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Study finds growing up in wealthier neighborhoods increases chances of making NBA

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The narrative is a strong one and something linked to the NBA today through guys like Derrick Rose — he grew up in a poor area of Chicago where basketball was his escape from the troubles around him. The game eventually provided him an escape from the neighborhood. LeBron James has a similar tale, a poor family and a single mother who used basketball to escape that life.

There is a sense among fans (and even some in the league) that most NBA players have a similar story, that a drive to get them out of tough circumstances pushed them to the long hours on the court needed to hone their skills and make the league.

Except that’s not really true.

In a fascinating piece in Sunday’s New York Times, Seth Stephens-Davidowitz went though tons of data on NBA players and where they were born and raised, comparing it to the overall populations where they were born, and what he found was that having a little bit of money in the family increased a child’s chances of making the league.

The results? Growing up in a wealthier neighborhood is a major, positive predictor of reaching the N.B.A. for both black and white men. Is this driven by sons of N.B.A. players like the Warriors’ brilliant Stephen Curry? Nope. Take them out and the result is similar….

But this tells us only where N.B.A. players began life. Can we learn more about their individual backgrounds? In the 1980s, when the majority of current N.B.A. players were born, about 25 percent of African-Americans were born to mothers under age 20; 60 percent were born to unwed mothers. I did an exhaustive search for information on the parents of the 100 top-scoring black players born in the 1980s, relying on news stories, social networks and public records. Putting all the information together, my best guess is that black N.B.A. players are about 30 percent less likely than the average black male to be born to an unmarried mother and a teenage mother.

Why? There is one obvious reason: Proper nutrition at a young age has been show to lead to increased height, something confirmed in multiple studies. Families with the money to properly feed their children healthy foods get taller kids, and height helps in basketball.

More than that studies also have shown children from better off families tend to do better at developing, as the story puts it, “skills like persistence, self-regulation and trust.” Again things that help one reach the level of professional in a sport. There are other factors in here as well; you really need to go read the entire article to see the argument fleshed out.

Obviously, there are stories all over the bell curve on this. There are guys like former NBA player Derek Anderson who was homeless and on his own at 14 but had the drive to make the NBA. There are wealthier youth who may have the physical skills but not the drive to hone them.

Still, it’s an interesting idea that our preconceived notions of the average NBA player often miss the mark like a Michael Kidd-Gillchrist jumper. Having some money helps people on the path, as it so often does.

Watch LeBron James’ 23 points during Game 5 win over Toronto

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A good rule of thumb: If LeBron James is getting few breakaway dunks, the other team is in trouble.

Enter the Toronto Raptors, who got to watch a dunking clinic by LeBron as he had multiple breakaways during the Cavaliers’ 38-point win on Wednesday night. LeBron played well, and the Cavaliers got a balanced attack from their stars — 25 points from Kevin Love, 23 each from LeBron and Kyrie Irving.

Watch LeBron’s night above. Toronto needs to find a way to keep him from having another game like this Friday.

Kyle Lowry’s face when he sees Game 5 box score sums up Raptors’ night

CLEVELAND, OH - MAY 25: Kyle Lowry #7 of the Toronto Raptors looks on in the second half against the Cleveland Cavaliers in game five of the Eastern Conference Finals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Quicken Loans Arena on May 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
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After a beatdown at the hands of the Cleveland Cavaliers in Game 5 — a loss where he was just 5-of-12 shooting, a loss that has the Raptors on the brink of playoff elimination — Kyle Lowry did what he had to do and went in front of the media to answer questions and try to explain that loss.

But really, his face when he walked into the interview room and saw the box score summed up the Raptors night perfectly.

When you get your report card and you have to explain to your parents why you failed all of your classes.

A video posted by Sports Videos (@houseofhighlights) on

Lowry and the Raptors need to turn it around and win at home Friday night to keep their playoff dream alive another day.

Heat players past, present throw support behind David Fizdale heading to Memphis

David Fizdale
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The Memphis Grizzlies have found their man — Miami Heat assistant coach David Fizdale has been offered the head coaching job in Memphis. He’s a smart coach who earned the trust of elite players and was a key part of the staff that helped Miami to a couple of rings.

It’s a good hire. Don’t just take my word for it, check out what a couple Heat players from that era had to say.

Mario Chalmers had a first-hand view — he was traded from Miami to Memphis in the middle of last season. The point guard who went the other way in that deal, Beno Udrih, also helped push the deal along.

Fizdale is going to be a popular hire with the players. That said, if the Grizzlies can’t keep Mike Conley in free agency the team is going to have struggles this season, regardless of who coaches them.

Watch Kevin Love drop 25 points on Toronto

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Before Game 5, Cavaliers’ coach Tyronn Lue told Kevin Love just to stay aggressive. Channing Frye told him the same thing.

Love took that advice to heart. From the opening tip of Game 5, Love was attacking — backing down the overmatched Luis Scola and knocking down threes. Love had 12 points in the first quarter on his way to a game-high 25, helping spark an easy, 38-point Cavaliers win in Game 5.

Now, can Love do this on the road in Game 6?