Phil Jackson promises return of system basketball to New York, wants ‘Melo to be part of it

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You can’t win titles in the NBA without elite talent. Superstars matter. It is the nature of the sport.

However there is more to it than that, nobody ever just rolled the ball out and won a ring. Franchises have to put those stars in a system that benefits them but more importantly benefits the role players around them — true stars will thrive in any style, it is getting a system in place and the right role players for that system that elevates the stars and team to title contention.

Phil Jackson understands that better than anyone.

When Jackson talked basketball at the Tuesday press conference that introduced him as New York Knicks team president, he talked system. New York will always be able to attract stars, what they need is everything else. Jackson talked about balance — three guys going to the offensive glass, two guys back on defense to slow the break — and structure.

“I believe in system basketball,” Jackson said. “(Knicks GM) Steve Mills came out of Princeton. I came out of a system that we ran here in New York in which team basketball was an important aspect of playing. We believe that is what we want to accomplish here.”

They have a lot of work to do.

The Knicks are 27-40 this season and while they have made a little run of late (six straight wins) they remain five games back in the loss column to the Atlanta Hawks with 15 games to play. Even if they pull off the miracle and make the playoffs, it will not disguise the fact this is a bad basketball team right now. One largely locked into a similar roster next season with nine players under contract for $67 million — and that is without Carmelo Anthony, who has said he will opt out as a free agent. If the Knicks resign him that’s 10 players and they will be well into the luxury tax already.

Jackson said he wants to re-sign Anthony, saying that he is the best isolation scorer in the game but that Anthony can reach another level if he buys into the right system.

“Carmelo has had a load to carry this year, a scoring load, and he’s been remarkable in that,” Jackson said. “I think he showed in the last Olympics, coming off the bench and playing a role as a bench player on a magnificent team that won a gold medal, that he can play a role if he has to play a role. I think he’s a basketball player and I think that’s what players want to do — they want to cut, to pass, to be in a different spots on the floor, to attack and to play. And I think Carmelo will be just fine.”

To create that team where Anthony will be fine will require a lot of creativity. What Jackson talked about mostly was getting the right players for his system (which he said would at the least be triangle influenced).

“We’re going to have to go out and work the bushes for players the next year and we’re going to have to work them the coming years as we do go forward and we have draft picks, and we have the chance to build this team,” Jackson said.

The most probable rebuild scenarios come around in 2015 — the Knicks’ bad contracts come off the books (Amar’e Stoudemire, Tyson Chandler, Andrea Bargnani) freeing up money to spend plus they have their draft pick. That’s the year potential free agents include Kevin Love, Rajon Rondo and others. It’s not exactly a tabula rasa for Jackson to work with in 2015, but it’s far closer than this summer when the roster is clogged with contracts that, even if they can be moved, will not bring much value in return.

“Steve and I are going to work on how to manage the roster, and our financials, to have an impact in (2015 class),” Jackson said. “I think we need another contributor, someone that can score who can help Carmelo go along and contribute to this team and the winning experience.”

Jackson suggested most of the rebuilding will be done through free agency, which makes sense as the Knicks have traded away a lot of first round draft picks in the coming years.

How hands on Jackson will be with scouting remains to be seen, but don’t expect to see him in the bleachers of a lot of college games.

“I don’t know, to be honest with you,” Jackson said of his level of scouting involvement. “I think the first thing we have going on right now is the NCAA tournament and we will turn our focus on and watch. But I really want to turn our focus on NBA teams. The advent of the game, a lot of it is, that there are players that are on benches, that are on teams, that will be available, maybe not on high-priced contracts, that can come in and help assist and build a team. So there are a variety of ways in which we can build teams.”

Jackson is not the detail guy here — Mills will be the one dealing with agents, working directly with team scouts, figuring out the details of the salary cap. Jackson is going to be more of the CEO role, setting the tone and picking his people to execute it. On the court that will be a new coach (although Jackson said good things about Mike Woodson at the press conference, still everyone knows he is a dead coach walking) and it will mean new people in the Knicks front office over time.

Jackson suggested whatever system is in place will be triangle influenced, if not outright full triangle. That can certainly work. There is not one magical system that wins (or everyone would run it). Whether it is the Bulls and Lakers in the triangle, the evolving system of Gregg Popovich and the Spurs, or the space and pace of Miami, what matters is having elite talent, having a system in place to support that talent, and having the right players in the system around those stars to make it work.

Jackson understands system better than anyone.

Now we’ll see if he can build and execute it from the front office.

Bucks’ Jabari Parker “frustrated,” wants more playing time

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In the first two games against Boston, Jabari Parker is 1-of-7 shooting, has grabbed 15 percent of the available rebounds while on the court (low for a big expected to board), has more turnovers than assists, has been exploited on defense by Boston, and is -29. All in just 25 minutes.

Parker is also frustrated he isn’t getting more minutes and more of a chance to prove himself. From Stephen Watson of WISN News 12 in Milwaukee:

While there are questions about how Joe Prunty has handled the Bucks and their rotations in this series, more Jabari Parker is nobody’s answer. Except Parker’s. And Celtics’ fans. Parker can be as frustrated as he wants, he hasn’t played his way into more minutes.

