Los Angeles Lakers v Golden State Warriors

PBT Roundtable: What to expect when Kobe Bryant does return

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This is the latest in our looks around the NBA, with our PBT writers giving their thoughts on the topics of the day in the NBA. And right now, the big topic around the league is Kobe:

We’ve documented his return in excruciating detail, but the big questions remain: What does Kobe Bryant realistically bring to the Lakers upon his return? What should we expect from the Lakers going forward?

Kurt Helin: There is going to be a little rough patch at first, even Mike D’Antoni has said they will need to find a new team identity. That said, and despite the unreasonable expectations in Los Angeles (you’d swear they were getting the 2003 Kobe back if you listen to sports talk radio in L.A.), he can only help the Lakers offense. Of course, playing Papa Smurf at the three could only help the Lakers offense the way it has gone lately. The Lakers have actually played pretty close to league average defense this season, surprisingly, but their offense is 25th in the league in points per possessions, they lack shot creators and they don’t get to the line. Kobe is not going to be vintage — he’s going to be slowed, not as explosive — but even so he will draw defenders, get shots and get fouled. The Lakers are not going to be good with Kobe, but they can be an average team with dreams of a low playoff seed. And that was always the ceiling for this year’s Lakers anyway.

Dan Feldman: Immediately, he’ll muck up their offense. The Lakers are playing faster than they have since Showtime, and a likely still-somewhat-hobbled Kobe will disrupt that. But that adjustment period will be worth the long-term benefit of having such a great player on the court. As Kobe gets healthy and the Lakers learn to play with him, the Lakers’ offense should climb above 25th.

The Lakers have done a good job of remaining in the playoff periphery without Kobe, and his return should boost their postseason chances. Still, I think they’ll fall short and have to settle for a late lottery pick.

Darius Soriano: I agree with Kurt in that expectations, especially from the Kobe zealots, are that he will return as if he was never injured. Part of that is his history of playing well through various ailments and part of that is simply the mythology of Kobe Bryant. However, count me amongst those who are cautiously optimistic that he can perform at a reasonably high level offensively once he works his way back into game shape and gets a good feel for how he fits into this particular roster.

In terms of what he brings to this team, I think his biggest impact is two-fold. First, building on what Kurt said, Kobe instantly becomes the team’s most complete offensive player. He can score and pass; he can create for himself and others from the wing or the post. He’s a true threat from anywhere on the floor and that’s something the Lakers have missed this year. Second, and maybe more important, is that Kobe brings some needed leadership and helps this group continue to define its identity. This team has really taken on the personality of its coach — which isn’t necessarily a bad thing — but what they haven’t had is someone on the floor (rather than the sidelines) they can lean on or look to consistently on when things start to get tough. Kobe, for better or for worse, will gladly take on that burden and will shape the mindset of this group simply because of the weight he carries in the locker room and the gravity of his personality.

NBA denies Raptors’ protest of loss to Kings

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 26:  Jonas Valanciunas #17 and DeMar DeRozan #10 of the Toronto Raptors high five after defeating the Detroit Pistons in an NBA game at Air Canada Centre on October 26, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK (AP) — The NBA has denied the Toronto Raptors’ protest of their 102-99 loss to the Sacramento Kings on Nov. 20.

The league announced the decision Friday.

Toronto argued that the game officials incorrectly called for an instant replay review of whether the Raptors’ Terrence Ross released a 3-point shot prior to the expiration of actual time remaining.

The Replay Center official reviewed video of the play using a digital timer and determined the actual time remaining in the game expired before Ross released his shot, and the shot therefore did not count.

The league found that calling for an instant replay review in this case was consistent with the playing rules because the game officials determined that there was a clock malfunction.

Cody Zeller throws it down all over Bismack Biyombo (VIDEO)

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Nobody can stop the Zeller brothers!

Well, that’s not exactly true. But in this case, Bismack Biyombo tried and Cody Zeller threw it down with authority over him.

I’m not starting a “Cody Zeller for the dunk contest” campaign, but this was impressive.

Doc Rivers doesn’t think Clippers complain too much to referees

PORTLAND, OR - APRIL 29: Doc Rivers of the Los Angeles Clippers has some words with referee Sean Wright #4 in the first quarter of Game Six of the Western Conference Quarterfinals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at the Moda Center on April 29, 2016 in Portland, Oregon. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that by downloading and/or using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Steve Dykes/Getty Images)
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Pop quiz: Which team complains the most to the referees in the NBA?

You probably answered “the Clippers.” Most fans do. So do most NBA referees — And everyone else. Which is why after a recent loss to Golden State, veteran Marreese Speight (a Warrior last season) pointed to the Clippers complaining about the officiating as part of the problem.

He went on to say that the scouting report is you can get in the Clippers’ heads by knocking them around a little. Which seems pretty obvious when you watch teams play them. Shockingly, Clippers coach Doc Rivers disagrees with that. Via NBCLosAngeles.com.

“The officiating thing, I don’t think, is our issue. I will say that,” said Rivers about the technical fouls. “If that were the problem, then, Golden State would be struggling. They’ve been No. 2 the last two years in techs, too. I think we need to point fingers in another direction than that.”

Doc may not like it, but Speights is right.

The Warriors do complain too much, but they also have a ring so more is forgiven. The problem for the Clippers is that reputation for complaining starts with Rivers — he complains as much or more than any coach in the league. Then it filters down through Chris Paul and Blake Griffin.

Is it fair that more is forgiven with winning? Moot question. Welcome to America. The Clippers complain a lot and have yet to get past the second round with this core. And at times there standing there complaining to the referees does get in the way of them getting back into defense, and they seem to go in a funk.

Want to prove all that wrong? Win. In the playoffs.

Alivin Gentry, you worried about being fired: “I really don’t give a s— about my job status”

NEW ORLEANS, LA - OCTOBER 26:  Head coach Alvin Gentry of the New Orleans Pelicans looks on as his team plays the Denver Nuggets at the Smoothie King Center on October 26, 2016 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Denver won the game 107-102. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Sean Gardner/Getty Images)
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The Pelicans are disappointing this season — it is Anthony Davis vs. the world down there. Which is the main reason they are 7-16 this season. While things have gotten better since Jrue Holiday‘s return, Davis is averaging a league-best 31.4 points per game, it then drops off to Holiday at 15.4, and then E'Twaun Moore at 11.1.

When a team struggles, usually that is a bad sign for the coach. Not because it’s always their fault, but because GMs choose not to fire themselves for poor roster construction. Which leads to the question: Alvin Gentry, are you concerned about your job? (Warning, NSFW)

Gentry with classic coach-speak: Control what you can control.

New Orleans’ struggles are not on Gentry, certainly not completely. He’d like a roster that can play uptempo, that has depth. What he got instead was a good point guard, an elite 4/5, a rookie in Buddy Hield that maybe pans out down the line, and then… nada. And the roster Gentry has often is banged up.

If anyone is in trouble, it is GM Dell Demps. Remember, Danny Ferry was hired last summer for the vague role of “special advisor.” Gentry is in his second year, and the issue is the roster he was given. But the Pelicans are a patient organization that values continuity, so… who knows. But the clock is ticking on Davis;, it’s years away, but the Pelicans need to build a team around him and are far from that right now.