Andre Drummond

Andre Drummond benched twice in loss to Dallas Mavericks, doesn’t want to talk about it


How much can an NBA player really screw up in the first 11 seconds of a half?

In Andre Drummond’s case, enough to cause Detroit Pistons coach Maurice Cheeks to bench him.

On the Pistons first play of the second half in a loss to the Dallas Mavericks on Sunday, Drummond set a ball screen at the top of the key for Brandon Jennings. Drummond either rolled too soon or slipped it too late, so Monta Ellis had no trouble sticking with Jennings and Samuel Dalembert eased back onto Drummond. Jennings drove right, and Drummond, already in the restricted area, drifted outside the paint along the baseline. Dalembert stayed near the basket and contested what appeared to be a Jennings layup attempt, but it’s not conclusive, because Jennings fumbled the ball out of bounds on the way up.

What is conclusive is how the Pistons reacted.

Jennings held out his arms, palms up. Greg Monroe did the same. Kentavious Caldwell-Pope pointed to a spot near the initial screen and held his arms wide, pumping his elbows to express frustration.

Then, Jennings interlocked his fingers, put his hands on his head and made this face:


Cheeks pulled Drummond, and the Pistons were on their way toward their fourth straight loss and and 13th in their last 17 games.

Drummond re-entered a few minutes later, this time lasting three minutes before Cheeks pulled him again. On the possession prior, Drummond failed to secure an entry pass, but with such a large sample – three whole minutes! – Cheeks could have been dissatisfied with any number of things.

Sending a message is not necessarily unwarranted. Drummond, just 20, is still learning learning how to compete in the NBA.

But there’s no indication Cheeks’ message landed.

After the second benching, Drummond looked flustered on the bench. Detroit assistant coach Henry Bibby tried to talk to him, but Drummond just brushed him away.

Drummond got another chance in the fourth quarter. His total contributions in that period: seven minutes, one travel.

After the game, Drummond wasn’t in the mood to talk about what happened.

Cheeks addressed it, though. Via David Mayo of MLive:

“It was about his play, just about his play,” Cheeks said of the quick hook. “He went right back in. It’s a learning experience to do what we’re trying to do out of a timeout (actually halftime), and I don’t think he did it right. We took him out, we put him right back in.”
“He just had a bad game,” Cheeks said. “The guy’s 20 years old. We’re not going to expect him to be like a machine every night, to go get 18, 19 rebounds. He’s 20 years old. He didn’t have a good game.”

It’s not clear whether Drummond was upset with his own effort (an underwhelming four points and six rebounds for the game) or upset with Cheeks. At some point, the emotion will wear off, and Drummond will address the issue.

But for now, two things are clear for the Pistons.

1. Drummond must play better than he did Sunday. Whether his lack of production was his own fault, a strategic issue or a combination of both, Detroit needs more from Drummond.

2. A head coaching who has directed one of the NBA’s most disappointing teams can’t afford to clash with his best player.

C.J. McCollum ejected for flagrantly fouling Gordon Hayward (video)

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I’m not sure C.J. McCollum meant to grab Gordon Hayward‘s neck. The 6-foot-8 Hayward elevated, and the 6-foot-4 McCollum just might not have been able to get high enough to make a play on the ball.

But McCollum did grab Hayward’s neck.

It was a dangerous and unnecessary play, especially in the preseason.

Report: Mavericks may be team interested in Larry Sanders

Larry Sanders
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The Dallas Mavericks are looking for a center— desperately at times, they brought JaVale McGee into training camp to get a look. They will start Zaza Pachulia and behind him it’s probably Samuel Dalembert once he gets healthy.

Which is why Dallas may be the team interested in Larry Sanders — Mark Cuban is a guy known for giving second chances in the league. But there have been no talks, yet, reports Tim MacMahon at ESPN.

Larry Sanders has been out of the game since his buyout last February trying to deal with his personal demons and may well not be ready to return. He may never return.

His couple seasons with the Bucks were filled with drama and issues. There was the nightclub brawl left him with an injured thumb in need of a surgery. There were the charges of animal cruelty. There was a five-game drug suspension. There was missed time for personal reasons. There was the 10-game suspension for marijuana use (he failed at least four tests to get there) — then that suspension was extended past the 10 games. In the end, he agreed to a buyout to get space away from the game to deal with his personal issues.

He may or may not be ready to return from that. He may or may not ever be ready. But if he decides to give it a try, NBA teams will be waiting. Maybe Dallas.