Parker returned to the Bucks in January after rehab on his second ACL surgery and averaged 12.6 points per game. He showed some value, with an ability to score efficiently inside and shooting 38 percent from three, averaging 12.6 points per game. But he remains a below-the-rim player who struggles to defend, and in the playoffs that gets a guy a seat.

It’s going to be an interesting summer. Parker is a restricted free agent this summer and the Bucks do not see him as a core part of their future next to Giannis Antetokounmpo anymore, they are not going to come in with a big offer to keep him. However, his play (especially in the postseason) and injury history, combined with a tight free agent market, means he may not have many suitors at all. Is it possible a rebuilding team willing to take a chance — Phoenix, Atlanta, etc. — would come in with an offer higher than the Bucks would match? Yes, it’s possible. But it won’t be for a lot of years, just one or two as teams want to see if he can get right and become the player he once projected to be.

Sixers’ Joel Embiid upgraded to “probable,” will start in Game 3 Thursday

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Everything you saw in the first two games of this Miami/Philadelphia playoff series you can throw out in the trash.

Joel Embiid is back and is now “probable” for Game 3, the Sixers announced, upgrading his status from “doubtful” earlier in the day. Embiid had been out with a concussion and orbital bone fracture.

Embiid will go through warmups — trying out both a mask and goggles — then will make a formal decision. However, he is expected to go. He certainly wants to play. And he is expected to start. How many minutes he can go remains to be seen.

This changes the Sixers and the series. Yes, Philly has likely Rookie of the Year Ben Simmons and high quality role players such as J.J. Redick and Robert Covington, however, is Embiid that makes it all work. Put simply, when Embiid is on the court the Sixers are 15.2 points per 100 possessions better — their defense is elite and their offense is outstanding.

The Sixers will be better with their best player back in the fold, but don’t think this makes the series a cakewalk for Philly. It changes everything about matchups, but things are not all positives. When Embiid is on the court, the up-tempo, ball-movement style that the Sixers built around Simmons slows down and stops at points. The Sixers have played Hassan Whiteside and his rim protection off the court with floor spacing shooting bigs, now he has a place to be in the matchups. There are things the Heat can do now that may work for them.

It just may not matter — Philadelphia just got a lot better.

PBT Podcast: NBA first round playoff series breakdowns

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LeBron James‘ Cavaliers looks to be in a battle royal in the first round — and they could lose to Victor Oladipo‘s Pacers.

Miami’s defense and versatility is challenging the Sixers and shaking the faith of all those that just jumped on the bandwagon.

Utah stole a game in Oklahoma City showing great grit and resolve, not to mention a lot of Donovan Mitchell.

Anthony Davis has done everything but walk on water for the Pelicans.

The first round of the NBA playoffs has been filled with fascinating storylines — and we are just two games into each series. Kurt Helin and Dan Feldman of NBC Sports break down all eight first-round series in this podcast, starting in the East and the tight races there, then move into the West. There’s even some “who wants to pay Jabari Parker this summer?” talk thrown in.

As always, you can check out the podcast below, listen and subscribe via iTunes at ApplePodcasts.com/PBTonNBC, subscribe via the fantastic Stitcher app, check us out on Google play, or check out the NBC Sports Podcast homepage and archive at Art19.

James Dolan says Knicks must build around ‘great’ Kristaps Porzingis, offers fair rebuke of meddling charges

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Phil Jackson received a standing ovation in his first game at Madison Square Garden as Knicks president. Don’t forget how excited New York was for Jackson, who coached the Bulls and Lakers to 11 championships and played for the Knicks’ last title team. He was welcomed as a potential savior.

The common refrain: Jackson would have a chance to succeed if Knicks owner James Dolan didn’t meddle.

Immediately, Dolan said he would cede control to Jackson “willingly and gratefully.” Dolan later pledged to honor Jackson’s full five-year contract.

But fans turned on Jackson as he did an awful job and the Knicks struggled. Dolan opted into the final two years of Jackson’s contract, anyway, as he said he would all along. Fans got angrier. When Jackson publicly flaunted Kristaps Porzingis trade talks, outrage reached a fever pitch. Finally, Dolan stepped in to fire Jackson.

Dolan, via Larry Brooks of the New York Post:

“A great player in hockey is the difference, but a great player in basketball is the team.

“And I think we have a great player in Porzingis. We just have to build around him.”

“Everybody who wants to talk about the Knicks wants to ask me about Phil Jackson,” Dolan said, smiling and shaking his head. “The entire market wanted to me to hire him and when I did, the entire market said it was a great move. The only thing was, everyone said that I shouldn’t interfere with him.

“Three years later, everyone wanted to know when I was going to do something about Phil. The same people who told me not to interfere wanted me to interfere. But that’s OK. I just think that Phil underestimated the job.”

Dolan makes a salient point about how people perceive his involvement. The problem isn’t that Dolan meddles. It’s that he makes poor decisions.

Hiring Jackson – an out-of-touch former coach with no front-office experience – was a poor decision. I’m not enthused about Steve Mills as Jackson’s replacement, either, though we’ll see how that plays out.

Building around Porzingis is a better decision. He’s an extremely talented 22-year-old.

But it’s hardly a foolproof plan. Porzingis is recovering from a torn ACL. Dolan said Porzingis could return in December – or miss next season entirely.

Either way, the Knicks must surround Porzingis with better teammates. Dolan will and should be a part of that process. Whether he’ll positively affect it is another matter.