Memphis’ defense, discipline propel them past Thunder in overtime, lead series 2-1

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Whatever Russell Westbrook wants to call the arena in Memphis, it’s going to show up in his nightmares now.

Westbrook and Kevin Durant combined for 60 points but shot a combined 34 percent and were 4-of-21 from three — there is no third scoring option that Memphis fears (or should fear) and if those two aren’t efficient you can contain the Thunder. Especially when the Thunder offense becomes stagnant and their shot selection is poor.

Which is exactly what happened for three-and-a-half quarters and had Memphis in complete control of the game… and then things got crazy.The Thunder went on a 17-0 fourth quarter run and tied the game up. Memphis got back-to-back buckets from Tony Allen. Oklahoma City got a four-point play when Allen fouled Westbrook on a three. Then we all got overtime.

That overtime saw the Grizzlies go up 5 and hang on as the Thunder missed more good look threes at the end and Memphis hung on for a 98-95 win.

That gives the Grizzlies a 2-1 lead in the series, with Game 4 at their place Saturday night. Memphis is in control of this series and can take a stranglehold of it with a win.

This is the second game in a row where the Grizzlies blew a big lead but didn’t lose their heads (despite a couple of silly fouls by Tony Allen) — even after that ugly fourth quarter stretch they got back to their game and executed.

Oklahoma City looked scattered. And they missed a lot of good looks on the night on the road. They were not the composed team. You saw why in the first half — and why the FedEx Forum is The Grindhouse no matter what Westbrook thinks.

The Grizzlies’ defense contested seemingly everything in the first half. Oklahoma City scored 36 points on 36.8 percent shooting in the first half, with just five fast break points. Kevin Durant had 12 points on 4-of-9 shooting, Russell Westbrook had 9, Serge Ibaka had 8, and combined that trio shot 45.8 percent. The rest of the Thunder combined had 7 points on 3-of-14 shooting.

This looked like a blowout before things just got ridiculous.

Oklahoma City found its offensive game and a sense of desperation. The Grizzlies seemed to play the clock not the opponent — they would go deep into the shot clock to eat up time before starting their set, but that just led to bad shots. The result was no Memphis points for more than six minutes and a 17-0 OKC run to tie the game at 81-81.

But Memphis didn’t lose it’s head — Allen made a good drive for a dunk, then on the Thunder’s ensuing possession Allen stole a lazy Westbrook pass to Durant and t with a fast break finish the Grizzlies were up four.

Then this happened.

The score was soon tied and, after both teams missed opportunities, we were headed to overtime.

Durant scored first in the OT but then the Grizzlies went on a 7-0 run. That was the game breaker. In overtime again the Grizzlies were able to get good looks and get stops. They were disciplined and true to themselves, and they got the win.

Mike Conley had another brilliant game with 20 points on 14 shots. Tony Allen and Zach Randolph each had 16 points (but it took 20 shots to do it). Marc Gasol had 14 points and was an offensive lynchpin for long stretches of the game.

On the other side Ibaka finished with 12 points and was only one of three Thunder players in double figures.

There is not one simple issue for the Thunder — they miss a third shot creator, their sets can be unimaginative and too easy to guard, their defense has been lacking. All of those are part of the last two losses. But the Thunder is a team capable of big spurts and big shots, capable of winning big games on the road.

Oklahoma City’s real biggest problem is that Memphis is a very good team, and one that is a matchup problem for them.

Watch Kobe Bryant’s ‘Dear Basketball’ short film (video)

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Kobe Bryant announced his retirement in a letter called “Dear Basketball,” which was made into a short film.

Now, on the day the Lakers retire his Nos. 8 and 24, you can watch it. It’s quite beautiful:

Double number retirement fitting for Kobe Bryant

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Kobe Bryant’s career truly occurred in two acts.

He was Shaquille O’Neal’s super sidekick for three championships. Then, Kobe led the Lakers to another two titles himself after Shaq departed.

He was an athletic, high-flying slam-dunk-contest champion. Then, he became known for his cerebral play and footwork.

He faced trial for rape in Colorado (the case was ultimately dismissed, and he settled civilly), blame for Shaq getting traded and criticism for being too selfish when the Lakers struggled in the aftermath of Shaq’s departure. Then, Kobe – still beloved by his fans – again became a socially acceptable marketing force.

His 2007 trade request serves as the more accurate intermission point, but his 2006 jersey change from No. 8 to No. 24 works well enough. He had a Hall of Fame career in No. 8 then a borderline Hall of Fame career in No. 24. Think Tracy Mcgrady’s career followed by Bernard King’s – but it was just Kobe followed by Kobe and with far more postseason success.

Here are the win-share leaders with a single franchise during Kobe’s career:

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So much about Kobe is excessive – his accolades, his shot selection, his reputation as clutch. He had an all-time great career, but the myth outpaces reality.

Yet, Kobe becoming the first player with two numbers retired by the same team – which the Lakers will do at halftime tonight – feels incredibly appropriate. In his 20-year career with the Lakers, Kobe had time to succeed then succeed again in an extravagant way only he could manage.

He was dedicated and disciplined, flashy and fastidious, No. 8 and No. 24

Warriors will watch Kobe Bryant’s numbers get retired, Lakers might not

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The Lakers will retire Kobe Bryant’s No. 8 and No. 24 at halftime of their game against Warriors tonight.

The road team won’t miss it. The home team might.

Golden State coach Steve Kerr, via Monte Poole of NBC Sports Bay Area:

“I want our guys to see it,” Kerr said Saturday. “It’ll be a pretty cool moment.

“Just to experience of one of the greatest players in the history of the game getting his jersey retired and we happen to be there? I’m not going to keep them in the locker room watching tape from the first half. The players would look at me like I was nuts.”

Lakers coach Luke Walton, via Harrison Faigen of Lakers Nation:

“I hadn’t thought much about [watching the ceremony],” Walton said Sunday. “We’re still deciding how we’ll approach halftime.

“Our first priority is still the job that we have. I’m sure there’s going to be some halftime adjustments we need to make against the Warriors. We’re toying with a couple different ideas to let guys at least see part of it.”

Kerr seems like a pretty cool guy, someone who understands what truly matters. This will be a historic moment, and that can take priority over watching video for one night in a long season.

But he also has the luxury of coaching an all-time great team. Even with Stephen Curry, Draymond Green, Zaza Pachulia and Shaun Livingston injured, the Warriors are favored.

Walton has a young team that needs every break it can get. But he too should embrace the significance of the ceremony. His franchise is.

After reportedly initially being scheduled for pregame, the ceremony will occur at halftime. The NBA implemented a hard 15-minute limit on halftimes this season. Any team not ready will be assessed a delay-of-game penalty. So, lengthy speeches tonight could hinder the current team on the court. And that’s well worth the cost of doing business.

In the same regard, current Lakers watching Kobe’s ceremony would gain pride in being a Laker. There’s real value in that, probably more than in going over adjustments for a December game during a season very likely to end outside the playoffs regardless.

George Hill nails half-court buzzer-beater with less than a second to shoot (video)

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I bet this made George Hill happier.

The Kings still losing to the Raptors, 108-93, probably didn’t, though.