Chicago Bulls v Miami Heat - Game Three

Luol Deng says Bulls made take-it-or-leave-it offer, he did not ask for $15 million


How badly did the Chicago Bulls really want to keep Luol Deng? The two sides couldn’t reach an agreement on an extension last summer.

It had been reported since Deng was traded to Cleveland for Andrew Bynum that the Bulls had made a last ditched take-it-or-leave-it offer to their All-Star small forward and he turned it down. A lot of rumors have sprouted up around that meeting and around the summer negotiations between the Bulls and Deng on an extension.

Deng tried to straighten everything out speaking with the Chicago Tribune.

He’s not bitter. And despite reports, he never asked for $15 million a year from the Bulls, who traded Deng to Cleveland on Monday in a financial move to create flexibility for the future.

“My thing is in the summer, I never came with a number,” Deng told the Tribune. “I heard on the radio that I asked for 15 (million). I would never ask for a number. We came to (general manager) Gar (Forman) last summer and we wanted to sit down and talk. And Gar didn’t want to talk. They felt like they wanted to wait and see how everything goes with Derrick (Rose).

“Three days before the trade, Gar called me upstairs and put three years, $30 million on the table. Take it or leave it. No negotiation. I said no and that was it. But 15? That’s the only thing that upset me. I’m not upset with the organization. I want everyone to understand that. If I was a GM, would I make that move? Maybe.”

Deng went on to say he wanted to stay a Bull his entire career, it just didn’t work out.

The Bulls made business decisions, both in the summer when they didn’t want to talk extension and in the trade talks. That three-year offer was one the Bulls knew Deng would reject, which is why they put it on the table.

Thibodeau can’t be happy with this, but the Bulls made a smart decision to retool on the fly over the next couple years and contend again.

As for Deng, it will be interesting to see what he draws on the open market — he brings strong defensive skills and can work as a second, ideally third, offensive option on a good team. But he needs to be with the right star and there are questions how well the 29-year-old will age. My guess at his price point is probably more than $10 million a year, but not the $14.3 he made this season. Something like four-years, $48 million, and a number of teams may offer that. Deng will have options.

James Harden: “I am the best player in the league. I believe that.”

James Harden, Stephen Curry
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James Harden was the MVP last season — if you ask his fellow NBA players.

The traditional award (based on a media vote) went to Stephen Curry (in the closest vote in four years), and that was the right call (in my mind). But from the time it happened Harden did not buy it. And he still doesn’t buy it. In the least — and he’s using that as fuel for this season. That’s what he told Fran Blinebury over at

“I am the best player in the league. I believe that,” he said. “I thought I was last year, too.”

Well, it’s a more realistic claim than Paul George’s.

“But that award means most valuable to your team. We finished second in the West, which nobody thought we were going to do at the beginning of the year even when everybody was healthy. We were near the top in having the most injuries. We won our division in a division where every single team made the playoffs.

“There’s so many factors. I led the league in total points scored, minutes played. Like I said, I’m not taking anything away from Steph, but I felt I deserved the Most Valuable Player. That stays with me.”

That’s very Kobe Bryant of you to turn that into fuel. Defining the MVP Award is an annual discussion that nobody agrees on.

I could get into how Harden was the old-school, traditional stats MVP, how that ignores how Steve Kerr used Curry, and how that opened up the Warriors’ offense to championship levels. Curry put up numbers, but he was also the distraction, the bright star that Kerr used to open up looks for Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, and others. Curry’s strength was not just what he did with the ball in his hands, but his gravity to draw defenders even when he didn’t. Did the Warriors stay healthier than the Rockets? No doubt. Should Curry be penalized for that?

It’s simple for Harden — if he can put up those numbers again, if he can be the fulcrum of a top offense, he will be in the discussion for MVP again. And, if he can lead the Rockets beyond the conference finals, nobody will talk about that MVP snub anyway.