PBT Roundtable: Who is the most overrated team in the NBA to start season?

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Each week the PBT writers sit at a virtual roundtable, just like the knights of King Arthur, drink mead and discuss the NBA topic of the day. This week’s question:

Kurt Helin: There are a few candidates here, but after seeing them in person opening night I will say the Clippers (and I picked them to come out of the West this season). Yes, the Lakers loss was one flukey night, yes they picked up a win in Game 2 and Chris Paul looked great, but there are some real issues to fix over the next 80 games. Some those seemed tied to Blake Griffin — Doc Rivers praised DeAndre Jordan and called out Griffin about defense after the first game (as he did his guards, who were atrocious, particularly Darren Collison). For me it has always come back to the Clippers defense, and that’s going to be more of a project for Doc Rivers than maybe we anticipated — in both games so far they have given up 109 points per 100 possessions. Small sample size, but watch them defend and Rivers has a lot of work to do.

Dan Feldman: The Knicks, always the Knicks. My only reservation about picking the Knicks is I still don’t understand how they were so good last season, so it’s tough to be so sure they’ll regress this season. The Clippers, a team I also picked to win the West, are a fine choice, too. I don’t want to overreact to one game, but that’s all we have right now. They certainly underwhelmed against the Lakers.

DJ Foster: The Cleveland Cavaliers. This roster looks great on paper, doesn’t it? Kyrie Irving, Anderson Varejao and Andrew Bynum? Woo boy, that’s some Popovich brand nasty right there. Unfortunately, the injury histories of each of those players are, well, the other kind of nasty. It would be shocking if the Cavs stay at full strength for long, but even if they do, I still have my reservations about the wing play on both ends. Teams are going to sit in the paint, collapse on Irving, and beg someone else to beat them. I don’t know that anyone else can.

Rhett Anderson: I’ll go with the Nets. Made headlines in the offseason picking up KG, Pierce, and the Jet, but I don’t think Brooklyn’s substance deserves the level of attention they’ve been getting. Of course it’s still too early — however, judging by the offseason and by what they’re bringing back, Garnett’s and Pierce’s age mean that Deron Williams and Brook Lopez will have to shoulder most of the load to make a deep playoff run. I wrote they’re longshots to challenge the Heat in the East, and I believe that is still the case, but in the end I feel it’s just a little too much attention for expected future results.

Brett Pollakoff: After opening night, it would certainly be easy to go with the Clippers, and it would be especially easy for me considering I was the conductor of the “Eric Bledsoe is overrated” train last season. But I’m going with the Thunder, whose third threat has gone from James Harden to Kevin Martin to … Reggie Jackson? And people have this team making the Finals? It’s possible that Kevin Durant turns in a monster of an MVP-caliber season to make that happen, but given the uncertainty surrounding Russell Westbrook’s return from injury and the rest of that roster, I just don’t see it.

PBT Extra: What does Kyrie Irving trade mean for LeBron James?

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In the end, the entire Kyrie Irving blockbuster trade was about LeBron James. It started because Kyrie Irving wanted out of LeBron’s enormous shadow. Cleveland went with this trade because Isaiah Thomas and Jae Crowder help them win now, and whatever LeBron decides to do next summer the Brooklyn pick (and maybe Ante Zizic) helps them build for the future.

But what does this trade mean to LeBron James?

Honestly, it doesn’t change much. That’s what I get into in this latest PBT Extra. LeBron is leaving his options open, but maybe this deal could help Cleveland keep him if it makes them more competitive with the Warriors.

Rumor: Young Bulls ‘can’t stand’ Dwyane Wade

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After a loss last January, Dwyane Wade (in conjunction with since-traded Jimmy Butler) lashed out at his Bulls teammates for not caring enough. Those younger players didn’t receive the message gratefully, questioning why Wade didn’t practice more.

The simple answer: Wade is 35, and he and his team are better served if he saves himself for games. But Wade also should have known his schedule left him ill-suited to criticize harder-working teammates.

The whole saga exposed the inherent tension that occurs when an accomplished veteran with declining skills is thrust into a leadership position on a mediocre team.

