Derrick Rose

Chicago Bulls-Brooklyn Nets is NBA’s worst Christmas Day matchup since…

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The NBA has built a Christmas Day empire by featuring the league’s top teams and players on Dec. 25. It’s become an honor to play this day, and those in the league recognize the accomplishment of getting on the schedule. Fans see it too, annually expecting to see the NBA at its regular-season best.

That’s why matchups like today’s noon contest between Chicago Bulls (10-16) and Brooklyn Nets (9-18) – teams with a combined .358 winning percentage – stand out.

Of course, the NBA couldn’t have known these teams would struggle so much when creating the Christmas schedule.

The Bulls endured Derrick Rose’s growing pains as he returned from injury, only to see him hurt again. Luol Deng and Jimmy Butler have missed significant time, too (although both will be in the lineup on Christmas, as is Kirk Hinrich).

The Nets have also lost their top player, Brook Lopez, for the season. Even before that point, the team floundered under first-year Jason Kidd. Deron Williams, Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett have all looked old and have also dealt with injury.

These teams were supposed to be good, playoff squads for certain. Instead, they’re outside the playoff picture looking in.

So, that leads to the question, when was the last time teams entered a Christmas Day matchup with such a bad combined record?

Orlando Magic (7-22) and Cleveland Cavaliers (9-19), a combined .281 winning percentage, in 2003

The Cavaliers were a team on the rise. They’d won 17 games the year before and would go onto win 35 this season, 42 the next year and 50 the following year. They just hadn’t climbed far enough by December to be competitive in the playoff standings.

The Magic were also supposed to be climbing the NBA ladder. The season before, they made the playoffs as the No. 8 seed and led the top-seeded Detroit Pistons 3-1 before blowing their advantage. Instead of building off its strong playoff series – in terms of overall play, not how it ended – Orlando won its season-opener then lost 19 straight to begin this season. After firing Doc Rivers, they’d come around slightly, but they remained a bad team.

Though the NBA probably expected – or at least hoped for – better teams, this game was never really about the teams.

It was about the individual matchup: LeBron James vs. Tracy McGrady.

LeBron was a rookie, already a national star, and McGrady had made the last two All-NBA first teams. If Kobe Bryant had staked claim as the NBA’s top wing player, it was only a matter of time until these two were duking it out for No. 2. So, why not begin the discussion just 29 games into LeBron’s professional career?

In that regard, the matchup more than lived up to its billing.

LeBron had 34 points and six assists, but McGrady had 41 points and 11 assists to lead the Magic to a 113-101 overtime victory.

So, perhaps it’s not fair to judge this game on the team’s records, because it was about the individual stars. In that case, omitting this one, the Bulls and Nets are the worst teams in a Christmas Day matchups since…

Cleveland Cavaliers (5-20) and Atlanta Hawks (11-17), a combined .302 winning percentage, in 1984

I can’t figure why this game was ever placed on the Christmas Day.

Neither had much hype entering the season – for good reason.

I guess the Hawks had won 40, 43 and 42 games in the three seasons prior, but they’d lost in the first round each year. Perhaps, the NBA saw a team ready to take the next step, but Atlanta didn’t do that until the following two years, winning 50 and 57 games. In 1984-85, the Hawks were just a run-of-the-mill bad team, going 34-48.

The Cavaliers were a team on the rise – 15 wins to 23 wins to 28 wins entering the season. And even though they kept climbing, finishing the year 36-46, they were digging themselves from too deep a hole to be relevant.

And if it was about the individual matchup – Dominique Wilkins vs. World B. Free – that disappointed, too. Wilkins scored 19 points on 9-of-22 shooting, and Free had 16 on 5-of-17.

Still, everything else going wrong, this was a competitive game, Cleveland winning, 109-106.

And maybe that offers some hope for Bulls-Nets. No matter how bad the teams are, Christmas Day has a way of bringing out their best.

Whether that’s the case today or night, at least know you’re seeing history. Christmas Day matchups this bad come around only once a generation of player.

Report: Heat complained to ‘highest levels of the league office’ about favorable calls for Jeremy Lin and Kemba Walker

Charlotte Hornets' Kemba Walker (15) is congratulated by Jeremy Lin (7) after making a basket against the Sacramento Kings in the second half of an NBA basketball game in Charlotte, N.C., Monday, Nov. 23, 2015. The Hornets won 127-122 in overtime. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
AP Photo/Chuck Burton
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The Heat and Hornets are clearly tiring of each other, six games of testiness culminating with Game 7 today.

