LeBron James, Al Jefferson

Bobcats fight to the end, but Heat come away with 2-0 series lead


The Heat continued their quest to reach a fourth straight Finals with a 101-97 Game 2 win over the Bobcats on Wednesday, and despite the fact that the game never really felt like it was in jeopardy for the defending champs, Charlotte kept fighting as though it was, and did so until the final buzzer sounded.

It was largely a pedestrian performance by Miami, which is to be expected to a certain extent at this early stage of the postseason, given all that’s at stake. And that was more than enough to get the victory, one that has the team now 14 wins away from winning a third straight title.

But this game wasn’t really about the Heat victory, at least in terms of an interesting story. Instead, it was the resiliency of the Bobcats that was intriguing, and the way they continued to fight back time and again even when it seemed as though all was lost.

The biggest fighter was the team’s best player. Al Jefferson sustained a foot injury in Game 1 that saw him leave the arena in a walking boot, and he was determined to play though it with the assistance of painkillers in this one. Jefferson left in the first half after feeling like he might have suffered an additional tear, yet returned to end up playing more than 40 minutes, while finishing with 18 points and 13 rebounds.

Valiant doesn’t begin to describe Jefferson’s effort, and his teammates seemed to be energized by his courage. Charlotte continually cut Miami leads to within striking distance in the second half — a 14-point Heat lead midway through the fourth was cut to just four two minutes later, and when Miami had it back to eight with 2:30 remaining, the Bobcats had it down to a single point following a three from Kemba Walker with 11 seconds left.

LeBron James hit two free throws on the ensuing possession after being fouled intentionally, and Chris Douglas-Roberts turned the ball over on Charlotte’s final offensive possession, which ended up sealing the win for the Heat.

It’s hard to explain the feeling of this game in real time if you weren’t watching it live, but trust us — Miami was in no real danger of dropping this one, despite the close score near the end. The Heat cruised to a postseason victory by performing far below their maximum level, while the Bobcats kept fighting and kept scrapping, all the while playing as though they truly had nothing to lose.

Watch Kobe Bryant’s entire retirement-announcement press conference (video)

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Kobe Bryant reflected, told stories and showed his emotions.

For nearly 25 minutes, the Lakers star talked about his pending retirement. It was pretty cool.

Report: Wizards signing Ryan Hollins

Blake Griffin, Ryan Hollins
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Nene hurt his calf. Drew Gooden is banged up. Martell Webster is out for the season.

Those are three players the Wizards expected to play power forward this season.

So, Washington – which has lost four straight – will bring in another big man: Ryan Hollins.

Shams Charania of Yahoo Sports:

The Wizards have a full roster of 15 players. They don’t qualify for a hardship exemption, which a team gets if four players have missed three straight games and will continue to be out. Only Webster and Alan Anderson definitely fit that bill. Gooden, who has missed five straight, might. But it’s unclear both how many of those absences were due to injury and when he’ll return.

So, Washington will have to waive someone to sign Hollins now. It’ll probably be Webster, whose $5,845,250 2016-17 salary is just $2.5 million guaranteed. If he’s out for the year and the Wizards plan to drop him by the summer to clear cap space, why not just do it now?

Hollins is more center than power forward and doesn’t appear to fit well with Marcin Gortat. But at this point, Washington just needs big bodies. Hollins – a nine-year veteran who plays decent interior defense, lacks offensive skill and rebounds poorly for his 7-foot frame – is at least that.

Dwight Howard crushes Kristaps Porzingis with dunk (video)

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Sometimes – as Kristaps Porzingis sees against Dwight Howard – it’s more flattering just to play James Harden-level defense.