Kobe Bryant

NBA All-Star balloting opens with some interesting questions

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If he doesn’t come back until December, is Kobe Bryant still a starting All-Star guard in the West? Or should Stephen Curry or James Harden have that spot?

Does Kevin Love move past Tim Duncan into the starting lineup?

Is Paul George a starter in the East?

Is it time for a Derrick Rose/Kyrie Irving starting backcourt?

The NBA’s star structure is evolving and it will be interesting to see how that translates to the NBA All-Star game, specifically how fans like yourself will vote on who starts for each conference.

It’s time to think about it (yes, even just two weeks into the season) because you can vote now.

The league officially opened voting today, you can go online and vote at NBA.com/asb, or by SMS voting by texting the player’s last name to 6-9-6-2-2 (“MYNBA”), or do so when you attend an NBA game, using one of those quaint paper ballots.

Voting runs through Jan. 20.

Each conference has 60 players on the ballot and voters select the five starters in each conference. Because the list is put together before the season starts by a list of media members, guys who come out of relatively nowhere at the start of the season are not on there. Sorry Michael Carter-Williams, you still get to go to New Orleans for the rookie showcase.

The guys with the most votes from the fans get to start, then the coaches vote to select the rest of the team.

Remember, there is no “center” position anymore, you select two for the backcourt and three for the front court. That might hurt some centers, although I have a feeling Dwight Howard playing in Houston is going to do just fine (thank you international voters).

Here is a list of who made the ballot:

EAST BACKCOURT (24)

Arron Afflalo, Orlando
Ray Allen, Miami
Bradley Beal, Washington
Mario Chalmers, Miami
DeMar DeRozan, Toronto
Raymond Felton, New York
Gerald Henderson, Charlotte
George Hill, Indiana
Kyrie Irving, Cleveland
Brandon Jennings, Detroit
Joe Johnson, Brooklyn
Kyle Lowry, Toronto
O.J. Mayo, Milwaukee
Victor Oladipo, Orlando
Rajon Rondo, Boston
Derrick Rose, Chicago
J.R. Smith, New York
Lance Stephenson, Indiana
Jeff Teague, Atlanta
Evan Turner, Philadelphia
Dwyane Wade, Miami
Kemba Walker, Charlotte
John Wall, Washington
Deron Williams, Brooklyn

EAST FRONTCOURT (36)

Carmelo Anthony, New York
Carlos Boozer, Chicago
Chris Bosh, Miami
Andrew Bynum, Cleveland
Tyson Chandler, New York
Luol Deng, Chicago
Andre Drummond, Detroit
Kevin Garnett, Brooklyn
Rudy Gay, Toronto
Paul George, Indiana
Marcin Gortat, Washington
Danny Granger, Indiana
Jeff Green, Boston
Tobias Harris, Orlando
Spencer Hawes, Philadelphia
Roy Hibbert, Indiana
Al Horford, Atlanta
Ersan Ilyasova, Milwaukee
LeBron James, Miami
Al Jefferson, Charlotte
Brook Lopez, Brooklyn
Paul Millsap, Atlanta
Greg Monroe, Detroit
Nene, Washington
Joakim Noah, Chicago
Paul Pierce, Brooklyn
Larry Sanders, Milwaukee
Josh Smith, Detroit
Amar’e Stoudemire, New York
Tristan Thompson, Cleveland
Jonas Valanciunas, Toronto
Anderson Varejao, Cleveland
Nikola Vucevic, Orlando
Gerald Wallace, Boston
David West, Indiana
Thaddeus Young, Philadelphia

WEST BACKCOURT (24)

