The Extra Pass: A rookie report (plus Wednesday’s recaps)

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Due to injuries and the lack of a transcendent talent, this year’s draft class has been pretty underwhelming as a whole. Still, that doesn’t mean there haven’t been a few pleasant surprises along the way. Now that we’ve had a little more time to evaluate, let’s check in on three of the most impressive rookies from this year’s class.

Victor Oladipo, G, Orlando Magic

The jury is still out on Oladipo’s ability to be a starting point guard in the league, but don’t let the fuss over his natural position deter you from appreciating his special talent.

It’s a little hard to explain, but Oladipo has this bounce in his step that allows him to get exactly where he wants to go on the floor. It’s not particularly controlled or polished yet, but it’s a raw explosion of athleticism and quickness that should definitely translate to bigger scoring numbers in the future.

Although his per 36 stats (12.9 points, 4.2 rebounds, 3.6 assists) aren’t going to blow anyone away, they’re respectable and a solid base to build from. Ideally, Orlando will pair Oladipo with a tall point guard (like 2014 prospect Dante Exum) and allow Oladipo to focus on the little things that made him great at Indiana, like ball pressure and leaking out in transition.

Steven Adams, C, Oklahoma City Thunder

When you’re evaluating a rookie, it’s so important to consider the environment that he’s surrounded by. There’s a reason why teams with star players in place, like the San Antonio Spurs and Oklahoma City Thunder, keep hitting on their draft picks. The pressure is removed, and they’re coming into a team with a pecking order that’s already established.

Ask yourself this: would Steven Adams look this good on, say, the Cleveland Cavaliers?

Probably not – and that’s not meant to discredit what Adams has been able to do so far this season. His ability to hang around the baseline, catch passes and finish at the rim is a big upgrade from Kendrick Perkins, and defensively he’s been active both on the glass and with contesting shots (10.2 rebounds and 2.1 blocks per 36 minutes).

Adams isn’t getting it done with any bells and whistles, but rather by just accepting his role and using his size and athleticism to his advantage. He should be playing a pretty substantial role come playoff time for a title contender, which is no small feat for a rookie.

Giannis Antetokounmpo, F, Milwaukee Bucks

When the Bucks announced that the 19-year-old lanky wing was going to play in the NBA this year, it came as a bit of a surprise. But now, he’s already a starter and not likely to lose his spot anytime soon.

It seems like at least once a game, Giannis will make a play that will absolutely take your breath away. He’s surprisingly smooth with the ball, and he’ll be a nightmare to stop in transition for a long time in this league. With 7.4 rebounds per 36 minutes, Giannis is already one of the better rebounding wings in basketball.

Perhaps no player in this draft class has more raw potential, and that’s on both ends of the floor. We’ve seen long players before with freakish athleticism, but rarely are they as coordinated as Giannis is. Once he develops a few more reliable skills and a dependable jumper, watch out. Alongside John Henson, Milwaukee has a few franchise building blocks to work with going forward.

—D.J. Foster

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Mavericks 87, Wizards 78: This wasn’t a pretty game — the winning team shot 38.5 percent — but it was close the entire way as neither team ever had a double-digit lead. What mattered is the Mavericks controlled the fourth quarter, went on a 9-0 run, won it 28-17, and with that won the game. The start of this one was scary for Dallas as Dirk Nowitzki went down on the second play of the game, then the Wizards jumped out to an 11-3 lead, but then Dallas went on a 14-4 run of their own and by the end of the quarter Dirk had his ankle re-taped and was back. Monta Ellis had 23 for Dallas to lead the way. Washington is now 1-8 against teams over .500.

Raptors 95, Pacers 82: Good teams have sloppy days and that was the case with the Pacers — but don’t take anything away from the Raptors, who did the little things. Jonas Valanciunas played Roy Hibbert well and had the Pacers big man in foul trouble most of the game. Kyle Lowry was a facilitator who had 14 assists. Then there was DeMar DeRozan — Paul George forced him into bad shots (long twos) but in the fourth quarter he hit them and had 10 of his 26. This was an even game midway through the fourth but the Raptors went on a 10-1 run and pulled away at the end. Toronto won the second half 55-38.

Timberwolves 124, Pelicans 112: These are the kinds of games that are going to be big in the West for teams scrambling to make the playoffs — the win pushes Minnesota to 16-16, drops New Orleans to 14-16. This wasn’t a defensive battle but Minnesota won it as they shot 55.7 percent and had an offensive rating of 124.7 points per 100 possessions. Kevin Love and Nikola Pekovic combined for 43 points as Minnesota had seven players in double figure. New Orleans shot themselves in the foot turning the ball over on 32.5 percent of their possessions.

Sixers 114, Nuggets 102: This says everything you need to know about the slump Denver is in — it never seemed like they were in this one the entire second half. At home. To a team not built to win a lot of games this season. Denver has now lost eight straight. For once the Nuggets got off to a good start but a 13-2 Sixers run late in the second gave them a lead and Philly just owned second half. Evan Turner had 23 points to lead seven Philly players in double figures.

Clippers 112, Bobcats 85: Charlotte does not just roll over and they didn’t in this one, they played the Clippers even for the second half. Then Los Angeles opened the second half on a 7-0 run and they ran away with it from there. Blake Griffin had 31 points on the night and was 7-of-10 shooting from the midrange (plus he even nailed a three). The other key for the Clippers was Jared Dudley breaking out of his slump and going 6-of-9 from three on his way to 20 points.

Kobe Bryant says he didn’t even have NBA League Pass until a month ago (VIDEO)

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What has retired all-time NBA great Kobe Bryant been doing with his time? A little of this, a little of that. Apparently that doesn’t include watching non-national NBA games.

