PBT Roundtable: What to expect when Kobe Bryant does return

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This is the latest in our looks around the NBA, with our PBT writers giving their thoughts on the topics of the day in the NBA. And right now, the big topic around the league is Kobe:

We’ve documented his return in excruciating detail, but the big questions remain: What does Kobe Bryant realistically bring to the Lakers upon his return? What should we expect from the Lakers going forward?

Kurt Helin: There is going to be a little rough patch at first, even Mike D’Antoni has said they will need to find a new team identity. That said, and despite the unreasonable expectations in Los Angeles (you’d swear they were getting the 2003 Kobe back if you listen to sports talk radio in L.A.), he can only help the Lakers offense. Of course, playing Papa Smurf at the three could only help the Lakers offense the way it has gone lately. The Lakers have actually played pretty close to league average defense this season, surprisingly, but their offense is 25th in the league in points per possessions, they lack shot creators and they don’t get to the line. Kobe is not going to be vintage — he’s going to be slowed, not as explosive — but even so he will draw defenders, get shots and get fouled. The Lakers are not going to be good with Kobe, but they can be an average team with dreams of a low playoff seed. And that was always the ceiling for this year’s Lakers anyway.

Dan Feldman: Immediately, he’ll muck up their offense. The Lakers are playing faster than they have since Showtime, and a likely still-somewhat-hobbled Kobe will disrupt that. But that adjustment period will be worth the long-term benefit of having such a great player on the court. As Kobe gets healthy and the Lakers learn to play with him, the Lakers’ offense should climb above 25th.

The Lakers have done a good job of remaining in the playoff periphery without Kobe, and his return should boost their postseason chances. Still, I think they’ll fall short and have to settle for a late lottery pick.

Darius Soriano: I agree with Kurt in that expectations, especially from the Kobe zealots, are that he will return as if he was never injured. Part of that is his history of playing well through various ailments and part of that is simply the mythology of Kobe Bryant. However, count me amongst those who are cautiously optimistic that he can perform at a reasonably high level offensively once he works his way back into game shape and gets a good feel for how he fits into this particular roster.

In terms of what he brings to this team, I think his biggest impact is two-fold. First, building on what Kurt said, Kobe instantly becomes the team’s most complete offensive player. He can score and pass; he can create for himself and others from the wing or the post. He’s a true threat from anywhere on the floor and that’s something the Lakers have missed this year. Second, and maybe more important, is that Kobe brings some needed leadership and helps this group continue to define its identity. This team has really taken on the personality of its coach — which isn’t necessarily a bad thing — but what they haven’t had is someone on the floor (rather than the sidelines) they can lean on or look to consistently on when things start to get tough. Kobe, for better or for worse, will gladly take on that burden and will shape the mindset of this group simply because of the weight he carries in the locker room and the gravity of his personality.

Did Gregg Popovich leave a $5,000 tip at a Memphis restaurant? (PHOTO)

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Gregg Popovich seems like a nice, considerate dude with a good head on his shoulders. The San Antonio Spurs coach made headlines this season as a leading advocate against many of the political changes occurring since the election of Donald Trump. He’s a thoughtful guy.

Popovich is also apparently a big tipper. A photo recently surfaced via Reddit and MySA.com that showed Popovich’s signature on a bill that had a $5,000 tip on it.

Nope, not a typo. $5,000.

Via MySA.com:

If you’re ever waiting on Pop, be sure to come back to refill his water as much as you can. It looks like it might be worth it for you.

Reports: Rajon Rondo “preparing to attempt to play in Game 5” but may wait until Game 6

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So you’re saying there’s a chance….

The Bulls have been lost at the once since Rajon Rondo went out with a fractured thumb — Jerian Grant and Michael Carter-Williams have been abject disasters to the point Isaiah Canaan was brought out of mothballs (and played fairly well in Game 4). The smart play would be a no point guard lineup with Dwyane Wade and Jimmy Butler as the ball handlers, but that will wear those guys down and will only work for stretches.

What the Bulls need is Rondo back. And that could happen for Game 5 Wednesday, if not maybe for Game 6, reports Shams Charania of The Vertical on Yahoo Sports, and Marc Stein of ESPN.

Rondo is tough, he might be able to play through this, although it likely would limit his effectiveness, particularly when he has the ball.

The Bulls will take whatever he can give. The Celtics woke up the last two games, and it’s going to be difficult to turn the tide without better play at the point.

Rockets owner appears to leave seat, yell at refs during matchup with Thunder (VIDEO)

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The Houston Rockets are in control of their series against the Oklahoma City Thunder, and were up 3-1 heading into Tuesday night’s Game 5 in Texas.

That did not stop what appeared to be Rockets owner Leslie Alexander from complaining to NBA referees. During gameplay. While standing directly next to an official, some 20 feet from his courtside seat.

Via Twitter:

Congratulations are in order to Bill Kennedy, the official in question, for keeping his cool. Or perhaps he just was so surprised by some dude yelling in his ear from right next to him he didn’t know how to react.

Brandon Jennings no fan of the NBA’s new Awards Ceremony event

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Come June 26, Drake will be on stage in New York City, handing out the NBA’s awards — Most Valuable Player, Defensive Player of the Year, Coach of the Year, and so on. (We need to set an under/over on the number of players Drake hugs that night.)

The NFL does it. The NHL does it. And the NBA has decided to follow suit with a broadcast awards ceremony where everything — except the All-NBA Team — will be announced that night. It’s happening because the broadcast partners want it.

Brandon Jennings is not a fan. Here is what the Wizards’ point guard Tweeted:

Jennings took down a Tweet that said if he had won the award he would have wanted to get it with the organization and his teammates around him. (And no, he knows he’s not winning the award. If you were going to put that in the comments be more creative.)

There’s something to what Jennings is saying. The NBA award roll out was awkward at times in previous years, but it gave the fans a chance to celebrate the awards with their favorite player. Now, everyone will watch it unfold on television from a ballroom in NYC. That feels a little colder. Also, we will get to see the reaction of those who don’t win (particularly this season, where several players can make a strong case for MVP).

It will be interesting to see how this first year goes, and how the league tweaks it going forward. The more than two month gap between the end of the regular season and the awards could feel a bit awkward. But we’re not going to knock the idea until we’ve seen it in action.