Mike D'Antoni

Mike D’Antoni resigns as Lakers head coach


After the worst season in franchise history, after multiple players — including Kobe Bryant — suggested they wanted a new coach, and with a fan base up in arms about him, this isn’t really a surprise.

Mike D’Antoni has resigned as the Lakers head coach, the team announced.

“Given the circumstances, I don’t know that anybody could have done a better job than Mike did the past two seasons,” Lakers GM Mitch Kupchak said in a released statement. “On behalf of the Lakers, we thank Mike for the work ethic, professionalism and positive attitude that he brought to the team every day. We wish him the best of luck.”

This very likely was a resignation where he was allowed to save face rather than be fired. D’Antonio had wanted his 2015-16 option picked up, the Lakers declines. D’Antoni was owed $4 million next season and got a portion of that to walk away, reports Mike Bresnahan of the Los Angeles Times.

D’Antoni was an odd hire from the start (a start that was 10 games into a season after the Lakers fired Mike Brown thinking “things can’t get worse….”). D’Antoni started off behind the eight ball with Lakers fans because he wasn’t Phil Jackson.

Unlike what many Lakers (and Knicks) fans think, he can coach and his system can win — go watch Miami, they borrow liberally from it. Gregg Popovich and the Spurs borrow from it. D’Antoni has influenced the NBA dramatically.

But he is wed to his system — he has to win his way. (Those other teams have modified what he does to work better with their rosters, and to defend better, but D’Antoni hasn’t really shown that.)

From the day he was hired the Lakers’ roster was a poor fit for the D’Antoni system. Dwight Howard is one of the best pick-and-roll bigs in the game but he wants to play in the post. The Lakers did not have a point guard who fit their system, save for the often injured and well worn Steve Nash. Kobe circa 2004 or so would have been amazing in D’Antoni’s system, but he can’t get up and down the floor and play that style anymore. Kobe’s a post/elbow guy now. Pau Gasol is not a stretch four, just ask him. And it goes on and on down the Lakers roster.

This season the Lakers were ravaged by injuries.

Combine that with D’Antoni’s poor communication skills with players and it all falls apart fast.

In his two seasons D’Antoni was 67-87.

A lot of big names will come to the forefront to be the Lakers coach (no, not Phil Jackson, he’s got what he wants in New York now). Expect Steve Kerr, Stan and Jeff Van Gundy, George Karl, Kevin Ollie, and Lionel Hollins to be mentioned.

That said, expect Byron Scott to be high on the list. After going “outside the family” to hire Brown and D’Antoni, look for the Lakers to stay within their family. Scott has been doing some studio analysis for the Lakers’ cable network in Los Angeles this past season.

Somebody looks comfortable: Paul George drops 20 in first quarter

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Paul George‘s first experience starting as a power forward was going up against Anthony Davis — not just one of the best power forwards in the game, one of the handful of best players in the game period. That didn’t go well for George, and he wasn’t happy about it.

His second experience was in another preseason game Tuesday, going up against the Pistons and their four, Ersan İlyasova. He’s not quite as intimidating.

George scored 20 points on 7-of-8 shooting, 4-of-5 on threes — and that was just the first quarter (you can see it all in the video above).

As we have said before, George at the four is not a bad call by the Pacers, but some of that depends on the matchup. On the nights the Pacers face Davis or Blake Griffin or LaMarcus Aldridge or Zach Randolph (or a handful of others) the Pacers’ coaching staff is going to have to adjust. But there are a lot of nights where George at the four is going to force the other team to adjust, and that will play into the Pacers’ hands.

Is DeMarcus Cousins MVP worthy? “It’s mine to grab”

DeMarcus Cousins

Last season, DeMarcus Cousins received zero MVP votes (the same as every year of his career). Even though he averaged 24.1 points, and 12.7 rebounds a game, which was enough to get him his first All-Star berth, MVP is another thing entirely. Only players on winning teams tend to draw the attention of MVP voters.

This season, can Cousins — arguably the best center in the game — get in the conversation?

He thinks it’s more than just that, he told Kevin Ding at Bleacher Report.

The topic is the 2015-16 NBA MVP award and whether it could be reachable for DeMarcus Cousins.

“Reachable, man?” Cousins told Bleacher Report, his voice rising high. “It’s mine to grab.”

As noted above, the only way Cousins gets into the conversation — fair or not — is if the Kings are in the playoffs (at the very least). He understands that.

“It’s going to take a full team effort,” Cousins said. “I’ll try to play at a high level and bring my team along with me.”

Vlade Divac built a Kings’ team designed to start winning now — as you would expect from a team a year away from moving into a new arena they need to fill. Owner Vivek Ranadive is not about selling hope anymore, he wants to sell wins.

I think Cousins can help provide that.

I’m less sold on the cast around him being able to help.