Donald Sterling reportedly says Los Angeles Clippers not for sale, so what’s next?

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NBA commissioner Adam Silver acted decisively – banning Donald Sterling for life, fining him $2.5 million and setting in motion a process that would force Sterling to sell the Los Angeles Clippers if 3/4 of NBA owners vote in favor.

Silver would not have taken that last measure without absolute certainty he has the votes, and he’s not hiding confidence I what will happen next.

“I fully expect to get the support I need from the other NBA owners to remove him,” Silver said.

And how will Sterling take it?

“I have no idea,” Silver said.

Sterling is the huge wildcard here.

He could go silently into the night, accepting his billion dollars and fading from the spotlight. Or he could file a lawsuit and fight Silver’s punishment.

Sterling, in an off-camera interview with Fox News’ Jim Gray, indicated the latter is more likely. According to Gray, Sterling said the Clippers are not and would not be for sale.

I don’t see how this ends cleanly if Sterling pursues legal action.

The NBA constitution is not publicly available, but we’ve learned a little about it through published reports. How to interpret the document remains difficult, potentially even for those with access to it.

Before Silver announced his ruling, Tulane Sports Law Program Director Gabe Feldman explained the league’s constitution thusly:

If Sterling sues the NBA, the court could agree with Feldman and say some of the penalties – the extra $1.5 million in fines and having to sell the team – exceed Silver’s bounds. The NBA constitution is not a legal document, but parties can sue on the basis the league did not follow its own rules.

And then, if it gets that far, there’s the matter of the team being sold. Who runs the sale if Sterling is banished? Again, it’s not clear whether the NBA constitution spells this out, but Zach Lowe of Grantland reports how the league would plan to proceed:

Sterling would obviously have complete interest in selling the team for as much money as possible. The NBA would have a theoretical fiduciary duty to do the same, but considering Sterling would get the money, it might not be as urgent to the league as would be to him. Once more, that could be grounds for Sterling to sue, depending on the full text of the NBA constitution.

However, Lester Munson of ESPN also reported:

When Silver issues his punishment to Sterling, the decision is final. The constitution provides in Paragraph 24(m) that a commissioner’s decision shall be “final, binding, and conclusive” and shall be as final as an award of arbitration. It is almost impossible to find a judge in the United States judicial system who would set aside an award of arbitration.When Silver issues his punishment to Sterling, the decision is final. The constitution provides in Paragraph 24(m) that a commissioner’s decision shall be “final, binding, and conclusive” and shall be as final as an award of arbitration. It is almost impossible to find a judge in the United States judicial system who would set aside an award of arbitration.

That doesn’t mean Sterling can’t sue. It would just make it more difficult, though not impossible, for him to win.

If Sterling sues, he could seek a stay to remain in power and/or damages. There’s no limit on the complexity or direction a potential lawsuit would take.

It would be up to the courts to determine the merits of Sterling’s claims.

Stephen Curry says Warriors can “send a statement” by not going to White House

Associated Press
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It’s been a simmering topic all offseason: Will the Golden State Warriors — a team with a coach and several players who have publicly criticized President Donald Trump — make the traditional champions visit to the White House?

The first question is will they be invited? As of this point, that has not happened, according to the team.

However, this is something the Warriors plan to discuss and vote on as a team, coach Steve Kerr said. Stephen Curry was clear he plans to vote “no.”

Curry was more clear ESPN’s The Jump with Rachel Nichols.

“Obviously, you don’t wanna rush to a decision on understanding the magnitude of what this means. We have an opportunity to send a statement that hopefully encourages unity, encourages us to appreciate what it means to be American, and stand for something. So whatever your opinion is on either side, that’s what we wanna take advantage of this opportunity…

(Nichols asks if the statement would be not going): Yeah, for me, that’s gonna be my vote when we meet with the team. But it is a collective, it’s not just me, it’s not just KD, it’s about the whole team and what we were able to accomplish as a team, and the opportunity that has historically been afforded to championship teams. So we’ll have that conversation obviously, and we’ll do it as a group, and we’ll have one voice.

Some sports figures did not attend the traditional White House event in the past when Barack Obama was president (even if Tom Brady wants to deny that’s why he bailed), but teams have not skipped it.

There is a philosophical question here: If one opposes the president’s policies/actions, do you make more of a statement by skipping the event or going and saying something while there? What the Warriors know (having done these before) is this is just a feel-good photo-op event designed to make the president look good (whichever president). It’s a pure PR event, like the president welcoming the girl who sold the most Girl Scout cookies or something similar.  The president shakes hands and makes a couple of jokes, the team gives him a jersey with his name on it, and photos are taken. It’s not a place for serious discussion and statements, traditionally. The Warriors can either upend tradition by saying something while there, or they can just decide not to play the game.

It sounds like they are leaning toward the latter.

Which begs the question, will the Warriors even get an invite?

Report: Gerald Green to sign with Milwaukee for training camp (at least)

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How good is the hot chocolate at the BMO Harris Bradley Center?

I ask because it appears Gerald Green is going to be playing in Milwaukee, at least for training camp, according to Shams Charania of The Vertical at Yahoo Sports.

Free-agent swingman Gerald Green has agreed on a contract with the Milwaukee Bucks, league sources told The Vertical.

Green will sign a non-guaranteed deal for training camp and is expected to compete for a regular-season roster spot. Milwaukee has looked to add depth at the wing positions, bringing Green and veteran guard Brandon Rush to camp.

The Bucks have 14 guaranteed contracts, so it is Rush vs. Green for that final roster spot. Green played solidly last season in Boston despite inconsistent minutes, but was not brought back as the Celtics revamped their roster. Green shot 35.1 percent from three last season, can play decent defense, and is a good veteran presence on a team with young players.

As for why I asked about the hot chocolate…

Draymond Green: I laughed in Kevin Durant’s face over Twitter fiasco

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Kevin Durant said he hasn’t slept in two days and isn’t eating due to his Twitter fiasco.

Draymond Green – who was mocked by his Team USA teammates, including Durant, over his own Snapchat snafu – said he got revenge.

Anthony Slater of The Athletic:

Green:

It’s a little payback. I stood right there, over there, laughing in his face. And it felt pretty damn good, too.

The Warriors’ chemistry is either in a touchy spot or light years ahead.

Report: Former No. 1 pick Anthony Bennett signing with Suns

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Getting cut by the NBA-worst Nets was a low point for former No. 1 pick Anthony Bennett, but at least he had a guaranteed salary and got paid out through the end of the year.

That won’t be the case with the Suns.

Shams Charania of Yahoo Sports:

This is a no-risk flier for Phoenix. If Bennett plays well enough in the preseason, the 24-year-old will make the regular season roster. If not, the Suns won’t owe him anything.

Bennett has a chance to stick. Phoenix has just 13 players with guaranteed salaries, leaving two standard-contract spots open on the regular-season roster. Bennett will compete with Derrick Jones Jr., Elijah Millsap, Peter Jok and anyone else the Suns sign.

I don’t love Bennett’s odds. He hasn’t looked like an NBA player, and he’s reaching the age where current production matters more than potential. But by virtue of being the top pick a few years ago, he carries more intrigue than the typical player of his caliber.