Kevin Ollie, Steve Kerr

Report: Steve Kerr would rather coach West Coast team than Knicks

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The Steve Kerr-to-the-Knicks story has really gotten out ahead of itself.

Not only does Phil Jackson reportedly want to hire Kerr as New York’s head coach, Kerr reportedly wants the position.

Yet, each side continue to express interest in the other through the media. Why not just make the hire?

Howard Beck of Bleacher Report:

Kerr is eying several potential openings around the league, according to sources, and he would prefer to stay on (or near) the West Coast. Kerr lives in San Diego, and he has a daughter attending college at Cal, in Berkeley. Contrary to a New York Post report, Kerr has not asked TNT for schedule flexibility in order to take the Knicks job, according to two sources with Turner Sports. (Disclosure: Turner also owns Bleacher Report.)

I count three West Coast jobs with potential openings: Lakers, Warriors and Trail Blazers. Plus, Utah – which, unlike those three, actually has a vacancy – is actually closed to San Diego than Portland.

It would shock nobody if the Lakers fire Mike D’Antoni, but after years of not re-hiring Jackson, why would they go for a Jackson disciple? If the Lakers wanted to move on from the Jackson era, that’s at least understandable. But turning to someone like Kerr rather than just hiring Jackson in the first place is not.

The Warriors should not fire Mark Jackson, even though, in nearly every way besides on-court performance, his Warriors look dysfunctional. Rifts with assistant coaches, strange and needless disputes with players, defensive bursts with the media. But on-court performance matters a great deal, and Jackson just led Golden State to its best record in 22 years and has its best overall coaching record since Bill Sharman (1966-68).

Similarly, despite leaving the question open, the Trail Blazers probably won’t dump Terry Stotts. I’m not as high on Stotts’ coaching ability as others, but he just helped Portland end a two-season playoff drought by going 54-28 in a tough conference. He definitely deserves the benefit of the doubt – and a contract extension.

That leaves Utah, which could be a good fit. As I wrote yesterday, the Jazz could look for a promising coach who lacks experience and needs a season to grow on the job. That’s Kerr, who has never coached. If Utah general manager Dennis Lindsey wants a defensive-minded and analytical coach, Kerr could certainly fit.

But that’s only one opening, and maybe the Jazz don’t have interest in Kerr.

That brings us back to the Knicks, whom Beck reports are also interested in Iowa State coach Fred Hoiberg and and Connecticut coach Kevin Ollie. Beck:

Hoiberg never played for Jackson, but did play in the triangle offense for the Bulls, under Tim Floyd. Hoiberg has made a name for himself at Iowa State and Jackson “thinks highly of him,” according to one source. Jackson also likes Ollie, who guided Connecticut to the 2014 national championship.

“He’s going to talk to a lot of people,” a league source said of Jackson.

If I were hiring an NBA coach, I’d like those two, too. They’ve done fantastic jobs in college, coaching with styles that would seemingly translate well to the NBA. That both had lengthy NBA careers at least relaxes my usual concerns about college coaches moving up to the NBA.

But, really, this seems like more posturing. I still predict Kerr will become the Knicks’ next coach. There’s too much smoke here to project anyone else taking the job.

If I had to guess, the Knicks and Kerr are just trying to create the illusion of uncertainty. One, it gives the appearance the Knicks are being thorough in their search. Two, it protects Kerr from criticism for being hastily hired or getting the job due to his relationship with Jackson rather than his coaching acumen.

Eventually, the Knicks and/or Kerr must commit to wanting to join forces. Then, we’ll know how the other side truly feels.

Watch LaMarcus Aldridge drop 38 on Thunder

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Oklahoma City has more than a few adjustments to make after a brutal defensive effort in Game 1 of their series against San Antonio, but at the top of the list is sticking with LaMarcus Aldridge on defense.

He was killing them from the midrange, and more than half of his looks were uncontested — the Thunder know he can knock down that shot, right?

It was a fantastic performance from Aldridge; we’ll see if he faces tougher defense in Game 2.

NBA: Trail Blazers scored after uncalled illegal screen by Trail Blazers in final minutes

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Should we be preparing for Game 7 of the Trail Blazers-Clippers series today?

