The Extra Pass: Should Indiana be worried about its offense? And Tuesday’s recaps.

6 Comments

source:

LOS ANGELES — Indiana is the best team in the NBA right now — they have the best record in the league (by percentage points over Oklahoma City) and they have the best point differential in the league. The Pacers are legitimate title contenders.

They have done all that in spite of their offense.

The Pacers are scoring 102.8 points per 100 possessions this season, which is 18th best in the NBA. That pedestrian number is masked by their top ranked defense, and with that they still have the best point differential in the league per possession. While there have been stretches where the offense has been above average, it has at no point been elite.

Is that something to worry about?

“Yea, a little bit, we want to be in the Top 10,” Pacers coach Frank Vogel said before his team took on the Lakers Tuesday night — and struggled for a half on offense against one of the league’s worst defenses. “With where our defense is, we feel if we are in the top 10 we are where we want to be. It’s probably not as high as we want to be.”

“We’ve got to get back to being consistent on the offensive end, sharing the ball, moving it, setting guys up, getting guys open and continuing to play for one another,” Paul George said.

Tuesday night the Pacers looked like a team with tired legs at the end of a road trip —George was 4-of-21 and didn’t have the lift we are accustomed to. Danny Granger was 3-of-10 shooting. As a team the Pacers were 2-of-11 from three in the first half.

Once again, as it has been for much of the season, it was left to Lance Stephenson to create offense, particularly on the perimeter in the half court. He responded, as he has much of the season — but Vogel admitted this was not the vision he had starting the season.

“I wanted to expand his role,” Vogel said of his plans for Stephenson going into training camp. “What I envisioned was getting him out early, bringing him back to play with the bench unit and running offense through him. That sort of expanded when he started producing with the starting unit. So obviously, we’re a balanced team and we’re going to go to the hot hand so to speak, or to whoever is making the most efficient plays. With the second unit that’s who we’re going with, but a lot of times with the first unit he’s been great too.”

The second unit is becoming a little more about Granger, who is in a sixth man role that he willingly has accepted. But Granger is not yet his old self.

“He’s coming, he’s coming,” Vogel said of Granger. “He’s not there yet, he knows that. There’s going to be good nights and not so good nights, good plays and not so good plays. When you come back from a major knee surgery like that you’re not really yourself until the second year. He’s only 18 or 19 games. But he’s got four months to play before we start the playoffs, and that’s where we think he will be the biggest factor for us.”

Against the Lakers — who want to run but don’t really bother to play transition defense — the Pacers got 17.4 percent of their attempts in transition. That’s part of the plan, Vogel said, describing what he wants the Pacers to play with is “intelligent tempo.”

“We want to explore for early strikes every time we get the ball, we don’t want to do it at the cost of turnovers, low turnovers, and (we want) great shots — not good shots, or average shots, or bad shots. Great shots and low turnovers,” Vogel said.

Come the playoffs, there will be less of that — which is fine by Indiana. The game slows down in the playoffs and that means the Pacers can get back and set their fierce defense.

But they are still going to have to score in the half court, and do it a bit more efficiently than they have to this point. At least they’ll need to against Miami and it’s aggressive defense (the rest of the East, it won’t matter). The Pacers have time to get back to what Paul George seems to remember them doing better.

Their offense isn’t really something to worry about, but a little concern is not out of order.

—Kurt Helin
source:

source:  Pelicans 100, Cavaliers 89: Anthony Davis put up a monster stat line of 30 points, seven rebounds and eight blocked shots for the Pelicans, who had little trouble with a Cavs team playing without Anderson Varejao due to injury. On the Cavs’ side, Kyrie Irving was average and Dion Waiters was slightly above, but the bright spot was rookie and number one overall draft pick Anthony Bennett, who cracked double figures scoring for the first time with 15 points and eight rebounds in 31 minutes of action. — Brett Pollakoff

Knicks 114, Celtics 88: The Knicks got their third straight victory, and got a small measure of revenge in the process. Boston handed New York two of their worst losses of the season, but this time the result was never in doubt for the Knicks. New York led by as many as 35 points in this one before the game came to its merciful conclusion. Kenyon Martin returned to action, but left with another injury that appeared to be related to his chronic ankle issues. Iman Shumpert also left in the first quarter with a shoulder injury and did not return, and his status moving forward remains unknown. It was an easy win for the Knicks, but a potentially costly one. –BP

