Dwyane Wade-Udonis Haslem combo returns, but any dividends put in escrow

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BOSTON – Dwyane Wade had barely crossed halfcourt when Udonis Haslem streaked past him and all the way behind the defense. Wade tossed the ball toward the rim, and Haslem grabbed it and dunked, hanging on the rim an extra beat.

The Celtics called timeout, on their way to a 14-point deficit midway through the first half. Haslem would make his first six shots in the first quarter to go with four rebounds, two assists and two blocks in the period. Wade would lead the Heat in scoring.

The once the franchise’s most-dependable duo, Wade and Haslem were back in action, excelling together.

In three of the five seasons between 2005-06 and 2009-10, Wade and Haslem finished 1-2 on the Heat in win shares.* And in the other two years, Haslem came within a tenth of a win share of second place.**

*Shaquille O’Neal was definitely one of the Heat’s two best players in 2005-06, but he missed 23 games to Haslem’s one. As they say, the most important ability is availability.

**James Posey Haslem him 2006-07, and Chris Quinn edged him in 2007-08.

But besides 67 seconds two weeks ago – due only to a teammate’s foul trouble – Wade and Haslem hadn’t played together in Miami’s previous 27 games. Until tonight, Haslem’s first start since the Heat’s sixth game of the season.

“It was just like old times,” Wade said.

A bit too much, actually.

Of course, Haslem’s role has shrunk since Miami signed LeBron James and moved toward dynasty status. With LeBron out due to back spasms tonight, the Heat returned to their unsteady ways in a 101-96 loss to Boston.

This is Miami’s ninth loss to a team that currently has losing record, the most such losses among any of the NBA’s top 10 teams.

“That’s not good,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said with genuine-sounding concern. “That’s not good. We have to do better.”

Maybe tonight’s loss was an anomaly, though.

Not only was LeBron out with what seems like a relatively minor injury, Wade left the game with a nosebleed not caused by contact. He returned with a roll of cotton sticking out of his nostril and a noticeable uncomfortableness on the court.

“I didn’t feel right the whole time I was out there,” Wade said. “…I feel like a boxer. It wouldn’t stop.”

Wade led the Heat with 17 points. But unlike LeBron, who has averaged 37.0 points and scored at least 27 in the nine games Wade has missed since New Year’s, Wade hasn’t found his groove without LeBron.

Then again, does that really matter? If the Heat lose LeBron in the playoffs, they’re in deep trouble, anyway. And anything in between is becoming increasingly irrelevant.

The Heat still trail the Pacers, who lost to the Knicks tonight, by three games with 16 contests left for Miami and 14 for Indiana. It’s getting late to grab the No. 1 seed.

At this point in the season, the Heat should be focused on readying themselves for the playoffs – resting players like LeBron and dusting the cobwebs off players like Haslem.

Haslem played 27 minutes tonight – more than he’d played in Miami’s previous 20 games combined. He lost steam as the game progressed, finishing with 14 points and five rebounds, but this experience could serve him well if he’s called upon in the postseason. In the long run, it probably won’t matter the Heat lost tonight in Boston. It might matter whether Haslem found a rhythm he can carry into May and June.

“He’s been terrific. He’s been giving us incredible bottled-up energy and toughness. That’s what this group needs,” Spoelstra said. “We just didn’t do enough tonight to get the job done.”

That might just depend what the job is.

Watch Allen Iverson’s first bucket in Big3 League debut

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The Big3 League came to Brooklyn and put on a show (which you can see broadcast on FS 1 Monday night).

That includes coach Allen Iverson putting on a jersey and playing a little.

He got his first bucket taking a ball saved from going out of bounds, dribbling up to the elbow, and knocking it down. The crowd loved it. Iverson coached/played his team to victory thanks to Andre Owens putting up 20 points and 15 rebounds.

 

D’Angelo Russell makes first appearance at Barclays Center, gets booed

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Welcome to New York, D'Angelo Russell.

The Brooklyn Nets made a smart gamble before the draft and traded Brook Lopez (and his expiring contract) to the Lakers for the bloated contract of Timofey Mozgov and the promise of Russell. It’s a smart move to see if coach Kenny Atkinson can lift up the young point guard who shows promise but is inconsistent.

Nets fans don’t seem so thrilled. Russell showed up for the Big3 games at Barclays Center, and he did not feel the love, reports Tim Bontemps of the Washington Post.

These are New York fans, they would boo George Washington.

It’s simple for Russell, he just has to win them over. He gets a fresh start in Brooklyn and the baggage the Lakers saw him carrying is gone. It’s his chance to win a city over and be part of the future — but he will have to earn it.

Otherwise, it won’t be long or he will hear those boos again.

Spike Lee says not everyone at Nike thought Jordan should be face of company at first

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We have mythologized Michael Jordan into a man who could almost walk on water, and could certainly walk on air. He legitimately is the GOAT — or, at the very least, one of a handful of players ever worthy of being in that conversation — but the idea he is perfect is far from true.  (He was 6-7 in getting his team to the Finals, LeBron is 8-4, so LeBron lifted lesser teams farther, to use one devil’s advocate argument).

Not everyone always believed in Jordan, and that came out in a couple recent articles.

The Chicago Tribune ran a June 20, 1984, article about Jordan being drafted from their paper, where then GM Rod Thorn was not exactly selling Jordan as a franchise changing player.

“There just wasn’t a center available,” said Thorn. “What can you do?”

“He’s only 6-5,” said Thorn, who must use a different yardstick than Dean Smith, the Carolina coach. Down where the tobacco grows, Jordan has always been 6-6, not that one inch ever stopped Jordan from crashing the boards, hitting from the outside or playing substantially above sea level. By the time he gets to Chicago, or when negotiations for his wages get sticky, Jordan may be the size of a jockey. The Bulls aren’t even sure where to play Jordan. “Big guard, small forward,” said coach Kevin Loughery.

Jordan ended up being the perfect player at the perfect time — an all-time great who peaked just as the popularity of the game took off, and with a little help from Nike his image blew up.

Except, not everybody at Nike was down with Jordan being the face of the organization, Spike Lee told Sole Collector (remember Lee and his commercials helped blow up Jordan’s image).

“People don’t know about this, but the truth is a lot of people were speaking in Mr. Knight’s ear that it might not be too good for Nike to have Michael Jordan as the face of the company,” Lee revealed to Sole Collector. He added that there were worries that Jordan “might not appeal to white America, or the general market as a whole.”

Jordan, obviously, transcended the market and everything else.

But Jordan had his doubters and had his rough patches. He got his head handed to him year after year by the Bad Boy Pistons, who taught him how to win the hard way. He was thought of as the guy who couldn’t win the big one, who was too selfish a player to lead a team to a title.

In hindsight, it’s laughable. But that’s what you get when you try to define a person’s legacy before his career is over.

 

Jimmy Butler shows up in Minnesota wearing a fanny pack and holding a football (PHOTO)

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Jimmy Butler is now a member of the Minnesota Timberwolves, reunited with former Chicago Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau. A draft day trade between the Bulls and the Timberwolves saw Butler head to Minnesota in exchange for the No. 7 pick in 2017 NBA Draft, Zach LaVine, and Kris Dunn.

Butler and Thibodeau get along quite well, and there’s little doubt Butler will be one of the league leaders in minutes played for the Timberwolves next season. With the trade finalized, Butler showed up in Minnesota this week alongside Thibodeau wearing a very Butler-esque outfit.

There’s no good way to describe it other than by looking at it.

Via Twitter:

The Bulls got hosed.