Nets GM says re-signing Shaun Livingston this summer is ‘priority number one’

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Shaun Livingston has had one of his best seasons as a pro with Brooklyn this year, providing stability and athleticism at the guard position while starting in 43 of his 65 appearances.

Livingston will be a free agent this summer, and all signs point to him cashing in if he gets the chance. He’s been on essentially minimum salary deals since suffering the horrific knee injury early in his career, and making the most money possible in what may be his final chance to do so on a long-term deal would obviously make the most sense.

Nets GM Billy King spoke with reporters before Friday’s win over the Celtics, and said he has every intention of re-signing Livingston, but admitted that the finances might be a challenge.

From Stefan Bondy of the New York Daily News:

King also used his 10-minute session with the media Friday to applaud the job of Kidd and proclaim that re-signing impending free agent Shaun Livingston is “priority No. 1.”

Two days after Livingston hinted to the Daily News that he’s keen on signing a big contract – one the Nets can’t afford because they’re over the cap – King laid out his own options for Livingston.

“The market will set itself and then he’ll have to make a decision that’s best for him,” he said. “Do you take a million more to play and lose?”

That answer for Livingston will almost certainly be a resounding “yes.”

Livingston knows that his role with the Nets has played a part in the value he’s now earned, but he also is well aware that this might be his best chance to secure a multi-year deal for more than the Nets have to offer.

Brooklyn will likely have a mid-level exception to give to Livingston, which will be in the neighborhood of just over $3 million per year. But if he can get more elsewhere, or if he can gain the security of more years on his next contract, Livingston will likely (and wisely) sign for the most money possible.

Video Breakdown: Clippers use JJ Redick in split cut to fool Jazz at 3-point line

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The Los Angeles Clippers dropped Game 5 to the Utah Jazz on Tuesday night, and find themselves down 3-2 as they head back to Salt Lake City for Game 6. The Clippers have had to deal with Utah’s formidable defense, so much so that they’ve built in counters to Jazz defenders overplaying shooters like JJ Redick.

One example of this countering method could be found in Game 3, when the Clippers ran a split cut for Redick. Instead of fighting endlessly around screens for a 3-point shot as you might expect, LA took the easy route and simply cut Redick to the basket for an easy layup as a means to take advantage of an overeager defender.

We’ve talked about the Split Cut here on NBA Playbook before. The Los Angeles Lakers used it earlier in the season to beat the Golden State Warriors, the team that uses the split cut perhaps the most out of any team in the NBA.

Other teams, including the Portland Trail Blazers, have adapted the Warriors’ use of the split cut as a counter for their own offense this season, which is a testament to just how useful it is.

If you need a reminder, a split cut all about a screener coming up to screen, then cutting toward the basket before his screen action fully takes place. It’s about timing, and catching defenders off guard when they go to set up their recover positions for screens.

For a full breakdown on the split cut and how the Clippers used it, watch the video above.

John Wall wears cape to postgame press conference (video)

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John Wall has been super, averaging 27 points and 11 assists while leading the Wizards to a 3-2 lead over the Hawks in the first-round.

Did you see Isaiah Thomas carry in Game 5? ‘No,’ says Fred Hoiberg, who walks off (video)

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Fred Hoiberg opened himself to clowning by complaining about Isaiah Thomas carrying.

So, the Bulls coach got clowned after the Celtics’ Game 5 win.

Jae Crowder leg-locks Robin Lopez (video)

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Late in the Celtics’ Game 5 win over the Bulls last night, Jae Crowder leg-locked Robin Lopez – the same dirty play that caused rancor for Matthew Dellavedova in the 2015 playoffs.

Lopez blocked Crowder’s shot, but the ball went to Al Horford, who attacked the basket. As Lopez tried to rotate to contest another shot, he couldn’t move. Crowder, who’d fallen to the floor, had him in a leg-lock. Lopez freed himself just in time to foul Horford.

Adding insult to avoided injury, Lopez got hit with a technical foul for complaining about the no-call.

I bet the league issues a technical foul on Crowder, too.