Cleveland Cavaliers v Los Angeles Clippers

Report: Dion Waiters accused Kyrie Irving, Tristan Thompson of playing “buddy ball.”


We knew that a couple of weeks ago after another ugly loss (29 points to the Timberwolves), the Cavaliers had a team meeting and in it things got a little tense — shouting, but not fisticuffs.

Not long after, Dion Waiters lost his starting spot to Matthew Dellavedova, which made sense as Waiters is shooting 39.9 percent this season and since he doesn’t bring much defense he needs to knock down shots. Then came the reports the Cavaliers are shopping Waiters around (and what they want in return is laughable).

Now comes a report of what happened in that team meeting that sort of ties everything together, via Chris Broussard at ESPN.

Irving called the meeting after the game, and every player spoke. When Waiters was given the floor, he criticized Thompson and Irving, accusing them of playing “buddy ball” and often refusing to pass to him. Thompson took umbrage with Waiters’ words and went back at him verbally. The two confronted each other, but teammates intervened before it could escalate into a fight.

However, Waiters and Irving are not close. Waiters believes the Cavaliers have a double standard when it comes to Irving, sources said. Waiters feels that while Irving is allowed to get away with loafing defensively, making turnovers and taking bad shots, he is taken out of games for such things. Waiters has shared his views with Brown and Grant.

News flash Dion: There is a double standard. On every team. The face of the franchise is treated differently, it’s a tradition that runs from George Mikan through Michael Jordan all the way to LeBron James. The team’s biggest star gets more leeway. You are not the face of the franchise Waiters, Irving is.

Irving is the guy the Cavaliers are building around. Tristan Thompson may not live up to all the hype but he looks like a solid rotation player. Waiters looks like a gunner who wants to create his own shot but isn’t efficient doing it – 40 percent of his offensive opportunities  this season come as the ball handler in the pick-and-roll but he shoots just 36.2 percent (stats via Synergy Sports).

What to take away from all this: Cleveland is going to move Waiters. Maybe sooner rather than later, but right now the offers that are going to come in are lowball ones, Cleveland has to be patient and get some leverage before making a move.

Report: Matt Barnes texted friend that he beat up Derek Fisher, spat in wife’s face

Derek Fisher, Matt Barnes, Russell Westbrook
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Grizzlies forward Matt Barnes reportedly attacked Knicks coach Derek Fisher for dating his estranged wife, Gloria Govan.

New details are emerging, and they cast Barnes in an even worse light.

Ian Mohr of the New York Post:

Sources told The Post that Barnes became incensed when his 6-year-old twin sons, Carter and Isaiah, called to tell him that Fisher was at the house.

Following the dust-up, Barnes, 35, texted a pal that he had not only assaulted Fisher, 41, but also took revenge on Govan, one source said.

“I kicked his ass from the back yard to the front room, and spit in her face,” the text read, according to the source.

If this becomes a criminal case, Barnes’ text could incriminate him.

In the court of public opinion, the presence of Barnes’ children and his spitting in his wife’s face make this even more disturbing.

Unfortunately, not everyone views it that way. Too many are laughing off the incident.

Albert Burneko of Deadspin had the best take I’ve seen on this situation:

When an accused domestic abuser shows up uninvited at a family party to—as a source put it to the New York Post—“beat the shit” out of someone for the offense of dating his ex, that is not a wacky character up to zany shenanigans. It is not reality TV melodrama or a cartoon or celebrities being silly. It is the behavior of a dangerous misogynist lunatic. It is an act of violent aggression. It is a man forcefully asserting personal property rights over a woman’s home, body, and life. It differs from what Ray Rice did in that elevator by degree, not by kind, and not by all that much.

I suggest reading it in full.