LeBron James, Wesley Johnson

Was LeBron James justified to complain about Miami Heat’s Christmas road game?


The Miami Heat beat the Los Angeles Lakers on Wednesday, extending Miami’s win streak to six games, an active NBA best.

The Heat should feel good.

The Heat do feel good.

But there was still a little griping before Miami’s Christmas title with the Lakers, played in Los Angeles.

Ethan Skolnick of Bleacher Report:

Truth be told, LeBron James didn’t really want to be here. None of them did. It never made much sense, a viewpoint that Dwyane Wade—among others—made clear to Adam Silver last month, when the commissioner-in-waiting visited the Miami Heat. Silver promised the players that, if they won another championship, they would be home for the next Christmas.

“Great incentive, huh?” James quipped prior to Miami’s mostly uneven but occasionally electric 101-95 win against the Los Angeles Lakers. “Growing up, I thought that was a rule. I don’t know if it was a rule, but I just thought that was like given. I don’t remember ever, besides, I guess, I don’t know if I’ve ever seen M.J. play on the road on Christmas. Maybe in the Garden, maybe.”

“I always thought if you win a championship, you kind of get some perks,” James said. “But we’ve been on the road, we’ve definitely been on the road. But it’s alright. Whatever.”

I’d never heard of the defending NBA champion being entitled to a home game on Christmas before reading this, but recent history supports LeBron’s claim.

The previous four defending champions – including LeBron’s Heat in 2012 – played at home on Christmas.

But before that, there was hardly a definitive Christmas schedule for the defending champion.

Since the league began scheduling Christmas games in 1947, defending champions have been more likely to not play at all on Christmas than play at home. Here are the splits:

  • Home: 23
  • Road: 20
  • None: 24

The defending champion usually playing on Christmas is just a recent phenomenon. Between 1978 and 1987, no defending champion played on Christmas. Since then, the splits favor more home games, but hardly definitively:

  • Home: 13
  • Road: 8
  • None: 5

Here’s the Christmas location for every defending champion in league history (click to enlarge):



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Trying to find a way to give LeBron the benefit of the doubt proves difficult. Not even back-to-back defending champs, like the Heat, get a guaranteed home Christmas game.

The 1998 Chicago Bulls – featuring Michael Jordan, whom LeBron cited – had just won back-to-back-to-back titles, and they didn’t even get a Dec. 25 game. In 1995, the Houston Rockets were defending champions, and they had to play on the road, as did the Detroit Pistons in 1990 and Lakers in 1988.

LeBron is correct that defending champions get perks. This just isn’t one of them.

Carmelo Anthony drops 21 on Wizards in preseason Friday

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We had an efficient Carmelo Anthony sighting in the preseason.

Anthony and the Knicks went up against the Wizards and ‘Melo hit 10-of-15 shots to score 21 points. He also had four rebounds and four assists.

Derrick Williams had 23 points on 11 shots to lead the Knicks in scoring, and New York won 115-104.

Lucky? Klay Thompson reminds Doc Rivers which team lost to Rockets


There’s this overplayed angle talked about by some fans and pundits suggesting the Warriors just got lucky last season — for example, they faced a banged-up Rockets’ team in the conference finals then a Cavaliers’ squad without two of their big three through the Finals. Then there was Clippers’ coach Doc Rivers saying the Warriors were lucky not having to play the Clippers or Spurs in the postseason.

The Warriors are sick of hearing they were lucky.

Friday Klay Thompson fired back at Rivers, via CSNBayArea.com.

– “I wanted to play the Clippers last year, but they couldn’t handle their business.”
– “If we got lucky, look at our record against them last year (Warriors 3-1). I’m pretty sure we smacked them.”
– “Didn’t they lose to the Rockets? Exactly. So haha. That just makes me laugh. That’s funny. Weren’t they up 3-1 too?”
– “Yeah, tell them I said that. That’s funny. That’s funny.”

Warriors big man Andrew Bogut phrased it differently.

If you think the Warriors just won because they were lucky — you are dead wrong.

They were the best team in the NBA last season, bar none. They won 67 regular season games in a tough conference, then beat everyone in their path to win a title. Did they catch some breaks along the way, particularly with health? You bet. Magic Johnson, Michael Jordan, and Kobe Bryant didn’t win a title without catching some breaks along the way, either. Nobody does. Luck plays a role, but it was not the primary factor in why the Warriors are champs.

All this talk of them getting lucky is fuel for the fire they needed not to be complacent this season. Way to give the defending champs bulletin board material, Doc.