New York Knicks v Indiana Pacers

Kurt Thomas readying for comeback with a contender, which disqualifies one prominent team


Kurt Thomas is considering a comeback, his agent told Marc Berman of the New York Post.

And why shouldn’t Thomas?

He’d make $8,232.39 every day he’s under contract. It’s not bad work if you can get it.

But can Thomas get it?

Thomas – now 41 years old – actually performed well in limited playing time with the New York Knicks last year. Per 36 minutes, he averaged 8.9 points, 8.2 rebounds and 1.5 blocks. Not too shabby for a backup big man with loads of experience.

But his season ended early when he suffered a stress fracture in his foot and the Knicks waived him. Thomas’ agent says his client is healthy now, though he’s obviously biased, and it’s very difficult to look past any injury to a player that age.

So, it’s possible a team signs Thomas, but the odds seem against him – especially because he’s not pitching himself to teams. Thomas’ agent, Jerry Hicks, via Berman:

“If the right call comes, he’d come back,’’ Hicks told The Post. “He’d only play for a club that has a legitimate chance at winning a championship. Not the Knicks, I can tell you that.’’

If Thomas is trying to come back, best of luck. It won’t be easy.

If this was just a ploy to take a public dig at the Knicks, well-executed.

Mark Cuban suggests supplemental draft for undrafted free agents

Mark Cuban
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A lot of people around the NBA have ideas to improve the draft, free agency and the D-League, and Mavericks owner Mark Cuban has never been shy about sharing his. His latest idea seems pretty logical: a supplemental draft for undrafted free agents.

Via Hoops Rumors:

“I would have a supplemental draft every summer for undrafted free agents of the current and previous 3 years,” Cuban wrote in an email to Hoops Rumors. “If you are more than 3 years out you are not eligible and just a free agent.”

The supplemental draft would have two rounds, and teams would hold the rights to the players they select for two years, Cuban added. Players can opt out and choose not to make themselves eligible, but those who get picked would receive fully guaranteed minimum-salary contracts when they sign, according to Cuban’s proposal.

“That would make it fun a few weeks after the draft and pre-summer league,” Cuban wrote. “It would prevent some of the insanity that goes on to build summer league rosters.”

It’s an interesting proposition. Most undrafted players who sign during the summer don’t get guaranteed contracts, so when deciding to enter this supplemental draft, they would have to weigh the value of having guaranteed money versus getting to decide where they sign. It’s unlikely that anything like this could happen anytime soon, because of all the hoops to jump through to get the league and the players’ union to sign off on it, but it’s a worthwhile idea that deserves some consideration in the next CBA negotiations.