One particular battle line being drawn is over Jeremy Lin (6.3) and Kemba Walker (5.5), who lead players in this series in free-throw attempts per game.

Marc Stein:

ESPN sources say that one of the factors that ramped up the tension between the teams stems from Miami complaints to the highest levels of the league office after Game 4 about what the Heat deemed to be favorable officiating for Jeremy Lin and Kemba Walker.

Lin and Walker relentlessly driven to the basket. That’s why they’ve attempted so many free throws. If Miami wants to keep them off the line, trap them harder on the perimeter.

That said, this is part of playoff gamesmanship. If the Heat plant a seed with referees – through the league office or otherwise – that Lin and Walker are drawing too many fouls, maybe that affects a call today. With the margins so narrow, every little bit helps.

Watch LaMarcus Aldridge drop 38 on Thunder

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Oklahoma City has more than a few adjustments to make after a brutal defensive effort in Game 1 of their series against San Antonio, but at the top of the list is sticking with LaMarcus Aldridge on defense.

He was killing them from the midrange, and more than half of his looks were uncontested — the Thunder know he can knock down that shot, right?

It was a fantastic performance from Aldridge; we’ll see if he faces tougher defense in Game 2.

NBA: Trail Blazers scored after uncalled illegal screen by Trail Blazers in final minutes

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Should we be preparing for Game 7 of the Trail Blazers-Clippers series today?

If the officials had called the final minutes of the last game correctly, maybe.

Portland won Game 6 to take the series 4-2, but a missed call a key missed call helped clinch.

With 1:45 left, Mason Plumlee got away with offensively fouling Jamal Crawford, according to the NBA’s Last Two Minute Report:

Plumlee (POR) sets the screen on Crawford (LAC) without giving him room to avoid the contact.

A correct call would’ve meant a Trail Blazers turnover. Instead, Damian Lillard ended the possession with two made free throws.

Portland’s advantage when the Clippers began intentionally fouling: two.

Would the Clippers have won if the refs called Plumlee’s offensive foul? Impossible to say. The final 1:45 could’ve played out much differently.

But this missed call, the only error in the Last Two Minute Report, certainly boosted the Trail Blazers’ odds.

Four Things to Watch in two Game 7s Sunday

during game six of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals of the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Time Warner Cable Arena on April 29, 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.
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It’s what the playoffs are all about — win or go home Game 7s. Pressure, drama, unlikely stars Sunday is going to have it all. Here are a few things to watch:

1) Can Miami’s jump shooters have another hot game? Dwyane Wade got the headlines (and he earned them) for his Game 6 performance (everyone except purple shirt guy was impressed), but the real key for the Heat to force a Game 7 was they were hitting their jumpers — or at least enough of them. In their three losses, Miami shot 33.7 percent from 3 feet out to the arc, but in Game 6 the Heat shot 43.5 percent in that range, plus knocked down eight threes. The Hornets have packed the paint all series, when the Heat hit their jumpers they win. It’s that simple.

2) Does Kemba Walker have one more big game in him? Walker was fantastic in Game 6 (37 points), and he’s been very good in the Hornets’ victories. He’s going to penetrate and get some shots inside eight feet, but will he be able to finish? And, more importantly, will he hit his threes when they pack the paint on him? If Walker has a huge game, Charlotte very likely moves on.

3) Is Toronto too far into their own head? No team has more pressure on them to advance out of the first round than Toronto after two previous years of getting bounced in the first round, and they will feel that weight at home in Game 7 against Indiana. Will Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan step up with big games in the biggest moments of their careers, or will they succumb to the moment and the Pacers defense? For all the Xs and Os that do matter in this game, how the Raptors handle the pressure will be key.

4) Can the Pacers again get a few quality minutes when Paul George sits? In the Pacers comfortable Game 6 win, George got a rest in the second quarter and the Pacers were +5 while he sat. That was a huge step up from Game 5, where the Pacers were -18 when he was out for less than 7 minutes. If Indiana — by playing some starters such as Myles Turner — doesn’t have a huge bench drop off when George rests a few minutes their odds of winning go way up. We know Paul George can handle the moment.