LeBron Wade

Heat come from 15 down to even season series with Pacers

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In the second battle of the season between the two clear leaders of the Eastern Conference, the defending champs showed that they have more than enough talent to come away with a win if given even the smallest of windows to do so.

The Pacers got out to a lead of as many as 15 points in Miami, but thanks the the Heat closing the game on a 12-2 run, they came away with the 97-94 victory that evened the season series at a game apiece.

In the first meeting between these two teams, things played out almost oppositely than they did in this one. Where the Heat started off strong and faded late in the first matchup, they were able to withstand the Pacers’ early assault and put together a late attack of their own that ultimately was the difference.

Indiana did what its done to opponents all season long for much of the first half, and that’s provide a lockdown defensive effort that allows them to gain separation. The Pacers have the league’s top defense in terms of points allowed per 100 possessions, and it was on display early in holding the Heat to just 41 points over the game’s first 24 minutes.

The second half was more of the same, but the fact that Roy Hibbert was only able to play 9:38 over the final two periods due to foul trouble brought on by an unnecessary gamble by his head coach may have played a bigger role in the final outcome than his team would have liked.

Hibbert picked up his fourth foul with the Pacers leading by nine and 9:20 to play in the third quarter. Pacers coach Frank Vogel chose to leave him in the game, apparently not wanting to lose momentum with the second half just barely underway. But it was a shortsighted decision that ultimately proved costly, as Hibbert picked up his fifth foul less than a minute later, which forced him out of action until the final six minutes or so of the game.

By the time he returned, Hibbert was out of rhythm and the Heat had found theirs.

The Pacers stabilized briefly, but the Miami run was coming. And when Chris Bosh hit a three-pointer to tie the game at 92, you just had a feeling that the Heat weren’t going to let this one get away.

A miss from Paul George on the next possession led to a three-on-two fast break, and LeBron James found Ray Allen on the wing for the three in transition that gave Miami the lead for good with just under a minute to play. George had a chance to tie it for the Pacers with four seconds left, but the three-pointer he launched from the top of the arc wasn’t close. Replays showed that LeBron had a hand on George’s waist from behind, but we all know the referees are reluctant to make calls like that with the game hanging in the balance, and in real time it didn’t seem like enough contact to warrant a whistle.

Dwyane Wade had his highest scoring game of the season, and finished with 32 points on 15-of-25 shooting. LeBron had a typically efficient performance with 24 points, nine rebounds and seven assists, while Paul George (25 points) and David West (23) did the bulk of the damage for the Pacers.

These two teams are clearly the class of the East, and these regular season matchups are simply part of the season-long chess match that would seem to be leading up to an inevitable rematch of last year’s epic seven game playoff series. Indiana had its chances, but all it took was one signature run by the defending champs to put this one in Miami’s win column and remind the Pacers just how difficult it will be to beat the Heat four times in seven games.

Report: Paul Pierce probably wants to come back and play for Clippers, but still thinking it over

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The Los Angeles Clippers still have Paul Pierce under contract. Not many minutes for him, but he has a roster spot.

Pierce probably wants come back but is thinking it all over, according to Brad Turner of the Los Angeles Times.

Pierce has been debating this with himself for a while now.

Pierce saw a dramatic drop off in production and how much he was used last season by Rivers. Pierce averaged a career-low 6.1 points per game on an also career low 48.9 true shooting percentage. His PER of 8.2 was also a career low. You get the idea. By the end of the season Pierce was mostly an afterthought for Doc Rivers (although he did start one game after Blake Griffin was out and the Clippers’ playoff dreams were toast).

Pierce would be more mentor than a key player on the court, but he would be on probably the third best team in the West, a team that capable of making a deep playoff run. Does he want to do that for one more season? You know Doc would welcome him.

Andrea Bargnani signing in Spain

NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 14:  Andrea Bargnani #9 of the Brooklyn Nets takes a shot as Andrew Nicholson #44 of the Orlando Magic defends at Barclays Center on December 14, 2015 in the Brooklyn borough of  New York City.NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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Andrea Bargnani said he would’ve played “for free” to prove himself with the Nets last season.

That would have been about the right price.

Bargnani suffered through a miserable season — full of injury, poor individual play and losing. Brooklyn eventually bought him out.

Now, the entire NBA might be finished with the former No. 1 pick.

Bargnani signed with Spanish team Saski Baskonia.

At age 30, he faces a long road back to world’s top league — if he even wants to try. Bargnani is a one-dimensional jump shooter, and he doesn’t even shoot that well.

It was ridiculous for the Knicks to trade a first-rounder for him, and that was three years ago already. Bargnani is only further from his peak now.

Maybe he carves out a niche in Europe, where his lack of physicality is less likely to be exposed. But Bargnani is no longer an NBA player.

Pat Riley: Dion Waiters ‘is not a room-exception player’

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK - MAY 12: Dion Waiters #3 of the Oklahoma City Thunder reacts after hitting a basket against the San Antonio Spurs  during the first half of Game Six of the Western Conference Semifinals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at the Chesapeake Energy Arena on May 12, 2016 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.   NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by J Pat Carter/Getty Images)
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The Heat signed Dion Waiters to a room-exception contract.

Heat president Pat Riley, via Barry Jackson of the Miami Herald:

“Dion is not a Room Exception player. He wanted to play for the Miami Heat and chose to forgo other more lucrative financial opportunities to be a part of our championship organization. We are very honored that he made the commitment to come to South Florida and sign with us. Dion is young, athletic and explosive, which fits in with our roster. He will add a great dimension for us at the off-guard spot. I really like the depth and versatility that we now have in our perimeter positions. Welcome aboard Dion!”

I’m really curious about those “more lucrative financial opportunities.”

The Thunder didn’t think Waiters was worth his one-year, $6,777,589 qualifying offer. They earmarked that money for a Russell Westbrook renegotiation-and-extension and don’t define the market themselves. But every team has other uses for its money than paying Waiters, and none deemed Waiters a priority.

How much could Waiters have gotten next season if he signed a multi-year deal rather than the 1+1 he inked with Miami? The whole “Waiters betting on himself” narrative falls apart if nobody was willing to bet more more on Waiters.

The 24-year-old is talented. But his ball-hogging, drifting focus and me-first attitude can be infuriating.

It behooves Riley to paint Waiters as more than a room-exception player, because that enhances Riley’s reputation as someone who lures free agents for less than market value. A big-time compliment from the influential Riley might have even part of Waiters’  contract negotiation.

But there’s a reason Waiters signed for the room exception. It has something to do with the type of player he is.

Report: Clippers exploring leaving Lakers at Staples Center, getting their own arena

LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 29:  Jamal Crawford #11 of the Los Angeles Clippers pulls up for a shot between Brandon Bass #2 and D'Angelo Russell #1 of the Los Angeles Lakers at Staples Center on January 29, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and condition of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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The Clippers don’t just play second fiddle to the Lakers in Los Angeles. They play second fiddle to the Lakers in their own arena.

Unless the Clippers want to move from the NBA’s second-biggest market, the former isn’t changing.

The Latter?

Kevin Arnovitz of ESPN:

The Clippers want to escape the Lakers’ shadow. Leaving the Staples Center wouldn’t turn the Clippers into L.A.’s team, but it’d give them a new avenue for attention — and revenue.

Of course, if the Clippers stay in the Staples Center, they’ll want the best terms possible. Leaking interest in a new arena only helps their bargaining position.