Rockets 97, Spurs 90: Each team was missing one of its key players, but the game remained largely competitive nonetheless. The Spurs were without Kawhi Leonard due to a foot fracture, and the Rockets were without James Harden due to a bruised left thumb. San Antonio squandered a 15-point first half lead, and Houston rallied with a 33-18 third quarter that put them in command. Jeremy Lin hit some clutch shots late to seal it, and Dwight Howard finished with 23 points and 16 rebounds, but shot just 5-of-15 from the field. Howard shot a ridiculous 25 free throws, making 13 as part of San Antonio’s strategy to intentionally put him on the line. As punishment from the gods for employing this soul-crushing strategy, Boris Diaw led the Spurs with 22 points. Houston is now 3-0 against San Antonio on the season, the first time since 1997 where they’ll win the season series. — BP

Pistons 103, Magic 87: Detroit snapped a four-game losing streak thanks to a big performance from Andre Drummond, who finished with 13 points, 17 rebounds and a couple of blocked shots. The Pistons had a 22-point advantage in the paint, and Orlando rookie Victor Oladipo finished with a team-high 19 points off the bench in the losing effort. — BP

Grizzlies 98, Trail Blazers 81: Memphis plays good defense and that was able to turn ever Trail Blazer not named LaMarcus Aldridge (27 points) into a poor shooter — Blazers besides Aldridge shot 29.7 percent. On the other side, Portland is not a strong defensive team and the Grizzlies took advantage racing out 10-0 to open the game, going on to put up 61 first half points on 56.5 percent shooting and hit 4-of-8 threes, Mike Conley had 16 of his 19 in the first half, Zach Randolph had 23 on the night (but needed 22 shots). Damian Lillard was 2-of-9 from three leading a 4-of-24 shooting from beyond the arc night for Portland, and they need those buckets to fall for their offense to click. — Kurt Helin

 Wizards 88, Warriors 85: It felt like this game was played with those just-a-little-to-small carnival basketball rims — the winning Wizards shot 37.8 percent, the losing Warriors 37.5 percent. Stephen Curry had 23 points but needed 23 shots to get there, while Klay Thompson was 5-of-17 and David Lee was 2-of-10. Bradley Beal had 20 points, John Wall was just 6-of-19 shooting but he hit a three with 1:28 left that proved to be the game winner. –KH

 Pacers 104, Lakers 92: Indiana looked like a team on the end of a 10-day trip — they had no legs and it showed with Paul George shooting 4-of-21 and Roy Hibbert was 5-of-11 shooting. That’s why this was a tied game at the half. But the Pacers win with defense — they held the Lakers to 39.4 percent shooting — and by limiting their own mistakes, such as only giving up 4 turnovers all game. Those things and a deeper bench had the Pacers pulling away to win in the second half. Lance Stephenson led the way with 16 points on 6-of-9 shooting, plus he had 14 rebounds. Pau Gasol kept his run of strong play going with 21 points and 13 rebounds. –KH

Memphis Grizzlies sign former Oregon forward Dillon Brooks

Associated Press
Leave a comment

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — The Memphis Grizzlies have signed former Oregon forward Dillon Brooks, a second-round pick in last month’s NBA draft.

Terms of the deal weren’t disclosed.

Brooks was selected by the Houston Rockets with the 45th overall pick. The Grizzlies acquired him in exchange for a future second-round pick.

Brooks, 21, averaged 16.1 points, 3.2 rebounds and 2.7 assists as a junior at Oregon last season. He was named the Pac-12 player of the year and helped Oregon earn its first Final Four berth since 1939.

 

Looks like Kevin Love is subtweeting Kyrie Irving

1 Comment

Peculiar is not a word that comes up often in NBA talk. Not sure it comes up much of anywhere unless a Four Non-Blondes song is on the ’90s station, but especially in NBA talk it doesn’t come up. Until this week. First, there was this cryptic comment from Kyrie Irving earlier in the week about the state of the Cavaliers.

