Kevin Ollie, Steve Kerr

Report: Steve Kerr would rather coach West Coast team than Knicks

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The Steve Kerr-to-the-Knicks story has really gotten out ahead of itself.

Not only does Phil Jackson reportedly want to hire Kerr as New York’s head coach, Kerr reportedly wants the position.

Yet, each side continue to express interest in the other through the media. Why not just make the hire?

Howard Beck of Bleacher Report:

Kerr is eying several potential openings around the league, according to sources, and he would prefer to stay on (or near) the West Coast. Kerr lives in San Diego, and he has a daughter attending college at Cal, in Berkeley. Contrary to a New York Post report, Kerr has not asked TNT for schedule flexibility in order to take the Knicks job, according to two sources with Turner Sports. (Disclosure: Turner also owns Bleacher Report.)

I count three West Coast jobs with potential openings: Lakers, Warriors and Trail Blazers. Plus, Utah – which, unlike those three, actually has a vacancy – is actually closed to San Diego than Portland.

It would shock nobody if the Lakers fire Mike D’Antoni, but after years of not re-hiring Jackson, why would they go for a Jackson disciple? If the Lakers wanted to move on from the Jackson era, that’s at least understandable. But turning to someone like Kerr rather than just hiring Jackson in the first place is not.

The Warriors should not fire Mark Jackson, even though, in nearly every way besides on-court performance, his Warriors look dysfunctional. Rifts with assistant coaches, strange and needless disputes with players, defensive bursts with the media. But on-court performance matters a great deal, and Jackson just led Golden State to its best record in 22 years and has its best overall coaching record since Bill Sharman (1966-68).

Similarly, despite leaving the question open, the Trail Blazers probably won’t dump Terry Stotts. I’m not as high on Stotts’ coaching ability as others, but he just helped Portland end a two-season playoff drought by going 54-28 in a tough conference. He definitely deserves the benefit of the doubt – and a contract extension.

That leaves Utah, which could be a good fit. As I wrote yesterday, the Jazz could look for a promising coach who lacks experience and needs a season to grow on the job. That’s Kerr, who has never coached. If Utah general manager Dennis Lindsey wants a defensive-minded and analytical coach, Kerr could certainly fit.

But that’s only one opening, and maybe the Jazz don’t have interest in Kerr.

That brings us back to the Knicks, whom Beck reports are also interested in Iowa State coach Fred Hoiberg and and Connecticut coach Kevin Ollie. Beck:

Hoiberg never played for Jackson, but did play in the triangle offense for the Bulls, under Tim Floyd. Hoiberg has made a name for himself at Iowa State and Jackson “thinks highly of him,” according to one source. Jackson also likes Ollie, who guided Connecticut to the 2014 national championship.

“He’s going to talk to a lot of people,” a league source said of Jackson.

If I were hiring an NBA coach, I’d like those two, too. They’ve done fantastic jobs in college, coaching with styles that would seemingly translate well to the NBA. That both had lengthy NBA careers at least relaxes my usual concerns about college coaches moving up to the NBA.

But, really, this seems like more posturing. I still predict Kerr will become the Knicks’ next coach. There’s too much smoke here to project anyone else taking the job.

If I had to guess, the Knicks and Kerr are just trying to create the illusion of uncertainty. One, it gives the appearance the Knicks are being thorough in their search. Two, it protects Kerr from criticism for being hastily hired or getting the job due to his relationship with Jackson rather than his coaching acumen.

Eventually, the Knicks and/or Kerr must commit to wanting to join forces. Then, we’ll know how the other side truly feels.

Will Jonathan Isaac jump from high school to NBA draft?

AP Photo/Kathy Willens
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Satnam Singh, the Mavericks No. 52 pick in the 2015 draft, was the first player drafted directly from high school in a decade.

Another, much higher-profile, high schooler could follow his path.

The NBA’s “one-and-done” rule effectively prohibited anyone from jumping from high school to the NBA. Amir Johnson, whom the Pistons drafted No. 56 in 2005, was the last high school player drafted before the rule was implemented.

But Singh spent five years at IMG Academy in Florida and was eligible. Now, another IMG player wants to follow a similar path.

Pete Thamel of Sports Illustrated:

In a decision that could signal a new avenue to the NBA for elite American basketball players, Top 10 high school prospect Jonathan Isaac told Sports Illustrated on Friday that he will explore declaring for the 2016 NBA draft directly from prep school.

Isaac, a 6’10” small forward from IMG (Fla.) Academy, said in a phone interview that he expects to take advantage of a new rule that allows prospects to enter the NBA draft and return to college if they don’t feel good about their projected draft position. The new rule allows Isaac to participate in the NBA draft combine, hold an NBA workout and pull out of the draft without compromising his amateur standing at Florida State, where he’s signed to play next season.

