Grizzlies guard Nick Calathes suspended 20 games for violating NBA’s anti-drug policy

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UPDATE 4-19, 1:54 am: The NBA has confirmed the suspension, just as previously reported. The 20-game suspension begins on Saturday when the Grizzlies take on the Thunder in the first round of the playoffs.

The positive test was for Tamoxifen, which is on the banned substance list because it can be used as a masking agent for steroid use.

4-18 7:49 pm: On the eve of the NBA playoffs, things just got much more difficult for the Memphis Grizzlies.

This is an odd one, as a cursory search shows that Tamoxifen “treats advanced breast cancer in men and women, and early breast cancer in women. Also may prevent breast cancer in women who are at a high risk because of age, family history, or other factors.”

It appears to be geared toward women specifically, as this WebMD post would seem to indicate. But apparently, it can also be used to mask steroids.

From William Harris of How Stuff Works:

Many breast cancers have receptors for estrogen, a hormone that promotes the development and maintenance of female characteristics of the body. When estrogen molecules fit into these receptors, like a key fitting into a lock, the malignant cells become activated. Tamoxifen blocks these estrogen receptors, interfering with the cancer’s ability to grow and develop. This is why scientists refer to tamoxifen as an anti-estrogenic agent.

Now let’s turn our attention to a home-run slugger taking steroid injections — usually synthetic testosterone — to grow his muscles. Large doses of the male hormone cause the body to produce additional estrogen. This in turn can result in enlarged breasts, a feature that most power hitters find unappealing. To counteract the effects of estrogen and mask their steroid use, these players may opt to take tamoxifen. That means anti-estrogens don’t really enhance performance, but, because they alleviate symptoms of PEDs, they appear on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s list of more than 200 banned substances and methods.

Calathes is in his first year with Memphis, and though casual fans may have no idea who he is, his absence from the first round of the playoffs will hurt the Grizzlies chances.

Calathes has been getting legitimate time in the rotation backing up Mike Conley, averaging 16.5 minutes per game. With him now unavailable, Memphis will likely be forced into playing Knicks castoff Beno Udrih, and that’s a severe downgrade, especially defensively.

Wojnarowski reports that the NBA is expected to make the announcement official late Friday or sometime on Saturday. The Grizzlies open the playoffs in Oklahoma City against the Thunder at 9:30 p.m. ET on Saturday.

Dwyane Wade says Bulls’ showers had no hot water in Boston

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The Bulls suffered a rough loss in Boston last night.

It didn’t get better afterward.

K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune:

Celtics general manager Danny Ainge – who played for Boston in the 80s – pleaded ignorance to any nefarious plumbing:

I think the idea that teams plot to shut off the visitor’s hot water is often overstated. Arenas have complex infrastructure, and things can go wrong on their own. Sometimes, the home team loses hot water, but that never gets remembered.

But reasonable excuses don’t make a cold shower in the moment any more tolerable.

Robin Lopez pushes short floater over backboard (video)

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Robin Lopez had reason to be upset from the Bulls’ Game 5 loss to the Celtics last night.

This miss was all on him.

Dwyane Wade plays the laziest defense you’ll ever see (video)

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Dwyane Wade (26 points, 11 rebounds, eight assists) was the Bulls’ best player in their Game 5 loss to the Celtics last night.

But the 35-year-old guard clearly didn’t go all out on every possession.

Players can justify not closing out by claiming they were prioritizing rebounding position. Wade clearly has no such excuse.

Video Breakdown: Clippers use JJ Redick in split cut to fool Jazz at 3-point line

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The Los Angeles Clippers dropped Game 5 to the Utah Jazz on Tuesday night, and find themselves down 3-2 as they head back to Salt Lake City for Game 6. The Clippers have had to deal with Utah’s formidable defense, so much so that they’ve built in counters to Jazz defenders overplaying shooters like JJ Redick.

One example of this countering method could be found in Game 3, when the Clippers ran a split cut for Redick. Instead of fighting endlessly around screens for a 3-point shot as you might expect, LA took the easy route and simply cut Redick to the basket for an easy layup as a means to take advantage of an overeager defender.

We’ve talked about the Split Cut here on NBA Playbook before. The Los Angeles Lakers used it earlier in the season to beat the Golden State Warriors, the team that uses the split cut perhaps the most out of any team in the NBA.

Other teams, including the Portland Trail Blazers, have adapted the Warriors’ use of the split cut as a counter for their own offense this season, which is a testament to just how useful it is.

If you need a reminder, a split cut all about a screener coming up to screen, then cutting toward the basket before his screen action fully takes place. It’s about timing, and catching defenders off guard when they go to set up their recover positions for screens.

For a full breakdown on the split cut and how the Clippers used it, watch the video above.