Indiana Pacers v Miami Heat

Wednesday night NBA grades: Vintage Dwyane Wade sighting


Our quick look around a busy night in the NBA, or what you missed while trying to buy some beer and pay for it with a live alligator…

source:   Dwyane Wade, Miami Heat. The last time Wade scored 30 points or more in a game it was Game 4 of the NBA Finals, so it’s been a while. Wade had to step up early when LeBron James got into foul trouble Wednesday and he had 8 points in the first quarter, helping keep Miami in it. Wade looked like his vintage self aggressively attacking the paint — he was 11-of-15 inside 8 feet on the night (his jumper was on as well, he hit 3-of-6 from the midrange). A lot of those close shots came in transition with Wade getting out and moving well on the break. He finished with 32 points. Just a reminder that if Wade is on in the playoffs the Heat are that much more dangerous.

source:   Kemba Walker, Charlotte Bobcats. He had a nice first half but he was key in the third quarter as the Bobcats came back to make this a game, scoring 11 of his 29 in that quarter. All night Walker just abused new Raptor Greivis Vasquez and was able to get by him and create good looks. Then he hit the game winner — look at how well he stops on a dime and is able to go up quickly with a balanced shot. That’s impressive.

source:   Anthony Davis, New Orleans Pelicans. He was back a month earlier than expected after missing time with a broken hand and he looked like he hadn’t missed a step — 24 points and 12 rebounds. It wasn’t near enough to lift the Pelicans past the Clippers, but the fact Davis (and Tyreke Evans) are back means you’re going to see better play from New Orleans coming up.

source:   Kevin Love, Minnesota Timberwolves. He had 17 points 11 rebounds and 8 assists — and that was just in the first half. Love and Nikola Pekovic (who had 30 points on the night) just dominated red-hot Portland inside and Love finished with 29 points, 15 rebounds and 9 dimes as the Timberwolves picked up a quality win at home.

source:   Brandon Knight, Milwaukee Bucks. I’ve knocked him the past so we need to credit him when he scores a career high 36 points. Even if he did have eight turnovers, just three assists and did all of this against the weak defense of Beno Udrih. Knight to his credit was aggressive against a weak defender and took advantage of the situation. He needs to do that more consistently. He also needs to be under more control in transition. But we’re being positive here, and Knight had a good game in the loss to New York.

Gilbert Arenas: Caron Butler’s version of gun incident ‘false’

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Caron Butler recently detailed the Gilbert Arenas-Javaris Crittenton gun incident.

In a since-deleted – but screenshot-captured – Instagram post, Arenas gives his description:

The biggest differences between Butler’s and Arenas’ versions:

1. Arenas claims he wasn’t the one who owed Crittenton money, that the feud escalated over Arenas prematurely showing his hand during a card game.

2. Arenas says he told Crittenton to pick a gun to shoot Arenas with – not to pick a gun he’d get shot by Arenas with.

Players’ union, NBA to set up cardiac screening for retired players

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First it was Darryl Dawkins. Then it was Moses Malone.

Two all-time great players who recently died — and at t0o young an age, 58 and 60 respectively — from undiagnosed heart conditions. Even before that, recognizing the issue the NBA players union and the league itself were setting up supplemental health coverage to provide cardiac screening for retired players, something ESPN’s Jackie MacMullan recently broke.

The joint effort between union executive director Michele Roberts and NBA commissioner Adam Silver — at a time when there still may be potentially acrimonious labor negotiations looming for their sides — is intended to ease the health concerns of its retired players.

Roberts said action from the players’ association on providing screening for its retired players is “imminent.”

“I wish I could give you an exact timetable, but we have to make sure all the components are in place,” Roberts told ESPN recently. “I will tell you we hope to have something sooner than later.”

The Cardiologists are affiliated with the NBA already, and some of the money will come from the league, while the union is both pitching in a chunk of cash and is the one organizing this, according to the report.

It’s good to Roberts and Silver working together on this. While you’d like to think this would be the kind of no-brainer move that the league and union would work together on, in the past the relationship didn’t always facilitate this sort of cooperation even on the obvious.

I’d like to think this bodes well for future labor talks, but I’m not willing to completely draw that parallel.