Pacers bounce back with blowout Game 2 win over Hawks

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Despite the legitimate troubles faced by the Pacers over the second half of the season, they still managed to finish with the one seed in the East.

They temporarily squandered the privileges that come with that accomplishment  in an embarrassing Game 1 performance against the Hawks, and for a while, looked as though they might suffer the same fate in Game 2. But something changed at halftime, and Indiana finally played to their potential. The Pacers closed the third on a 24-6 run, and never looked back on the way to a 101-85 victory that evened the series at a game apiece.

The run was actually much bigger than that, and began in the second quarter.

Indiana trailed early, in part because the same things that hurt them in Game 1 continued to be a problem at the start. There was no answer for Jeff Teague, who put up seven points, five rebounds and three assists in less than 10 first quarter minutes. The Hawks got off eight three-point attempts in the first 12 minutes (which is a mission of theirs) and knocked down four of them.

But the Pacers chipped away before halftime, and used the top-ranked defense in the league to put this game away in the third. It was a 52-27 run when all was said and done, thanks to the Hawks shooting just 5-of-20 from the field in the third while Indiana went 12-of-16, with a 10-point advantage in the paint.

Paul George had a redemptive game, finishing with 27 points, 10 rebounds, six assists and four steals. The box score was less kind to Roy Hibbert, who was just 1-of-7 from the field with four rebounds in over 24 minutes. The matchups aren’t good for Hibbert in this series, and going smaller and quicker with guys like Ian Mahinmi (eight points) and Luis Scola (20 points in 19 minutes) seems to make more sense.

The Pacers played to their potential, while the Hawks seemed to give up without much of a fight in the third once Indiana exerted a bit of force. Atlanta needs to step up the intensity to have a chance in Game 3, while the Pacers simply need to share the ball offensively to generate open looks, and play the league’s best defense in order to reclaim home court advantage.

Hawks hire Travis Schlenk as general manager

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The Hawks picked Warriors assistant general manager Travis Schlenk as their next general manager. All that was left was negotiating terms.

That’s done.

Hawks:

The Atlanta Hawks today announced the hiring of Travis Schlenk as General Manager and Head of Basketball Operations. He will start leading Hawks basketball operations on June 1.

Schlenk worked his way up the latter and helped the Warriors become the envy of every other NBA team. He deserves this opportunity.

But the job won’t be easy.

The Hawks are stuck between two directions. On one side, they have veterans Paul Millsap (a 32-year-old pending unrestricted free agent whom the owner has basically promised a huge contract) and Dwight Howard (who sounds unhappy). On the other side, they have a youth movement featuring Dennis Schroder and Taurean Prince. Tim Hardaway Jr., who bridges the age groups, is about to enter a potentially tricky restricted free agency.

Keeping the core together offers the upside of a playoff-series victory or two annually, modest outcomes for the cost. But a fragile Atlanta fan base might not tolerate a rebuild.

Schlenk works for owner Tony Ressler, and Ressler sounds committed to maintaining the status quo by keeping Millsap. It’s now Schlenk’s job to execute that vision or convince his boss to approve a different direction.

Potential none-and-done first-rounder Hamidou Diallo returning to Kentucky

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The more I’ve looked into the 2017 NBA draft, the less impressed I’ve become. There are a few bright spots in the first round relative to an average draft – No. 2, 5ish-10ish, 17ish-22ish – but I’m not convinced this is the generationally strong draft it has been touted as.

In the absence of prospects who offer secure promise, why not turn to upside? Hamidou Diallo offered plenty and was increasingly viewed as a first-rounder.

Yet, he’ll return to Kentucky for his freshman season.

Diallo:

A highly ranked recruit, Diallo began last school year at a prep school then enrolled at Kentucky for the spring semester. He practiced with the Wildcats, but never played.

Then, he went to the combine and posted excellent measurables: 6-foot-5, 6-foot-11 wingspan, 44.5-inch vertical and strong agility and sprint scores. Just 18, Diallo might have been the second-youngest player drafted this year (behind only Ike Anigbogu).

It wouldn’t have taken long – likely somewhere in the middle of the first round – for a team to bite on all that potential.

Instead, Diallo returns to Kentucky and must now show his ability to actually produce in basketball games. If he does, there’s no limit on how high he goes in the 2018 NBA draft. If he doesn’t, he’ll regret missing the opportunity to get drafted before his game got picked apart.

Report: Bulls expect Dwyane Wade to opt in

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Dwyane Wade said he wants to see the Bulls’ plan for Jimmy Butler and the rest of the roster before deciding on a $23.8 million player option for next season.

K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune:

I can tell you is most everyone associated with the Bulls believes Wade will pick up the option and remain in Chicago for a second season. More surprising things have happened in league history, though. So stay tuned.

This could be a tell that Wade will opt in. The Bulls could obviously be positioned to base their prediction on inside information into Wade’s thinking.

This could a tell the Bulls won’t trade Butler. If they know they’ll keep Butler, they can extrapolate what that’d mean for Wade.

Or the Bulls, like so many of us, just assume a 35-year-old Wade won’t turn down so much guaranteed money at this stage of his career.

PBT Extra: Why Derrick Rose more likely to be Spur than Chris Paul next season

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San Antonio heads into this summer looking to answer the question: What do we need to do to challenge the Golden State Warriors? Well, besides keeping Kawhi Leonard healthy.

They need to get more athletic, particularly along the front line, and they need a secondary shot creator and playmaker, that’s all at the top of the list.

One rumor that keeps gaining traction, Chris Paul to the Spurs. In this PBT Extra, I get into why that move is unlikely, and why a one-year contract with Derrick Rose is more probable. Basically, if you want to see a significant roster shift in San Antonio, wait until the summer of 2018.