Roy Hibbert, Andre Drummond

Roy Hibbert doesn’t like Andre Drummond anymore


Roy Hibbert has been an All-Star. He’d probably be a U.S. Olympian if he were allowed to be. He’s one of the top players on one of the NBA’s top teams.

He’s what Andre Drummond wanted to be.

So how does Drummond go about rising to that stature?

Well, he worked on his conditioning so he could play more (37 minutes per game this season). He’s getting more comfortable with the ball in his hands. He’s defending more aggressively and more soundly within a team concept.

In time, Drummond will get there, it seems.

Until then, Drummond is doing everything possible to bridge the gap, perhaps learning from the Pistons’ two biggest offseason acquisitions.

The Pistons made Josh Smith their most highly paid player and Brandon Jennings their point guard, putting two players known to play with an edge into leadership positions. If the Pistons-Pacers game Tuesday is any indication, their influence is rubbing off on Drummond.

Pacers Center Roy Hibbert, via Terry Foster of The Detroit News:

“To tell you the truth I was a fan of his until tonight,” Hibbert said Tuesday. “He is a real good prospect, but it seemed like he was running his mouth a little bit tonight. He has a tremendous future, but I was a fan of his. I thought he was supposed to have a breakout year this year. Best of luck to him. He can dunk the ball real well and he can block shots and he can rebound. He is going to have a bright future — but I was a fan of his.”

Hibbert doesn’t like yapping on the court. Drummond knows that and admits to trying to agitate him. It was nothing personal. He was simply doing his job and does not care that his fan club lost a member.

“If I lost a fan, I can’t be mad about it,” Drummond said. “If he complained about me talking, that is part of the game. I’m doing what I can do to get in his head, and it obviously worked because he noticed. So I was just trying to play my game and get into his.”

By saying he doesn’t like Drummond, Hibbert is letting Drummond win – at least to some degree. Hibbert outplayed Drummond in that game, a Pacers win, but maybe the gap between the two would have been wider had Drummond not spoken up.

Knowing he bothered Hibbert will only keep Drummond on this track. Foster:

“My goal was to not make it easy for him,” Drummond said. “It was to make it harder to get his shots, like it will throughout the season. The jump hook I tried to bang him to get him off his spot — that is what we worked on in practice. If he is mad about that, then he needs to get used to it.”

The Pistons and Pacers next play Dec. 16. I wouldn’t be surprised if Drummond has lost a few more fans on opposing teams – and gained more in Detroit – by then. He seems set on defending physically and verbally, a combination that should make the Pistons better, though less liked.

Mark Cuban suggests supplemental draft for undrafted free agents

Mark Cuban
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A lot of people around the NBA have ideas to improve the draft, free agency and the D-League, and Mavericks owner Mark Cuban has never been shy about sharing his. His latest idea seems pretty logical: a supplemental draft for undrafted free agents.

Via Hoops Rumors:

“I would have a supplemental draft every summer for undrafted free agents of the current and previous 3 years,” Cuban wrote in an email to Hoops Rumors. “If you are more than 3 years out you are not eligible and just a free agent.”

The supplemental draft would have two rounds, and teams would hold the rights to the players they select for two years, Cuban added. Players can opt out and choose not to make themselves eligible, but those who get picked would receive fully guaranteed minimum-salary contracts when they sign, according to Cuban’s proposal.

“That would make it fun a few weeks after the draft and pre-summer league,” Cuban wrote. “It would prevent some of the insanity that goes on to build summer league rosters.”

It’s an interesting proposition. Most undrafted players who sign during the summer don’t get guaranteed contracts, so when deciding to enter this supplemental draft, they would have to weigh the value of having guaranteed money versus getting to decide where they sign. It’s unlikely that anything like this could happen anytime soon, because of all the hoops to jump through to get the league and the players’ union to sign off on it, but it’s a worthwhile idea that deserves some consideration in the next CBA negotiations.