Isaac, 18, and IMG officials expect that he’ll be eligible for the 2016 NBA draft because he started high school in 2011, which would make him one year removed from his initial graduating class. Isaac did not graduate from high school in 2015, but IMG officials expect he’d be eligible because former IMG player Satnam Singh had a similar circumstance and was eligible for the 2015 Draft.

Isaac is a potential first-rounder. The new rule doesn’t affect his ability to declare for the draft, but rather his ability to withdraw and play for Florida state IF he declares for the draft.

The bigger question: Can he declare for the draft?

The relevant requirement in the Collective Bargaining Agreement:

The player (A) is or will be at least nineteen (19) years of age during the calendar year in which the Draft is held, and (B) with respect to a player who is not an international player (defined below), at least one (1) NBA Season has elapsed since the player’s graduation from high school (or, if the player did not graduate from high school, since the graduation of the class with which the player would have graduated had he graduated from high school

Isaac turns 19 in October, so he’d meet the age requirement. He also hasn’t graduated high school, so he could claim his class graduated last year – four years after entering high school.

However, that argument works only if he doesn’t graduate this spring. If he does, that takes precedence over his class’s graduation, and he’d have to wait another year to declare for the draft.

As crazy as this sounds, Isaac will have more options for his professional future by NOT graduating high school.

This passage in the Collective Bargaining Agreement should probably be changed in the next edition.

It’s also difficult to tell how this situation compares with Singh. Although academics kept him from receiving college scholarships, Singh graduated from IMG, according to his father. Perhaps, Singh didn’t actually graduate. A quote from his dad isn’t a verified transcript.

No matter how Singh got to the draft, Isaac and those close to him at IMG should know the details of the path.

Now, it’s a question whether Isaac can and will follow.

Kevin Durant chokes up talking about Monty Williams’ wife (video)

Oklahoma Thunder players, from left, Cameron Payne, Kevin Durant, Andrew Morrow and D.J. Augustin bow their heads during a moment of silence for Ingrid Williams, the wife of Thunder assistant coach Monty Williams, who died Wednesday as the result of a car accident Tuesday, before an NBA basketball game between the New Orleans Pelicans and the Oklahoma City Thunder, in Oklahoma City, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
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OKLAHOMA CITY — The Oklahoma City Thunder held a moment of silence for assistant coach Monty Williams’ wife before their game against the New Orleans Pelicans on Thursday night, a day after she died following a car crash.

Williams coached New Orleans last season, and the Pelicans also held a moment of silence for Ingrid Williams before their game Wednesday night against Utah.

The family’s pastor, Dr. Mark Hitchcock of Faith Bible Church in Edmond prayed for the family.

Thunder star Kevin Durant was overcome with emotion as he reflected after the morning shootaround.

“Just love Coach Monty so much, man,” Durant said. “I feel for him, man. It’s somebody we all love.”

Thunder coach Billy Donovan said it would be different Thursday without Williams to his right, but the team had no choice but to prepare for the game.

“I thought our group this morning was as good as it could be coming in,” Donovan said. “Everybody, I think, personally, is hurting for Monty and his family. Just trying to have faith right now that Ingrid is in a better place, and hopeful that our guys will come out there and play to the best of their ability.”

Ingrid Williams, 44, was involved in a crash Tuesday night. An oncoming car crossed the center line and hit her SUV just outside of downtown Oklahoma City, said police Capt. Paco Valderrama. That driver was pronounced dead at the scene, Valderrama said.

Monty Williams was hired by New Orleans to his first and only head coaching job in 2010 and fired after last season. He helped guide the Pelicans to the postseason twice and had a record of 173-221.

Pelicans star Anthony Davis spent three seasons with Williams as his coach and said Ingrid Williams was important, too. He said in a tweet: “Completely devastated. Ingrid Williams was like a 2nd mother to me when I got to NOLA. My thoughts & prayers are with Monty & the family.”

First-year Pelicans coach Alvin Gentry said Ingrid’s impact was significant. It really affected his team as it prepared for its game Wednesday night, and the players were still dealing with it Thursday.

“It was really difficult for our guys to get through it because he (Monty Williams) has had such an impact on the players, and she had even more of an impact, maybe, with the mothering that she did for most of the guys and the type of person that she was,” Gentry said. “She wanted everybody to feel like they had a home away from home.”

Suns spin Markieff Morris-Archie Goodwin scuffle as brotherly bickering

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Markieff Morris got into a physical altercation with teammate Archie Goodwin during the Suns loss to the Warriors yesterday.

Then, Morris flipped off a Phoenix fan.

This might not have been a low point for the Suns, who’ve had a miserable season due in part to Morris problems. But if it wasn’t, it was close.

At least everyone was on the same page in characterizing the scuffle (videos via Bright Side of the Sun):

Suns coach Earl Watson:

There was one point in the year where those two lived together. They’re closest on the team. They’re like big brother, little brother.

We have to control our emotions. Other than that, those two are really close. There’s no in between. The team is not split. Those two are the closest on the team. They have a bond. They have a unique relationship.

