Andrew Bynum feels sharp pain every time he runs or jumps and probably will all season

7 Comments

We know when Andrew Bynum plays, and we know when he doesn’t.

Sometimes, it’s easy to evaluate Bynum’s health in those same binary terms.

Watching Bynum clearly reveals a combination of injury and rust have robbed him of his athleticism, but whether Bynum feels fine or not is a different story. He might feel well enough to play, but the rest is much grayer.

Jodie Valade of The Plain Dealer:

Any time Andrew Bynum runs up and down the court, he feels sharp pain in his knees. It’s not as bad as it was last season, when he didn’t play a single NBA game. It hurts most when he attempts to jump in any way or make any kind of explosive movement.

So he’s accepted that his game – for this season, at least, but maybe forever – will be limited to what he can accomplish from the space he takes up with his 7-foot, 285-pound frame.

“I’ll just stick to the floor,” Bynum said Monday. “Ground game. Position defense and position offense on the ground.”

Announcement: Pro Basketball Talk’s partner FanDuel is hosting a one-day $85,000 Fantasy Basketball league for Wednesday night’s games. It’s $25 to join and first prize is $9,000. Starts at 7pm ET on Wednesday. Here’s the FanDuel link.

That’s why Bynum has considered retirement. How many of you would continue your job if its basic responsibilities caused sharp pain, especially if you’d already made enough money to live comfortably for the rest of your life?

Here’s why Bynum hasn’t retired, though: He’s adjusting reasonably well.

Bynum has made just 8-of-23 shots in the restricted area this season (34.8 percent), well down from the 68.0 percent he made previously in his career. But his 2-point shooting outside the restricted area is up from 38.4 percent to 43.9 percent.

image

Defensively, Bynum has a career-high 5.8 block percentage. Cleveland’s opponents also shoot a little worse in the restricted area when Bynum is on the court. He can still jump a little to block shots, and he chooses his opportunities well.

But Bynum also camps out underneath the basket, because he lacks mobility. The Cavaliers’ opponents shoot considerably better in the paint but outside the restricted area when Bynum is on the court, and that partially explains why Cleveland’s defensive rating is worse with Bynum on the court.

To Bynum’s credit, it seems he’s making the most of his physical limitations.

How much is a physically limited Bynum worth, though?

The Cavaliers can waive Bynum by Jan. 7 and pay him just $6 million this season. There are other considerations besides how Bynum has produced so far – or even how he’ll produce the rest of this season. If he returns to peak form in 2014-15, though unlikely, Bynum would be a bargain at $12.54.

But a so-so jump-shooting center with limited defensive range just isn’t that valuable, even if he’s maximizing his value.

Utah’s Donovan Mitchell wins throwback Dunk Contest with Vince Carter tribute

Getty Images
Leave a comment

LOS ANGELES — The 2018 Dunk Contest went retro.

And it worked.

The throwbacks started with Cleveland’s Larry Nance Jr. going quick-change to pay tribute to his father, the 1984 winner of the Dunk Contest.

Nance later had the best dunk of the night, but it wasn’t enough in the face of Utah’s Donovan Mitchell‘s strong and consistent night highlight by his throwback dunk — donning a Vince Carter Toronto dinosaur jersey and doing VC’s famed 360 dunk — which got Mitchell the 48 points he needed to hold-off Nance and win the contest. It was over.

“Growing up I was a big dunker,” Mitchell said. “I wasn’t really much of a basketball player. I just dunked and played defense, and I watched a lot of Vince’s videos. I’ve been seeing what he’s been doing all year at his age, which is incredible.

“So I figured, you know, at my size if I was able to get it, it would be a great dunk and a way to finish it, you know. And actually, funny story is I haven’t made that dunk in like half a year. I tried it in practice the past two days and tried it this morning, didn’t make it. Tried it last night, didn’t make it… But to be able to make it was why I was so excited.”

Earlier in the night, Mitchell had done another tribute worn a Darrell Griffith jersey — Utah’s Dr. Dunkenstien, who went to Louisville like Mitchell — for an off-the-side-of-the-backboard jumping over Kevin Hart dunk.

“You know, just knowing your history, I think, is the biggest thing,” Mitchell said of the throwbacks. “Just understanding where this game originated, I guess the OGs of the game, I guess you would call it. But just understanding. Even if it’s just dunking. Whether it’s dunking in the NBA in general, Darrell Griffith, we went to the same school in college. I know Darrell very well. Both got drafted by the Jazz, and he was an incredible player. To be able to pay homage to him meant a lot to me.”

For my money, Nance had the dunk of the night, his first in the Finals, a double off-the-backboard throwdown that you had to see on replay to get (it wasn’t as evident in the building what he had done until it was re-shown on the big screen).

It was a fun contest all night long.

Mitchell (the leader in the Rookie of the Year race) started it off brilliantly — he brought out a second backboard, and did a self-alley-oop off one to the other.

Larry Nance Jr. did his tribute to his father with his first dunk, and on his second one came from behind the backboard, going around the world, and threw it down hard. That got him into the Finals.

Oladipo missed all three of his dunks in the first round, which almost doomed his night. He, however, did a dunk wearing the Black Panther mask for his second dunk, which impressed.

Mitchell said he wanted to beat Dennis Smith Jr. because the Mavericks’ point guard had beaten him in dunk contests for years. Smith had one monster dunk, when he went between the legs and threw it down hard and got the full 50. It just wasn’t enough to get Smith to the Finals.

Nance started off the final round by bringing out his father again to throw an alley-oop to a windmill. Mitchell responded with a self-alley-oop to a windmill that was flat-out wicked. That got Mitchell a 50-46 lead after one round of the Finals.

Then Mitchell went to Vince Carter and “it was over.”

Larry Nance Jr. throws alley-oop to himself, throws alley-oop to himself (video)

Leave a comment

LOS ANGELES — Cavaliers forward Larry Nance Jr. immediately motioned for the replay to be shown of this dunk. It was necessary to properly appreciate it.

Best dunk of the night.

Donovan Mitchell won the dunk contest, though.

Larry Nance Jr. plays tribute to father — rock-the-cradle dunk in Suns uniform

Associated Press
1 Comment

LOS ANGELES — Back in 1984, high-flying Larry Nance Sr. won the first NBA All-Star Dunk Contest with this set of dunks — most famously a rock-the-cradle move.

Larry Nance Jr. came into the 2018 Dunk Contest and went nostalgic — all the way back to the Suns’ throwback uniform and the same dunk.

That and a good second dunk got him into the Dunk Contest finals. In that round, Nance Sr. threw an alley-oop to his son for the windmill.

Donovan Mitchell throws alley-oop to himself – off second backboard (video)

Leave a comment

LOS ANGELES – Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell set a high standard with the first slam of the 2018 dunk contest.

Very creative. Very well-executed.

Looks like all that preparation paid off.