able to convert in the other direction,” Portland coach Terry Stotts said.

Dinwiddie had 23 for the Nets, who have lost three straight games – the previous two to the defending champions, Golden State Warriors, and Cleveland Cavaliers.

After cutting Portland’s lead to 126-125 with 15.7 seconds, he had a chance to put the Nets ahead but missed a 3-pointer with 4:8 seconds left.

“I felt like it was a good look,” Dinwiddie said. “It bounced around the rim a couple of times but didn’t go in.”

Brooklyn had six other players score in double-figures, including Rondae-Hollis Jefferson had 17. Sean Kilpatrick added 14 and Joe Harris scored 14.

 

Should Cavaliers be interested in DeAndre Jordan? At what price?

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In a season ravaged by injuries, the Clippers are stumbling and — especially if the stumbles continue — they will be left with a couple of hard questions. One is the future of Doc Rivers.

The other is the future DeAndre Jordan. He has a player option for next season and almost certainly becomes a free agent. While new Clipper president Lawrence Frank has said he wants Jordan to be a “Clipper for life,” other teams are calling Frank to see if Jordan is available. If the Clippers think they may not be able to re-sign him this summer, they have to consider their options. Including a trade.

Should the Cavaliers be one of those teams calling the Clippers? Joe Varden of the Cleveland Plain Dealer had this answer to that question.

DeAndre Jordan’s numbers are down this season. He’s averaging 10.4 points and shooting .664 from the field (he only shoots twos). Even his blocks — 1.2 per game — are down from the 1.7 he averaged a year ago. Also, Jordan, 29, has a $24.1 million player’s option in his contract for next season. So, he could essentially be a rental. That said, you’re right, he’d thrive playing alongside LeBron James and Isaiah ThomasTristan Thompson was great against the Warriors in the Finals two seasons ago, and struggled mightily last year. A league source believes this move, Jordan for Thompson, is one the Cavs would consider. How the Brooklyn pick figured in remains to be seen (Cleveland also has its own No. 1 pick), but if the Cavs felt Jordan was the only piece missing for them to take down the Warriors they’d have to consider this.

First, Jordan’s numbers are down this season because Austin Rivers is feeding him the ball off pick-and-rolls, not Chris Paul. That’s a huge talent drop off. Jordan and Paul played well off each other, a decrease in counting stats was to be expected.

Second, it’s fair to ask if Jordan actually puts the Cavaliers on the level of the Warriors? I don’t see it, and if the Cavaliers don’t think he puts them on that tier, they should be careful about what they offer.

Finally, Jordan would be a rental, although the Cavaliers might be able to re-sign him if the price was right and LeBron stays.

What I’ve heard around the league is that the Brooklyn pick is off the table right now, that Cleveland may be willing to move their own first rounder (likely in the mid-20s). The bottom line on the scenario above, Jordan is an upgrade on both ends of the court over Tristan Thompson, even when Thompson is healthy. If the Cavaliers are all-in for a title this season, they have to seriously consider it.

Would a  Thompson and Cavaliers pick get the deal done? Thompson has two-years, $36 million on his contract after this season, the Cavaliers might like to have the flexibility of Jordan’s expiring deal over TT (despite Thompson’s close ties to LeBron). However, would the Clippers take on that extra salary for just a late first rounder? Not likely. They will demand the Brooklyn pick at first. The question is will the Clippers come around to what the Cavaliers offer? Or will Cleveland decide that this season is more important than future protections and throw the Brooklyn pick in?

Other teams — Washington and Milwaukee are rumored among them — are calling the Clippers, too.

The first question is, will the Clippers want to trade DJ at all, or are they going to stand pat and try to re-sign him. The ball is in Lawrence Frank’s court right now.

 

Kyrie Irving: ‘I see you. I see everyone. More than just your physical presence, I see your energy. I feel it. I know it’

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Kyrie Irving has done good lately.

Not just during Celtics games. He gave his jersey and shoes to military members in the crowd, and he recently shared a Thanksgiving dinner with Boston families.

Irving also addressed the event.

Irving, via Nicole Yang of Boston.com:

“I see you,” he said. “I see everyone. More than just your physical presence, I see your energy. I feel it. I know it.”

“I think that the most important thing that I strive to live by is extremely by truth and by consistently giving others the truth, without any judgement, without constraints, without anything extra except the understanding that I see you,” he said. “I have family members who come from knowing energy, and it was passed along to me.”

I can’t get enough of all this stuff.