I wouldn’t saying it was a fight. I would say it was a pushing match, what I saw. I’ve never seen NBA players really fight.

Markieff was trying to motivate Archie.

Morris:

That’s nothing. That’s part of being a leader, being a big brother. Sometimes, big brothers and little brothers get into it.

What happened wasn’t supposed to happen. Wrong place, wrong time. But that’s my little brother. I’ve been here with him for three years, and I know him really well. I know his family, and we’re a little closer. And it happens sometimes.

Big brothers shake little brothers up sometimes. It happens.

No, it don’t look good. But nothing I do is going to look good. Like I’m telling you all, it’s between us. We’re family.

Like I said, I apologized to him. And I like I said, that’s my little brother. We’re going to move forward, no hard feelings.

[What Goodwin said when Morris apologized] I love you. That’s what I said to him. No hard feelings.

Ain’t no, ain’t any of that bull, BS be talking about choking somebody.

Goodwin:

Family. It happens. I love him like a brother. He loves me. That’s all there is to say about it. No more comments.

When someone asked him about Morris choking him, Goodwin walked away.

I’m not sold on the choking charges. You can pause the video at the right moment, and Morris’ hand is on Goodwin’s neck. But it’s quick, and it’s while Goodwin is standing up. I don’t see credible evidence Morris tried to choke Goodwin.

But these quotes paint a far rosier picture than the video presented. I’m hardly convinced everything is as hunky dory as the Suns say. There was a lot of frustration behind that dispute.

That said, it’s meaningful Morris and Goodwin both told the same “brother” story – true or not. At best, it’s accurate, and they’ll be fine going forward. At worst, they were cool enough with each other to present a nice message to the public.

And even if it’s that worst-case scenario, that’s far better than what could’ve been – especially for Phoenix this season.

Reports: Raptors looking hard for power forward upgrade at trade deadline

Al Horford Thaddeus Young
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There are precious few windows in the NBA when everything comes together for a franchise and it can make a deep playoff run (well, unless you’re the Spurs). When those opportunities arise, teams have to grab them. Carpe Diem.

The Toronto Raptors are the clear second-best team in the Eastern Conference, and the top seed Cavaliers do not look invincible. But the Raptors have a glaring hole in their lineup at the power forward spot. The Raptors start veteran Luis Scola, but they are 10 points per 100 possessions better when he is off the court than on it — not one Raptors lineup with Scola and center Jonas Valanciunas has a positive plus-minus this season. They have Patrick Patterson off the bench, but he has a limited offensive game that would cause matchup issues in the postseason.

The Raptors want to seize their moment — expect them to be active at the trade deadline trying to upgrade at the four.

Ryan Wolstat of the Toronto Sun said that in a recent ProBasketballTalk podcast. He said their ideal player would be Al Horford of the Atlanta Hawks. However, if the Hawks decide to keep him or the price is too high, the Raptors are looking at other options as well, something Brian Windhorst discussed in a recent radio conversation in Toronto, as transcribed by The Brooklyn Game.

“I think they’re gonna go for it. I think from what I understand, from what I’m hearing, they’re pretty aggressive in the trade market. They’re looking for power forwards. I’ve heard them attached to Thaddeus Young. I’ve heard them attached to (Nuggets forward) Kenneth Faried. I’ve heard them attached to (Suns forward) Markieff Morris. They have extra draft picks. I wouldn’t trade that New York Knicks pick unless it was for a blockbuster acquisition, because you can’t protect it, you can’t protect another team’s pick. I would do it if I could put, like, a top-five protection on it. But you can’t do that. You can’t say, allright, we’ll give you two of our picks if it falls in the top five. But they have assets to do it. They have some young players.”.

The Nuggets have tested the market for Faried, and he is available, his energy/glue-guy game would pair well with Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan. Although, if I were Rockets GM Masai Ujiri and I was talking to Denver, the name Danilo Gallinari would come up a lot, more often than Faried. His shooting and pick-and-pop skills would fit with the Raptors guards well.

Young would be a good fit and an upgrade. Morris could be an improvement on the court, and he’s on a reasonable contract, but there are concerns about time he could miss (suspension and maybe jail) for a pending felony assault case with his brother Marcus.  The Raptors also need to ask themselves if they have the right internal structure and locker room leadership to provide the support/guidance teams need if they bring Morris on — something incidents Wednesday night emphasized. But Morris is better than anyone on the Raptors’ roster.

The Raptors have multiple first-round picks coming up they can move, the New York park would have to be included in a Horford deal but not necessarily the others. There are also young players that the team is high on, such as Lucas Nogueira, that could be moved in the right deal.

Raptors fans were angry last season at the deadline when Ujiri didn’t pull the trigger on any deals, but that seemed the right move at the time. The Raptors were a few steps away from the top rung of the East, and the reported deals would not have changed that picture.

This season feels different. Expect a bold move out of Toronto during or after All-Star weekend. Carpe Diem.