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Kevin McHale thinks NBA should raise age limit

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One of new commissioner Adam Silver’s goals is get the NBA’s age limit raised to 20. He works for the owners and that is something they wanted out of the new collective bargaining agreement but put the issue aside in favor of getting a last minute deal done.

Silver has a new ally on this front — Hall of Famer Kevin McHale.

The legendary Celtics player and current coach of the Houston Rockets told Sam Amick of the USA Today he wants to see the minimum age limit in the NBA raised, that he can’t stand the one-and-done rule.

“I’m totally against (one and done),” McHale said. “I understand (the argument) that it’s America and everybody has a right to work. I understand that. But the guys aren’t ready. (When) you’re 16 years old or 15 years old, they don’t put you into doggone smelting or anything. Man, the NBA is a man’s league, and I think a lot of these young guys come in early and their careers would prosper if they stayed (in college).

“I’d like to see us do the three years out of high school or 21 (years old), like football. I just think it would help the colleges. I think it would help the kids. And I know they don’t think so, because they want to say, ‘Hey, I’ve got to get in the market. I’ve got to make all my money and all that stuff.’ But you don’t make money if you have a three-year career, if you come in at 18, 19, and you’re not ready.”

What McHale wants as a coach, what the owners want, is someone else to develop the best players and not on their dime. You know colleges would love to keep the stars around longer because they are businesses as well and it would help their marketing. For the NBA somebody else pays and does the work of developing the skills, they get a more polished player and one who already likely has built up more name recognition and marketing brand (again done not on the team’s dime).

What’s more, the coaches likely have to do less babysitting. Some players who came straight out of high school to the NBA didn’t have basic life skills — their parents took them to all their games/practices on time, fed them, washed their clothes. Those are the kind of things a lot of college students had to learn to do for themselves for the first time (get to class, budget their time to study, get clean clothes, etc.) and it forced myself and a lot of us to grow up. NBA teams don’t want to baby players through these basic life lessons, in theory players would already come out of college able to get to practices on time and generally be more professional.

That makes sense from the owners’ perspective, but because it’s good for them doesn’t make it good for the worker, the player. What would LeBron James or Kobe Bryant really have gained from college — they got to work on their game more hours (no NCAA limits) and against higher levels of competition going straight to the NBA. Players will develop their skills faster in the NBA (teams just don’t want to deal with it if someone else will do it for free). You know the NBA isn’t changing the rookie pay scale, so if the best guys enter the league at 21 they will be 24-25 before they get the big contracts — why is it fair for the NBA to reduce the number of years those players will be able to make money as a professional? Because that is what an age limit does, it takes a year or two years or however many years of earnings away from the guys who are capable. If you’re Mark Zuckerberg should you have to stay in college and wait to grow Facebook? Why should the best players be punished because other guys aren’t ready for the jump?

It’s not a simple issue. Ultimately Silver will likely get what he wants, he’s just going to have to negotiate with the players’ union and give the players something they want to make it happen. It’s a negotiation (one that can’t start until the players union hires a new executive director).

WATCH: LeBron James, Stephen Curry lead NBA’s top 100 plays of 2015-16 season

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The NBA has unveiled its top 100 plays of the 2015-16 season, and there’s no mystery as to what were the top two.

No. 2: Stephen Curry‘s halfcourt buzzer-beater in overtime against the Thunder in Oklahoma City during the season.

No. 1: “The Block” by LeBron James on Andre Iguodala in the final stretch of Game 7 of the Finals.

There’s plenty more, too, and if you have 25 minutes to kill, you can and should watch all of them above.

Report: Celtics re-sign Tyler Zeller for two years, $16 million

ATLANTA, GA - APRIL 19:  Kyle Korver #26 of the Atlanta Hawks grabs a rebound against Tyler Zeller #44 of the Boston Celtics in Game Two of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Philips Arena on April 19, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia.  NOTE TO USER User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
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Tyler Zeller is one of the few restricted free agents left on the market who could make an actual impact next season, and on Saturday morning, he’s come off the board. Steve Bulpett of the Boston Herald reports that the fourth-year big man has agreed to a deal to stay with the Celtics. It’s for two years and $16 million, with the second season being a team option.

Zeller isn’t a starter, but he’s a nice rotation big man, especially at that price. He can play minutes off the bench for Boston, and his contract is also very movable with the second season being unguaranteed. He played just 11.8 minutes per game last season, but averaged 18.5 points and 9 rebounds per 36 minutes.

Watch Charles Barkley struggle to pronounce “Jonas Valanciunas” last season

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The Toronto Raptors were good last season, second best team in the East. That means the guys on Inside the NBA on TNT had to talk about them.

Which means Charles Barkley had to say “Jonas Valanciunas” a lot. Which is high comedy. While a lot of people struggle to say his name the guy is a solid NBA center who, with a little practice, you can say (and spell) his name pretty easily.

This comes from a YouTube user, via Reddit, with a hat tip to Eye on Basketball.

Watch highlights of USA’s 111-74 rout of Argentina in exhibition game

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Argentina isn’t considered a medal contender heading into the Rio Olympics. Their golden generation — led by Manu Ginobili — has picked up a lot of speed on the downhill side of their careers at this point.

They didn’t provide much of a challenge for Team USA in an exhibition game Friday night in Las Vegas, one won by the USA 111-74. Kevin Durant impressed playing with his new teammates in dropping 23 points, Paul George had 18, and the Americans had their way in the game.

Which is what we’re going to see a lot of in Rio — the USA’s talent level is just steps above any other team in the tournament.