Brandon Jennings, Jermaine O'Neal

Joe Dumars told Brandon Jennings to shoot more

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Brandon Jennings shoots too much.

That’s a commonly accepted assessment of his game, to the point Jennings addressed his shot selection at his introductory news conference with the Pistons. There, Jennings pledged to shoot less. Pistons general manager Joe Dumars, sitting beside Jennings, didn’t seem to disagree with that plan.

But behind closed doors, at least according to Jennings, Dumars had a different message for his new point guard.

David Mayo of MLive:

However, in a conversation with Joe Dumars a few days ago, the Pistons’ president of basketball operations apparently told Jennings a little selfishness could be a good thing for a point guard, despite the latter’s promise to get his new teammates more involved offensively than during his shoot-first days with the Milwaukee Bucks.

“That’s one thing me and Joe talked about,” Jennings said. “That was my first problem in the beginning, when I came back — trying to please everybody, trying to make sure I was being a pass-first point guard instead of just playing basketball. But like tonight, I’ve just got to play basketball. If the shot’s there, I’m going to take it. If not, then I’m going to pass it.”

It’s difficult to make sense of Dumars’ advice, but here’s my best try:

Jennings, even with a shoot-first mentality, is a fine player. He’d probably be best in the long run if he adjusted his game to pass a little more, and these early season games are a great opportunity to experiment. But Dumars is in the final year of his contract and probably needs the Pistons to make the playoffs to keep his job. The Pistons might be better in the short term if Jennings just plays how he’s comfortable rather than working through the kinks as he expands his game.

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Whatever Dumars’ reasoning, it appears Jennings is listening.

Jennings ranks No. 27 among 30 starting point guards in passes per touch, as gathered from’s tracking data.


In itself, that doesn’t mean Jennings is playing a less-than-ideal role. But his shooting compares unfavorably to the other five starting point guards who pass on fewer than 70 percent of their touches.


Maybe Dumars should have a different conversation with Jennings.

Gilbert Arenas: Caron Butler’s version of gun incident ‘false’

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Caron Butler recently detailed the Gilbert Arenas-Javaris Crittenton gun incident.

In a since-deleted – but screenshot-captured – Instagram post, Arenas gives his description:

The biggest differences between Butler’s and Arenas’ versions:

1. Arenas claims he wasn’t the one who owed Crittenton money, that the feud escalated over Arenas prematurely showing his hand during a card game.

2. Arenas says he told Crittenton to pick a gun to shoot Arenas with – not to pick a gun he’d get shot by Arenas with.

Players’ union, NBA to set up cardiac screening for retired players

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First it was Darryl Dawkins. Then it was Moses Malone.

Two all-time great players who recently died — and at t0o young an age, 58 and 60 respectively — from undiagnosed heart conditions. Even before that, recognizing the issue the NBA players union and the league itself were setting up supplemental health coverage to provide cardiac screening for retired players, something ESPN’s Jackie MacMullan recently broke.

The joint effort between union executive director Michele Roberts and NBA commissioner Adam Silver — at a time when there still may be potentially acrimonious labor negotiations looming for their sides — is intended to ease the health concerns of its retired players.

Roberts said action from the players’ association on providing screening for its retired players is “imminent.”

“I wish I could give you an exact timetable, but we have to make sure all the components are in place,” Roberts told ESPN recently. “I will tell you we hope to have something sooner than later.”

The Cardiologists are affiliated with the NBA already, and some of the money will come from the league, while the union is both pitching in a chunk of cash and is the one organizing this, according to the report.

It’s good to Roberts and Silver working together on this. While you’d like to think this would be the kind of no-brainer move that the league and union would work together on, in the past the relationship didn’t always facilitate this sort of cooperation even on the obvious.

I’d like to think this bodes well for future labor talks, but I’m not willing to completely draw that parallel.