Paul Pierce, DeMar DeRozan

Raptors use fast start, strong finish to even the series with Game 4 win over Nets


Through the first three games of the first round series between the Nets and the Raptors, Toronto had no answer for Joe Johnson, who was simply killing them offensively.

Johnson had scored 24, 18 and 29 points respectively in each of the first three games, while shooting better than 60 percent from the field whether the looks were from inside, outside, or somewhere in between.

But the Raptors adjusted in Game 4, sending hard double teams at Johnson whenever he received the ball in the post, and forced his teammates to beat them with ball movement, crisp passing, and high percentage shooting from anyone but the player Kevin Garnett nicknamed Joe Jesus earlier in the season.

The plan worked to perfection. Johnson was held to just seven points on 2-of-7 shooting in 42 minutes of action, and the Nets managed just 12 fourth quarter points as Toronto came away with an 87-79 victory that evened the series at two games apiece.

Johnson isn’t the only weapon the Nets possess, but his being taken completely out of the offensive attack wrecked the rhythm for the rest of his teammates. Brooklyn started off on its heels, allowing 35 first quarter points to its opponent before settling down a bit and really containing Toronto just fine the rest of the way, allowing only 52 points in total over the game’s final three periods.

But offense was a problem for a Nets team that, theoretically, should have plenty of options. Paul Pierce led the way with 22 points on 9-of-14 shooting, and Mirza Teletovic probably should have seen more than 16 minutes off the bench, considering he was 5-of-9 from the field with 12 points in that very short span. But Deron Williams wasn’t nearly the aggressor he was in Game 3, and finished just 4-of-12 from the field for 10 points in over 36 minutes of action, to go along with six assists against five turnovers.

DeMar DeRozan had 20 points by halftime, but was 0-for-7 from the field the rest of the way. Kyle Lowry and Greivis Vasquez did the damage in the second half, but there wasn’t all that much needed considering the dismal output of the anemic Brooklyn offense.

All along this has felt like Brooklyn’s series to lose, and Game 4 was no exception, as the home team clawed back from an early 17-point deficit somewhat easily. But the Nets will have to find a way to get Johnson back on track offensively, or create some sets which take advantage of the double teams he’s seeing in order to get his teammates some easy, uncontested looks.

On the Raptors side, they’re feeling just fine after reclaiming homecourt advantage, with two of the remaining three games in the series being played in Toronto, if all seven are necessary in order to decide it. Sunday’s Game 4 more than any of the others showed the blueprint defensively for the Raptors — shut down two of the Nets’ three main threats, and the series can be theirs.

Sixers to retire Moses Malone’s number next season

Darryl Dawkins, Moses Malone

Kobe Bryant‘s pregame tribute video stole the show in Philadelphia, but Tuesday night was Moses Malone tribute night. The former league MVP and Hall of Famer passed away in September, and his legacy was honored by the Sixers during a halftime ceremony. During the festivities, Malone’s son announced that his No. 2 will be retired by the organization next season.

There’s no question that Malone, one of the greatest players in the history of the sport, deserves to have his number retired. The only relevant question is: why didn’t this happen years ago? The ceremony next season should be good, but it would have been better if they had done it when Malone was alive to participate in it. No Sixers player has worn No. 2 since Malone anyway, but it’s been over 20 years since he last wore a Sixers jersey. Why couldn’t they have found some time in those two decades to have a ceremony and hang a banner?

LeBron James with two-handed halfcourt bounce pass for assist (VIDEO)

LeBron James
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Perhaps LeBron James‘ most underappreciated skill has been his passing. He is rightly hailed as the most unselfish superstar of his generation, but being a willing passer is only part of it: he’s also as good at it as any point guard in the league. Case in point: this two-handed halfcourt bounce pass on Tuesday night, finding Richard Jefferson for an easy dunk:

Kobe gets great introduction, loud ovation in Philadelphia

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Kobe Bryant‘s relationship with his hometown of Philadelphia had its rocky sections — the Kobe’s Lakers beat the Sixers in the 2001 Finals, and then Kobe was booed during the 2002 All-Star Game —  but all was forgiven on Tuesday night.

In his final trip to Philly, he was given a framed Lower Merion High School jersey — that’s Kobe’s school, in case you forgot — and it was presented by Dr. J.

Then the fans welcomed him like you see above.

That pumped up Kobe, who scored 13 first quarter points on 5-of-10 shooting, his best quarter of the season.

Rumor: Nets testing trade waters for Bojan Bogdanovic

Bojan Bogdanovic, Otto Porter Jr.
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If you play for the Brooklyn Nets, and your name is not Rondae Hollis-Jefferson, expect you will come up in trade rumors this season.

First up on the block, Bojan Bogdanovic. The report comes from Mike Mazzeo of ESPN.

Bogdanovic is in the first year of a three-year, $11 million deal, which isn’t bad for a guy playing nearly 25 minutes a night and scoring 8.4 points per game. There is a lot of potential in his game, if developed in the right setting — he’s a good shooter out on the wing who works well off the ball. He seems to have regressed this season, but how much of that is due to the Nets and their guard play (and just generally struggling) is up for debate.

Is there going to be interest in him? Probably. As always, it is about the price, what the Nets will demand. Whether the Nets can get anything back they want is up for debate.

Right now a lot of GMs are testing the waters for players, judging the market. That is a long way from a trade happening. But don’t be shocked if the Nets make a deal or two before the February deadline.