Speaking with ESPN’s Jemele Hill and Michael Smith on SC6, Bryant revealed that he went to go watch a little NBA while he was getting a workout in at his house and realized he didn’t have the NBA package hooked up on his cable.

Via Twitter:

I don’t know if I totally buy this. On one hand, Kobe is a busy guy and he did spend two decades living and breathing the NBA night in and night out. I would expect that after all that time he might want some kind of relief.

Then again, to think that Kobe doesn’t have multiple assistants that would have handled that sort of thing already is sort of silly. The only benefit here is Kobe trying to sell that he’s just relaxing and not paying attention to the league too much, which is hilarious.

Kobe, we all know who you are by now. You’re watching the league, man. You’re Kobe. We get it. You didn’t suddenly turn into The Dude.

Let’s just hope Kobe’s League Pass works right off the bat. We all know how much of a hassle it can be.

Damian Lillard dismisses playoff expectations as pressure, says it insults regular people

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The Portland Trail Blazers have had a disappointing season thus far. The team is just 34-38 before their game with the Los Angeles Lakers on Sunday, and they’re battling it out for the last spot in the Western Conference playoffs with the Denver Nuggets.

This comes as after expectations rose greatly following the 2015-16 campaign which saw the Blazers finish 44-38, good enough for the No. 5 spot in the West.

Portland has looked better after trading Mason Plumlee to Denver in exchange for Jusuf Nurkic, but it might be too little too late. Meanwhile, team leader Damian Lillard isn’t bowing to the idea that last season’s good fortune raised the bar so much that it put undue pressure on his team.

Speaking with Sporting News, Lillard said he thinks the idea is really more about pressure vs. challenges.

Via SN:

Pressure, nah. Fam, this is just playing ball. Pressure is the homeless man, who doesn’t know where his next meal is coming from. Pressure is the single mom, who is trying to scuffle and pay her rent. We get paid a lot of money to play a game. Don’t get me wrong — there are challenges. But to call it pressure is almost an insult to regular people.

Look at the Wizards, they were kind of on the same wave as us. Didn’t even make the playoffs while we did. Now this year they’re the second-best team in the East. The adversity made them better. It can make us better, too. What I come from and my background made me who I am. As comfortable as I am with the good times, I’m also comfortable in adversity. Yeah, I might feel some type of way when somebody comes for me or says my name. But when it’s all said and done, it ain’t gonna rock me.

This is interesting to hear an NBA player say out loud. One, because I’m not sure I entirely believe it. You can have pressure without it having to be something that threatens your overall wellbeing.

Then again, maybe we’re arguing linguistics here. There’s definitely a different emotion from, say, trying to make sure you make rent and aren’t evicted to the street vs. trying to make the NBA playoffs. If one emotion is being defined as pressure, it makes sense to call the other a challenge.

It’s also interesting to hear an NBA player speak in those kinds of terms. There are a few guys around the league who seem to be relatively grounded and give out quotes like this from time-to-time. The absurdity of the NBA — playing games, making millions, and having folks worship you — would easily bend reality for most of us.

In any case, the challenge of making the playoffs for Portland is not going to be an easy one to overcome. Going into Sunday’s matchup with the Lakers, the Trail Blazers are a game behind Denver for the final spot.

Portland will face Denver on Tuesday, March 28 in perhaps their most important game of the season.

Kobe Bryant’s “Musecage” is like if Sesame Street had an NBA film room (VIDEO)

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Kobe Bryant’s video “Musecage” aired on ESPN on Sunday, and it’s one of the craziest things I’ve watched on an NBA broadcast. That includes watching Kobe’s own alley-oop to Shaquille O’Neal in Game 7 of the 2000 Western Conference Finals.

Someone on Twitter called it a “drug-fueled Muppet nightmare” but that’s selling short how remarkable the video was. In it, Kobe delivered a message about finding motivation as a young basketball player alongside a talking “Lil’ Mamba” puppet.

But here’s where it gets good: this video was made true to Kobe’s own person. Despite the happy, glockenspiel-laden background music with puppet accompaniment, Kobe’s message in “Musecage” was to use the dark part of your psyche as motivation to conquer your enemies.

I’m dead serious.


It doesn’t get any more Kobe than that.

The first video ends with Kobe’s advice to Lil’ Mamba, who goes off to become strong by using the dark musings as his fuel. Meanwhile, the second video talks about — and I’m not kidding — tactics James Harden and Russell Westbrook use to defeat their opponents in the pick-and-roll.

It’s like if Sesame Street was also a film room session.

Needless to say, all 10 minutes of Musecage are incredible. I don’t mean that in any sarcastic way, either. Bryant has been working on his Canvas series for a while, and his message shines true to the person we’ve known for the last two decades.

Use your happy feelings to push yourself? No! Use self-doubt as a motivator to Jawface your way through to six championship rings.

He debuted the original episode on Christmas Day, and it too had a kid-friendly feel.

I literally cannot wait for the next edition in this series.

Mark Cuban on Blake Griffin’s fall vs. JJ Barea: “We sent flowers to his family, condolences”

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The Dallas Mavericks and Los Angeles Clippers got into a bit of a scuffle the other night during their game. Clippers big man Blake Griffn and Mavericks PG JJ Barea tussled, with Barea earning a Flagrant 2 and an ejection for putting his hands on Griffin’s neck and pushing him to the ground.

It really was a sight to see, whether Griffin flopped or not.

Meanwhile, Mavericks owner Mark Cuban was asked about the incident and responded with some heavy sarcasm that feels par for the course.

Via Twitter:

Griffin does have a bit of a reputation for acting and flopping, and Barea is hilariously undersized compared to him. Then again, the throat is a vulnerable area. Who knows if the fall was real or fake?

I’m just glad Cuban has a sense of humor about it.