“Like I said, we’re in a peculiar place. The best thing we can do is handle things with class and professionalism.”

Friday it leaked that Kyrie Irving has asked to be traded from the Cavs. Which led to Kevin Love using the word “peculiar” in a tweet.

If you’re unfamiliar, “kick some rocks” is an impolite way of telling someone to leave, or take a walk (kicking rocks on the dirt road).

Fun times in Cleveland. Kobe Altman must be having a fun week in his new job.

Report: Knicks interested in Kyrie Irving trade, but Kristaps Porzingis is off the table

5 Comments

Kyrie Irving wants out of LeBron James‘ shadow and has asked for a trade in what seems a preemptive “if he’s going to leave then I’m going to leave first” kind of move.

Irving also gave the Cavaliers a list of preferred destinations. Which is nice. Irving doesn’t have a no-trade clause, he has no real power in these negotiations because he has two years on his deal — it is basically a child’s Christmas list to Santa starting with “a Dragon-themed Luxury Playhouse.”

The Knicks are on Irving’s preferred list, and they are interested but know the team’s best player is off the table, reports Ian Begley of ESPN.

The Knicks, obviously, have strong interest in Kyrie Irving (just like 29 other teams) but I’m told people in the Knicks front office would not be willing at this point to include Kristaps Porzingis in a trade. Some with the organization would be willing to include future first-round picks and Carmelo Anthony in a deal for Irving, per league sources.

A few thoughts here. At the top of the list, this is the absolutely right and only call for the Knicks, no way KP is available. And on social media, Porzingis liked a fan’s tweet of Irving in a Knicks’ uniform, so we know what he is thinking.

We know Carmelo would want to go to Cleveland, the question is would the Cavaliers want him with Irving gone? If they feel LeBron is leaving next summer, would this help change that dynamic and help get the Cavaliers back to the Finals?

If I were in the Knicks front office, I’d pitch the Anthony idea (heck, I’d pitch a Joakim Noah trade too, just to lighten up the room with a laugh). Then we could talk about doing a trade without Anthony or Porzingis, which would mean picks, Courtney Lee, Willy Hernangomez, Frank Ntilikina, and another player to make the numbers work.

The Cavaliers can afford to be patient, and they aren’t beholden to Irving’s list. See if teams with young assets — Phoenix, Dallas, Denver, etc. — come up with better offers. Wait the market out, don’t rush. If no deal blows you away, move into the season with Irving.

The Knicks are as realistic an option as anything right now. The doors are wide open.

Report: Cavaliers to officially make Koby Altman GM

photo via YouTube
2 Comments

“Congratulations, Koby. Here’s your new corner office with a view, meet your new executive assistant, and finally here are the keys to the Cavaliers franchise… oh, and by the way, Kyrie Irving wants to be traded. And LeBron James is a free agent next year. Good luck with all that, we’ll leave you to it.”

Since Cleveland Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert inexplicably let go of David Griffin as the team’s general manager, assistant GM Kobe Altman has stepped into the lead role for the franchise. Now Gilbert is going to remove the interim tag from Altman’s title, according to multiple reports. Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN was first.

Now that he has the job, all he has to do is find a new home for Irving, who has demanded a trade… or he doesn’t have to. Irving may be traded this summer, but he has two years left on his deal so Altman could just bring him back with LeBron and Kevin Love and make another run at it. Or he could sit back and listen to trade offers from a lot of teams, and if he sees one he likes pounce — Irving (unlike Carmelo Anthony) doesn’t have a no-trade clause, so he can go anywhere. Altman has leverage.

Altman respected around the league, but he took over a team up against the cap and tax, a team that needed to find a way to get more athletic to compete with the Warriors. Instead, the Cavs re-signed Kyle Korver (age 35), signed Jose Calderon (age 36), and re-signed Richard Jefferson (age 37). The Cavs have essentially treaded water this offseason, while Warriors, Celtics, and Rockets all got better. That’s not all on Altman, he was thrown into the job and with the team well into the tax his options were limited. He was handed a near impossible task.

Now Altman gets to own that task. Enjoy.