Eric Bledsoe, Phoenix
Kobe Bryant, LA Lakers
Mike Conley, Memphis
Jamal Crawford, LA Clippers
Stephen Curry, Golden State
Goran Dragic, Phoenix
Monta Ellis, Dallas
Manu Ginobili, San Antonio
Eric Gordon, New Orleans
James Harden, Houston
Jrue Holiday, New Orleans
Ty Lawson, Denver
Damian Lillard, Portland
Jeremy Lin, Houston
Kevin Martin, Minnesota
Steve Nash, LA Lakers
Tony Parker, San Antonio
Chris Paul, LA Clippers
J.J. Redick, LA Clippers
Ricky Rubio, Minnesota
Isaiah Thomas, Sacramento
Klay Thompson, Golden State
Greivis Vasquez, Sacramento
Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City

WEST FRONTCOURT (36)

LaMarcus Aldridge, Portland
Ryan Anderson, New Orleans
Omer Asik, Houston
Harrison Barnes, Golden State
Nicolas Batum, Portland
Andrew Bogut, Golden State
Wilson Chandler, Denver
DeMarcus Cousins, Sacramento
Anthony Davis, New Orleans
Tim Duncan, San Antonio
Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City
Tyreke Evans, New Orleans
Kenneth Faried, Denver
Derrick Favors, Utah
Danilo Gallinari, Denver
Marc Gasol, Memphis
Pau Gasol, LA Lakers
Blake Griffin, LA Clippers
Gordon Hayward, Utah
Dwight Howard, Houston
Serge Ibaka, Oklahoma City
Andre Iguodala, Golden State
DeAndre Jordan, LA Clippers
Enes Kanter, Utah
David Lee, Golden State
Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio
Kevin Love, Minnesota
Shawn Marion, Dallas
JaVale McGee, Denver
Markieff Morris, Phoenix
Dirk Nowitzki, Dallas
Chandler Parsons, Houston
Nikola Pekovic, Minnesota
Zach Randolph, Memphis
Tiago Splitter, San Antonio
Derrick Williams, Minnesota

Report: Rockets return Donatas Motiejunas to restricted free agency, working on new contract with him

Donatas Motiejunas, Kenneth Faried
AP Photo/David Zalubowski
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The Rockets had Donatas Motiejunas in a bind.

He was beholden to them on a four-year, $31 million deal and unable to sign with other teams. Motiejunas’ choices: Report for a physical or wait in limbo.

But apparently Houston has allowed him out of that constraint.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

This means Motiejunas can’t sign with the Nets, who signed him to the original offer sheet, for one year.

I bet it also means Motiejunas and Houston have agreed to a new contract. Otherwise, why release him from the offer sheet? The Rockets would be giving up a tremendous amount of leverage out of the goodness of their hearts – unless this is just a prelude to a new deal with Houston.

John Wall pushes down Jusuf Nurkic from behind in retaliation (video)

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John Wall didn’t like how Jusuf Nurkic bumped him, so Wall shoved the Nuggets center from behind and sent him to the floor.

An overreaction to the bump? Probably. Wall got hit with a technical foul.

But I’m mostly just impressed Wall was strong enough to push over Nurkic.

DeMar DeRozan throws down massive dunk against Timberwolves (VIDEO)

derozan
AP
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DeMar DeRozan is having one of those seasons for the No. 2 team in the Eastern Conference, the Toronto Raptors. During Thursday night’s win over the Minnesota Timberwolves, 124-110, DeRozan scored 27 points while adding eight rebounds, five assists, and shooting a whopping 13 free throws.

DeRozan also sealed the victory in the final minute with a huge put back dunk.

The Raptors led by 9 points with a minute left as they were inbounding the ball. A long pass from the baseline to a streaking DeMarre Carroll resulted in a blocked layup, but DeRozan was there to clean up the mess.

Via CJZero on Twitter:

Three things we learned Thursday: Memphis, Marc Gasol just win every close game

Memphis Grizzlies center Marc Gasol (33) shoots between Portland Trail Blazers forward Al-Farouq Aminu, from left, center Mason Plumlee, and forward Jake Layman (10) in the second half of an NBA basketball game Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016, in Memphis, Tenn. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill)
Associated Press
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Here’s what you missed Thursday around the NBA while you were drinking homemade glow-in-the-dark beer with jellyfish genes in it (no, you try it first, I insist)…

1) Don’t play Memphis in a close game, they just find a way to win.
Last week, when Mike Conley went down with a back injury and was going to miss six weeks (give or take), we questioned if Memphis could keep their heads above water. They promptly went out and lost to a very good Toronto team.

