J.R. Smith

The Extra Pass: J.R. Smith’s ‘joke gone wrong’ has him questioning his Knicks future

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NEW YORK — J.R Smith hasn’t played well enough this season to deserve either the minutes he’s been given, or the simple benefit of the doubt. And on Thursday night before a nationally televised game against the defending champion Miami Heat, Knicks head coach Mike Woodson finally did something about it.

Speaking to reporters more than 90 minutes before tip-off, Woodson shut down any talk of Smith, or his silly shoe-untying antics that went on for two straight games before the league office intervened with a $50,000 fine. As the questions came, Woodson refused to allow Smith to continue to become a focal point, and repeatedly deflected the queries as quickly as possible.

Then, the real magic happened.

When it was time for substitutions to occur in the first quarter, Smith didn’t get up and head to the scorer’s table. Tim Hardaway Jr. and Toure Murry were the first two in off the bench, and Smith sat at the end of it, both literally and figuratively, while choosing not to engage in his team’s sideline huddles.

Woodson had done it: Smith had been benched for this game, and possibly more. He received the dreaded DNP-CD, on a night his teammates more than picked up the slack in getting a 10-point victory over the Heat that was New York’s fourth in its last five games.

The one loss came by two points in Houston, on a night where Smith launched an ill-advised three-pointer late that potentially cost his team the win. His numbers are down substantially from those of last season, and that, along with the nonsense that has little to do with basketball warranted an internal, informal suspension lasting at least 48 minutes.

While Woodson wouldn’t comment at all about his player’s status, Smith was the first one available to media when the Knicks locker room opened post-game. And as it turned out, he had no idea he wouldn’t play on Thursday, and said he was uncertain about his future with the Knicks franchise.

“There hasn’t been any,” Smith said, when asked whether or not he had a discussion with his head coach since the fine was levied. “I think that’s the most misleading part of it. I could see if I was told, but there was no conversation about it.”

Smith also seemed confused about the warning he reportedly received from the league after he untied the shoes of Shawn Marion while playing the Mavericks.

“It was one of those warnings, you really don’t know the outcome of it,” Smith said. “You don’t even know if it was a warning or what it was. But at the end of the day it is what it is, I can’t change anything now.”

When asked if the punishment exceeded the crime, considering it has now affected his playing time as well as his pocketbook, Smith still didn’t seem to understand what all the fuss was about.

“It’s funny because the first time it was done, everybody thought it was hilarious,” he said. “And the second time it was done, it wasn’t even done. But at the end of the day it is what it is. I’m not going to fight it. We play hard, we win, I’m happy. If we play hard and lose, I’d have something to say. As long as we keep winning, I’m fine.”

Smith was signed to a three-year, $18 million contract in free agency by the Knicks last summer, a fragile deal in terms of J.R.’s past transgressions, but one that was in line with last season’s Sixth Man of the Year performance.

He’s followed that up with irresponsible behavior and below average basketball, however, so it’s no wonder he was questioning whether or not he has a future with the franchise.

“Honestly, I don’t even know at this point,” he said. “At one point I was for sure, and now it’s rocking the boat. But it is what it is, it’s the nature of the business.”

It doesn’t have to be, for most players. But Smith is unique, and always has been. He could greatly help the Knicks if he becomes focused on the game once again, instead of worrying about creating on-court foolishness during breaks in the action.

“It was a joke, but a joke gone wrong,” he said.

At this point, that is quite the understatement.

—Brett Pollakoff

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source:

https://twitter.com/KDTrey5/status/421540931280461824

This came after a photo of Kevin Durant smoking what he said was a hookah was tweeted out then deleted. There’s no reason not to believe him. — Kurt Helin

source:

Knicks 102, Heat 92: What is it with the Knicks having the Heat’s number? The Knicks won the season series last season and on Thursday night put together a run at the end of the third, start of the fourth that gave them the game. Brett Pollakoff was at the game and wrote about it in more detail. — KH

Nuggets 101, Thunder 88: Denver looked pretty good in this one, with Ty Lawson using his quickness to break down the Thunder defense, Randy Foye shooting over the top of it (6-of-9 from three) and Evan Fournier coming in off the bench to drop 19 and look solid. We broke this game down in more detail here. — KH

Derrick Rose: “I want to play the rest of my life” in New York

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 28:  Derrick Rose #25 of the New York Knicks dribbles up court against the Oklahoma City Thunder during the second half at Madison Square Garden on November 28, 2016 in New York City. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
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When a player says he doesn’t want to stay in a city — *cough* Rudy Gay *cough* — it’s news. Aside from that, a player saying he want to spend the rest of his career with the team he is currently on is right out of the Crash Davis/Bull Durham book of clichés.

Derrick Rose has read that book. He’s said those words before. However, it sounds like he was sincere in telling Peter Walsh at SLAM he likes what he sees with the Knicks and wants to stay in the city that doesn’t sleep.