Consider that backdrop as Wade and Chicago dance around a buyout.

Nick Friedell on ESPN discussing Wade getting bought out:

This is inevitable. It’s coming. It’s a matter of when, not if.

But right now, guys, it’s just kind of a staring contest. Everybody’s looking at each other saying, “OK, how much money are you willing to give up?”

And Gar Forman, the Bulls’ GM, at summer league, said, “Oh, we’re not having conversations.” I don’t think that’s the case. I think Dwyane’s agents and the Bulls are wanting to get this thing done.

But I’d really be surprised if it happened before the season. I still think it’s more likely that it’ll happen probably somewhere in December or January.

But this is a divorce that’s going to happen. It’s just going to take some time.

The young players on the Bulls really can’t stand Dwyane, and it’s the little secret in Chicago. They have had enough.

Wade’s January criticism was reportedly particularly directed at Nikola Mirotic and Michael Carter-Williams, neither of whom are on the roster. (Mirotic, a restricted free agent, will likely return.) Even if Wade’s comments cast a wider net, Jerian Grant, Paul Zipser, Denzel Valentine, Bobby Portis and Cristiano Felicio are the only young players still on the team from that time. None of those players deserve much influence in how the franchise operates.

Still, no matter what the young players want, it’s clear Wade no longer fits on a rebuilding Chicago. They might get their wish.

Wade is set to earn $23.8 million in the final season of an expiring contract. That salary could prove useful in a bigger trade.

If bought out, Wade would count as dead money against Chicago’s cap at his buyout amount. They Bulls should obviously be amenable if he sacrifices enough, but a small discount doesn’t justify locking into that money rather than having a trade chip available.

If Chicago is deep into the cellar as expected after the trade deadline, a buyout would be completely logical then. Maybe the Bulls even assess the trade market sooner and conclude Wade’s huge expiring contract won’t facilitate a trade.

It’s easy to see a buyout happening eventually. In the meantime, Wade and his younger teammates will just have to get along. I trust Wade’s professionalism to make this situation at least tenable, but Fred Hoiberg might have his hands full building cooperation with all the people involved.

Spurs sign undrafted former Virginia guard London Perrantes

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SAN ANTONIO (AP) The San Antonio Spurs have signed guard London Perrantes.

Michael Scott of Basketball Insiders:

The 22-year-old Perrantes wasn’t drafted out of Virginia this year but made summer league appearances for the Miami Heat in Las Vegas and Orlando.

The 6-foot-2 guard averaged 10 points, 5 assists, 2 rebounds and 1.5 steals in the MGM Resorts Summer League. He averaged 11.3 points, 4.8 assists, 3.8 rebounds and 1.3 steals in Orlando summer league action.

Perrantes set school career records at Virginia with 138 games and 4,425 minutes. He averaged 12.7 points, 3.8 assists and 3 rebounds during his senior season. He made 40.9 percent of his career 3-point attempts (211 of 516).

 

Danny Ainge: Isaiah Thomas’ hip played ‘some’ role in Kyrie Irving trade

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The Celtics gave up so much for Kyrie Irving, questions immediately emerged about the assets traded to Cleveland:

Are we all underrating the Nets, whose 2018 first-round pick Boston sent to Cleveland? Were Isaiah Thomas and Jae Crowder just products of Brad Stevens’ system? And is Thomas damaged goods?

Thomas will enter free agency next summer as a 29-year-old 5-foot-9 point guard seeking a max contract. That’s undoubtedly a concern.

But Cleveland is in win-now mode, as LeBron James can opt out of his contract next summer. As long Thomas maintains his star production between now and then, even if his next contract presents complications, the Cavaliers should be happy.

But a hip injury leaves uncertainty into how Thomas finishes this contract.

A. Sherrod Blakely of CSN New England:

Ainge, via Blakely:

“There’s probably a little bit of delay for Isaiah to start this year,” Ainge said in a conference call with reporters following the trade becoming official Tuesday night.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

The Cavs are building for June, not October. A short delay in Thomas’ return is no big deal – as long as he fully recovers and isn’t at greater risk of future injury.

Those are big assumptions for someone in his position. His physical will be huge.