Since then they have won five in a row, capped by an impressive 88-86 win over Portland Tuesday. Impressive because:

• Memphis is now 12-0 in games that were within 3 points in the final minute. You get in a close game with Memphis, you lose. (Statistically, we know some of that is luck, that there will be some regression to the mean, but that stat has propelled a team has been outscored by nine points this season, one that should be 12-12, to the 16-8 record they have.)

• Memphis trailed Portland 79-68 with less than five minutes to go, and still won.

Marc Gasol had 36 points and has been an absolute beast since Conley went down, doing whatever it takes to win.

• Toney Douglas — a guy the Grizzlies just picked up off the street this week, basically — comes in and is clutch down the stretch for them, including hitting the game-winning free throws with 0.5 seconds left (Damian Lillard tried to argue the call, to no avail).

The schedule gets tough for Memphis the next couple of weeks — Golden State, home-and-home with Cleveland, then Boston and Utah looming not long after — but do not doubt the Grizzlies. No team is as resilient as this bunch.

2) Bulls prove Spurs aren’t perfect on the road. It was bound to happen, the San Antonio Spurs were 13-0 on the road, they were going to stumble at some point. That point turned out to be Thursday night in Chicago, where the Spurs came out of the gate like they went out and had a big pregame meal of Lou Malnati’s pizza — 32 points on 30.6 percent shooting in the first half for San Antonio. The Spurs didn’t defend poorly, for example Kawhi Leonard held Jimmy Butler to no first-half points — in fact, midway through the first quarter Taj Gibson and Robin Lopez had scored almost all the Bulls’ buckets — but the San Antonio offense was dreadful. Throw a little credit to the Chicago defense if you want, but this was more San Antonio stumbling than a Chicago return to the Thibodeau era.

The Bulls were up 12 at the half and were able to hang on despite a strong second 24 minutes from Leonard (17 of his 24 came in the second half) and get the win. Dwyane Wade had 20 points and hit a couple of key buckets late to stabilize Chicago. For a Bulls team that is going to be in a playoff battle all season — they are the seven seed right now, one game ahead of the Pacers in ninth — these kinds of wins at home can prove huge.

3) What is it with Minnesota and second half? On the road, the Minnesota Timberwolves had played the Toronto Raptors even for the first 24 minutes — it was 59-59 at the half. And yet, there was a sense of dread for Timberwolves fans because all season their young team has just come apart in the third quarter — and then Toronto opened the second half on an 11-2 run. Minnesota, to their credit, crawls back into it, but midway through the fourth the Raptors go on a 17-4 run sparked by Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan, and the Raptors pull away for the 124-110 win. The Timberwolves lost another game because they can’t defend well.

Minnesota shows flashes of the kind of brilliance that has everyone thinking they might be a contender in a few years. But we all expected too much too soon from this group. Those impressive stretches are followed by ones where they play like a young team, they don’t defend well, and they throw those good efforts away. Not that they were going to beat a good Toronto team on the road, but the Timberwolves can be frustrating to watch. Patience is hard, and Minnesota fans are being asked to show a lot of it. We can debate if it’s time to bring Ricky Rubio off the bench and let Kris Dunn sink or swim, but that’s not the core problem. Ultimately, the Timberwolves are young and playing like it. They don’t know how and aren’t putting in the effort to defend well yet. Karl-Anthony Towns, Andrew Wiggins, Zach LaVine, they can be the core of a contender eventually, but there is a lot of learning to do along the way. Tom Thibodeau can teach them. But it’s going to require patience.