Josh Smith, Shawne Williams, Nick Young

Josh Smith gets firmer (and bigger) role at the expense of Andre Drummond and Greg Monroe


Josh Smith, Greg Monroe and Andre Drummond will remain the Detroit Pistons’ starting frontcourt.

But those three, as the numbers have indicated would work best, have their seen their minutes staggered recently.

That will continue, said Pistons coach Maurice Cheeks.

“We’ll probably have Josh Smith and any one of the bigs on the floor,” Cheeks said in a video posted by David Mayo of MLive. “It will safe to say we’ll have those guys on the floor more, as opposed to Greg and Andre.”

So, lots of Smith-Drummond and Smith-Monroe and very little Monroe-Drummond.

All three combinations have actually yielded positive net ratings as long as the third player has been on the bench. That’s pretty significant on a team with a 16-22 record and a point difference that reflects an even worse record.

Sure, the Monroe-Drummond pairing has been the least-fruitful of the three, but eliminating it almost certainly means reducing the minutes of Monroe and Drummond.

Cheeks’ new strategy has really begun to take hold in the last four games. Monroe and Drummond have played together with out another big just one minute in that span.

The starting Smith-Monroe-Drummond lineup has wisely been used less than earlier in the season, but it’s still received an average of 15 minutes in the last four games.

Let’s say Smith keeps his per-game average of 35 minutes per game (though that’s ticked up to 38 in these last four games). If the recent trend holds, 15 of those will come with Monroe and Drummond. Let’s say the other 20 are split equally with Monroe and Drummond (though some could come with neither), Smith-Monroe and Smith-Drummond each getting 10 minutes per game.

That leaves 13 minutes for Monroe and Drummond to split – not share, because Cheeks said he wants to avoid that pairing (unless Smith is on the court too, which makes it significantly less effective).

Take it all together, and in this plan, Monroe and Drummond are each averaging 31.5 minutes per game. Of course, one of the two could get more minutes, but they’d come at the expense of the other.

Though that’s just over a one-minute drop in their season per-game averages, the symbolism is more telling.

The Pistons are becoming Josh Smith’s team.

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Smith struggled at small forward, but the Pistons won’t pull him – or Monroe, a pending free agent, or Drummond, a prospective All-Star – from the starting lineup. So, they’re left trying to get Smith as many minutes as possible at power forward in other ways. And because Cheeks doesn’t believe in using Monroe and Drummond together with a tradition 1-2-3 behind them – following the misguided lead of his predecessor, Lawrence Frank – that means fewer minutes for Monroe and Drummond, two of the NBA’s top young bigs.

With the absence of a third big to clog paint, Smith-Drummond and Smith-Monroe are probably better combinations than Monroe-Drummond right now. But Monroe-Drummond could be the Pistons’ future, considering they’re five and eight years younger than Smith. And in the present, the combination trumps most of what Detroit has done this season.

But, for the time being, Monroe and Drummond will just have to fit best they can once Smith is comfortably situated.

Somebody looks comfortable: Paul George drops 20 in first quarter

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Paul George‘s first experience starting as a power forward was going up against Anthony Davis — not just one of the best power forwards in the game, one of the handful of best players in the game period. That didn’t go well for George, and he wasn’t happy about it.

His second experience was in another preseason game Tuesday, going up against the Pistons and their four, Ersan İlyasova. He’s not quite as intimidating.

George scored 20 points on 7-of-8 shooting, 4-of-5 on threes — and that was just the first quarter (you can see it all in the video above).

As we have said before, George at the four is not a bad call by the Pacers, but some of that depends on the matchup. On the nights the Pacers face Davis or Blake Griffin or LaMarcus Aldridge or Zach Randolph (or a handful of others) the Pacers’ coaching staff is going to have to adjust. But there are a lot of nights where George at the four is going to force the other team to adjust, and that will play into the Pacers’ hands.

Is DeMarcus Cousins MVP worthy? “It’s mine to grab”

DeMarcus Cousins

Last season, DeMarcus Cousins received zero MVP votes (the same as every year of his career). Even though he averaged 24.1 points, and 12.7 rebounds a game, which was enough to get him his first All-Star berth, MVP is another thing entirely. Only players on winning teams tend to draw the attention of MVP voters.

This season, can Cousins — arguably the best center in the game — get in the conversation?

He thinks it’s more than just that, he told Kevin Ding at Bleacher Report.

The topic is the 2015-16 NBA MVP award and whether it could be reachable for DeMarcus Cousins.

“Reachable, man?” Cousins told Bleacher Report, his voice rising high. “It’s mine to grab.”

As noted above, the only way Cousins gets into the conversation — fair or not — is if the Kings are in the playoffs (at the very least). He understands that.

“It’s going to take a full team effort,” Cousins said. “I’ll try to play at a high level and bring my team along with me.”

Vlade Divac built a Kings’ team designed to start winning now — as you would expect from a team a year away from moving into a new arena they need to fill. Owner Vivek Ranadive is not about selling hope anymore, he wants to sell wins.

I think Cousins can help provide that.

I’m less sold on the cast around him being able to help.