If the officials had called the final minutes of the last game correctly, maybe.

Portland won Game 6 to take the series 4-2, but a missed call a key missed call helped clinch.

With 1:45 left, Mason Plumlee got away with offensively fouling Jamal Crawford, according to the NBA’s Last Two Minute Report:

Plumlee (POR) sets the screen on Crawford (LAC) without giving him room to avoid the contact.

A correct call would’ve meant a Trail Blazers turnover. Instead, Damian Lillard ended the possession with two made free throws.

Portland’s advantage when the Clippers began intentionally fouling: two.

Would the Clippers have won if the refs called Plumlee’s offensive foul? Impossible to say. The final 1:45 could’ve played out much differently.

But this missed call, the only error in the Last Two Minute Report, certainly boosted the Trail Blazers’ odds.

Four Things to Watch in two Game 7s Sunday

during game six of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals of the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Time Warner Cable Arena on April 29, 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.
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It’s what the playoffs are all about — win or go home Game 7s. Pressure, drama, unlikely stars Sunday is going to have it all. Here are a few things to watch:

1) Can Miami’s jump shooters have another hot game? Dwyane Wade got the headlines (and he earned them) for his Game 6 performance (everyone except purple shirt guy was impressed), but the real key for the Heat to force a Game 7 was they were hitting their jumpers — or at least enough of them. In their three losses, Miami shot 33.7 percent from 3 feet out to the arc, but in Game 6 the Heat shot 43.5 percent in that range, plus knocked down eight threes. The Hornets have packed the paint all series, when the Heat hit their jumpers they win. It’s that simple.

2) Does Kemba Walker have one more big game in him? Walker was fantastic in Game 6 (37 points), and he’s been very good in the Hornets’ victories. He’s going to penetrate and get some shots inside eight feet, but will he be able to finish? And, more importantly, will he hit his threes when they pack the paint on him? If Walker has a huge game, Charlotte very likely moves on.

3) Is Toronto too far into their own head? No team has more pressure on them to advance out of the first round than Toronto after two previous years of getting bounced in the first round, and they will feel that weight at home in Game 7 against Indiana. Will Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan step up with big games in the biggest moments of their careers, or will they succumb to the moment and the Pacers defense? For all the Xs and Os that do matter in this game, how the Raptors handle the pressure will be key.

4) Can the Pacers again get a few quality minutes when Paul George sits? In the Pacers comfortable Game 6 win, George got a rest in the second quarter and the Pacers were +5 while he sat. That was a huge step up from Game 5, where the Pacers were -18 when he was out for less than 7 minutes. If Indiana — by playing some starters such as Myles Turner — doesn’t have a huge bench drop off when George rests a few minutes their odds of winning go way up. We know Paul George can handle the moment.

Spurs demolish Thunder to take Game 1 of second-round series

SAN ANTONIO,TX - APRIL 30: LaMarcus Aldridge #12 of the San Antonio Spurs scores over Steven Adams #12 of the Oklahoma City Thunder during game one of the Western Conference Semifinals for the 2016 NBA Playoffs at AT&T Center on April 30, 2016 in San Antonio, Texas. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that , by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Ronald Cortes/Getty Images)
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The second round was supposed to be when things got exciting. Instead, the San Antonio Spurs put on an absolute clinic at home, blowing out the Oklahoma City Thunder, 124-92 to take a 1-0 series lead.

Just about everything went in for San Antonio, particularly for LaMarcus Aldridge and Kawhi Leonard, who combined for 63 points. How dominant were they?

Aldridge in particular got anything he wanted against the Thunder. Oklahoma City’s stars were quiet, with Kevin Durant scoring just 16 points and Russell Westbrook 14. San Antonio controlled the game from the start and Oklahoma City never recovered from the opening punch.

It’s hard to imagine Durant and Westbrook are this ineffective again, and hopefully the rest of this series will be a little more competitive. But the Spurs did what the Spurs do, and did nothing to shake the feeling that they’re the favorites to win the west, now that Stephen Curry‘s status is unknown.