Allen Iverson

Allen Iverson: “I’m formally announcing my retirement from basketball”


Few players have had the impact on the players of today that Allen Iverson did — everyone wanted his look, everyone wanted to emulate his fearless, attacking style.

His career ended in a bit of an awkward way, with fits and starts, but on Wednesday he made the end official.

“I’m formally announcing my retirement from basketball,” Iverson said in a press conference broadcast on Comcast Sportsnet Philly (and streamed live on “You know, I thought one this day came it would be basically a tragic day. I never imagined the day coming, but I knew it would come. I feel proud and happy to say that I’m happy with my decision and I feel great….

“It’s just a hard life to live. It’s a great one, I wouldn’t trade it for nothing. I have no regrets on anything. People ask me all the time, ‘Do I have any regrets?’ I don’t have any. If I could back and do it all over, would I change anything? No. Obviously if I could go back and change anything I would be a perfect man. And I know there’s no perfect man and there’s no perfect basketball player. So no, I wouldn’t change anything. My career was up and down at times. I made a lot of mistakes, a lot of things I’m not proud of. But it’s only from other people to learn from.”

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Iverson was reflective and grateful in the 10-minute talk, thanking Michael Jordan and Larry Brown for being key parts of his professional career. He also talked about Georgetown.

“I always believed in myself, my mom always told me I could be anything that I wanted to be,” Iverson said. “I truly actually believed it. I fought. I went through a whole lot, trying to get to this point right here. [Former Georgetown] Coach [John] Thompson gave me an opportunity when nobody in the world would and believed in me. Basically saved my life and helped my dream come true.”

He showed off his sense of humor.

“You used to think the suspect was the guy with the corn rows, now you see the police officers with the corn row,” he said.

We’ve known this was coming for a while — frankly a lot of his fans seemed to know the end was there before Iverson himself did.

However that shouldn’t alter our opinion of a future first-ballot Hall of Famer — an 11-time All-Star who averaged 26.7 points, 6.2 assists and 2.2 steals a game in his 13-year career. His game had a lot of substance but you can’t think of Iverson without the style — the tattoos (before everybody had them), the cornrows, his fearless attacking style and ability to finish over guys a foot taller than him. That style made him one of the most entertaining players of his generation. He led the charge to bring a hip-hop culture to the game and young African-Americans in particular related to him in a way they did not with other stars.

He changed the game. He should be celebrated and will be tonight in Philadelphia as the Sixers tip off their season.

Report: Hawks co-owner made more money by exposing Danny Ferry’s Luol Deng comments

Michael Gearon, Bruce Levenson
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A terribly kept secret: Hawks co-owner Michael Gearon Jr. wanted to get rid of general manager Danny Ferry.

Many believe that’s why Gearon made such a big deal about Ferry’s pejorative “African” comment about Luol Deng – that Gearon was more concerned about ousting Ferry than showing real concern over racism.

Gearon had another, no less sinister, reason to raise concern over Ferry’s remarks.

Kevin Arnovitz and Brian Windhorst of ESPN:

While Gearon felt that Ferry, as he wrote in the June 2014 email to Levenson, “put the entire franchise in jeopardy,” Gearon also figured to benefit financially from a Sterling-esque fallout.

In the spring of 2014, Gearon was in the process of selling more of his interest in the team to Levenson and the partners he had sold to in September. The agreed-upon price for roughly a third of Gearon’s remaining shares valued the Hawks at approximately $450 million, according to reports from sources.

“We accept your offer to buy the remaining 31 million,” Gearon wrote in an email to Levenson on April 17, 2014. “Let me know next steps so we can keep this simple as you suggested without a bunch of lawyers and bankers.”

Approximately five weeks later — just a little more than a week before the fateful conference call — Steve Ballmer agreed to pay $2 billion for the Clippers, a record-smashing price that completely changed the assessed value of NBA franchises. Gearon firmly maintains he was acting out of the sincerity of his convictions to safeguard the franchise from the Sterling stench, but such a spectacle also allowed him to wiggle out of selling his shares at far below market value.

Gearon and his legal team later challenged the notion that the sell-down was bound by any sort of contractual obligation and that any papers were signed. Once the organization became involved in the investigation, the sale of the shares was postponed.

Arnovitz and Windhorst did an incredible amount of reporting here. I suggest you read the full piece, which includes much more background on the Gearon-Ferry rift.

Considering the Hawks sold for $850 million, Gearon definitely made more money than if he’d sold his shares at a $450 million valuation.

Did that motivate him? Probably, though it doesn’t have to be one or the other. Most likely, his actions were derived from at least three desires – making more money, ousting Ferry and combating racism. Parsing how much each contributed is much more difficult.

What Ferry said was racist, whether or not he was looking at more racism on the sheet of paper in front of him. His comments deserved punishment.

But if Gearon didn’t have incentive to use them for his own benefit, would we even know about them? How many other teams, with more functional front offices, would have kept similar remarks under wraps or just ignored them?

PBT Extra bold prediction previews: Clippers ready to win West?

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With our PBT Extra videos, we are previewing the entire NBA by using bold predictions, starting in the Pacific Division (we already did the Warriors).

Some of those predictions come from fans on Twitter where I had sent out a request, including the bold prediction for the Clippers.

It could happen, they are certainly contenders. But two things need to happen.

The big one is their defense, which was middle of the pack last season, needs to move into the top 10 (and DeAndre Jordan needs to play consistently like a guy who is third in Defensive Player of the Year voting).

Second is the new and improved bench unit of Lance Stephenson, Josh Smith, and Jamal Crawford (he’s not new) need to mesh into a unit. Those are three guys who like to create for themselves and make questionable shot choices, getting them play well with others could be a bumpy road.