“We’re building the culture,” Rose said. “We’re building the foundation now. I’m under a one-year contract so of course I want to play the rest of my life here. But it takes time, it takes patience to figure out how every one is going to fit, if it is going to fit and going from there.”

Here’s the question Phil Jackson (or whoever is in charge next summer should he opt out) needs to ask with every player/personnel move made going forward:

How does this person fit with Kristaps Porzingis?

That man is the future in Madison Square Garden. Frankly, he’s the present, too — he’s better than Carmelo Anthony right now. The Knicks need to make moves going forward that highlight Porzingis’ strengths (like playing him at the five).

Rose should fit fairly well with that right now as a pick-and-roll point guard to pair with Porzingis’ ability to pop out to the arc or roll to the rim. That said, when Rose and Porzingis have been paired on the court this season, the Knicks have been outscored by 3.9 per 100 possessions, mostly because the team defense has been a disaster. That doesn’t mean it can’t work, so long as you’re not going to run a lot of triangle, Rose understands he needs to feed Porzingis a lot, and there are other shooters on the floor. Rose can be a solid point guard for the Knicks going forward. At least as long as he can stay healthy.

Whether he comes back to New York will really come down to money — the Knicks should make a fair offer for a solid starting point guard in the NBA, then if another team comes in over the top live with it.

But for Rose, he’s in a New York state of mind.

Report: Grizzlies likely to sign Toney Douglas

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS - APRIL 06:  Toney Douglas #16 of the New Orleans Pelicans drives against Amir Johnson #90 of the Boston Celtics during the first quarter at TD Garden on April 6, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
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The Grizzlies have searched high and low for a point guard after Mike Conley‘s injury.

It seems they’ve found one:

Toney Douglas.

Michael Wallace of Grizzlies.com:

Memphis will be eligible to add a 16th player as long as it has four players who’ve missed three straight games and will continue to miss time. Brandan Wright, Chandler Parsons and James Ennis already qualify. Conley and Vince Carter would qualify by not playing tomorrow.

Andrew Harrison has played well since Conley went down, but over a larger sample, the team has struggled with him or Wade Baldwin running the point. Douglas – who has played for the Knicks, Rockets, Kings, Warriors, Heat and Pelicans – is fine. At this point, the Grizzlies will probably take fine and drop Baldwin from the regular rotation.

Other Memphis players could get healthy before Conley returns and put the team in a roster crunch once it no longer qualifies for hardship. Drop a better player or run short on point guards? But that’s a future problem. Adding Douglas will immediately strengthen the Grizzlies – once they can officially sign him.

Report: NBA season likely to start 7-10 days earlier under new CBA

TORONTO, ON - NOVEMBER 16:  Jonas Valanciunas #17 of the Toronto Raptors and Zaza Pachulia #27 of the Golden State Warriors contest the opening tipoff during the first half of an NBA game at Air Canada Centre on November 16, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)
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The 2016-17 NBA season began Oct. 25 – which was the earliest start date in 36 years. Only 1985-86 even matched it.

But with a new Collective Bargaining Agreement bringing a shortened preseason, the league will begin regular-season play even sooner in coming years.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

League sources say there’s a strong likelihood that the start of the 2017-18 season will be moved up a week to 10 days

We’re hearing that opening night next season is likely to fall in the Oct. 15-20 range

With the exception of a lockout producing a Christmas opening day in 2011, the season has started on a Tuesday for the last 18 years. Assuming that continues, the 2017-18 season would begin Oct. 16.

This seems like a good change. A full season has generally been 82 games in 170 days. Fitting those 82 games into a longer span allows for fewer back-to-backs. The preseason is too long, anyway. Teams often sit their top players for those exhibitions.  As long as training camp begins the same time, this won’t shorten the offseason. Everyone will just have a less grueling regular season.

Maybe teams will even rest players during games less often.

Report: Players on two-way contracts will have $50,000-$75,000 salary while in D-League under new CBA

Fort Wayne Mad Ants v Santa Cruz Warriors - 2015 D-League Finals Game Two
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The new Collective Bargaining Agreement will reportedly allow for two-way contracts – deals that pay one salary while a player is in the NBA and another while he’s in the D-League.

But what will that compensation look like?

Currently, players are on either D-League or NBA contracts. Players on D-League contracts will earn $26,000 or $19,000 this season. Players on NBA contracts have a minimum salary of $543,471. Even when assigned to the D-League, players on NBA contracts continue to receive their D-League salary.

Marc Stein of ESPN provides a couple details on the new CBA:

  • Players on D-League contracts will continue to receive similar salaries.
  • Players on two-way NBA contracts will earn a salary of about $50,000 to $75,000 while assigned to the D-League. Presumably, that amount will be prorated.

That’s less than I expected for the D-League salary in two-way contracts. The big thing keeping down salaries for players on D-League contracts is that they’re NBA free agents. Why pay much for a player whose NBA rights you don’t hold, even if he’s on your affiliate? But players with two-way contracts will be beholden to a certain NBA team. I figured that’d earn them more than this.

At least they’ll likely receive a higher minimum while in the NBA.