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GMs other main job: manage expectations of ownership


There’s a younger generation of NBA owners coming into place, ones who used statistical metrics to help them succeed in business and believe that can be applied to the NBA. These young guns are demanding something more strongly than ever from their front offices:


Not just wins, or not just to make money (it used to be one or the other), they expect both. That may not sound radically different but it is. Owners are not pulling the old Donald Sterling or Chris Cohen anymore — the Los Angeles Clippers and Golden State Warriors struggled for years on the court but the owners didn’t care because the teams turned a profit while their value continued to go up.

Those days have gone the way of the dodo, something Ric Bucher details in a post for Bleacher Report.

Once upon a time, back when the majority of owners had franchises whose value already had trebled their original purchase price, team executives were under far less scrutiny—and the demand for immediate and constant results simply wasn’t the same. Making the playoffs, by and large, assured continued employment and, more often than not, served as grounds for a contract extension or raise.

Those days are gone. The combination of seeing a host of 50-plus-win coaches get the axe (Lionel Hollins, Vinny Del Negro, George Karl) and new faces taking charge of basketball operations for nearly one-third of the league has many executives less worried about the formula for success than the formula for survival.

“The rhetoric from the owners about their expectations is at an all-time obscene level,” said one former executive who remains plugged in with his former colleagues.

Franchise values continue to go up, but new school owners like Robert Pera in Memphis or Joshua Harris in Philly expect things to be done their way — and they expect numbers that can back that up. They want wins and dollar signs and they will push to make both happen — and in the Harris/Philly case, they are willing to step back to get the big wins if that’s what it takes. The GMs getting spots around the league now are guys who can provide the metrics to help get both, or at least can sell they are. They can manage the expectations.

Welcome to the new NBA.

C.J. McCollum ejected for flagrantly fouling Gordon Hayward (video)

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I’m not sure C.J. McCollum meant to grab Gordon Hayward‘s neck. The 6-foot-8 Hayward elevated, and the 6-foot-4 McCollum just might not have been able to get high enough to make a play on the ball.

But McCollum did grab Hayward’s neck.

It was a dangerous and unnecessary play, especially in the preseason.

Report: Mavericks may be team interested in Larry Sanders

Larry Sanders
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The Dallas Mavericks are looking for a center— desperately at times, they brought JaVale McGee into training camp to get a look. They will start Zaza Pachulia and behind him it’s probably Samuel Dalembert once he gets healthy.

Which is why Dallas may be the team interested in Larry Sanders — Mark Cuban is a guy known for giving second chances in the league. But there have been no talks, yet, reports Tim MacMahon at ESPN.

Larry Sanders has been out of the game since his buyout last February trying to deal with his personal demons and may well not be ready to return. He may never return.

His couple seasons with the Bucks were filled with drama and issues. There was the nightclub brawl left him with an injured thumb in need of a surgery. There were the charges of animal cruelty. There was a five-game drug suspension. There was missed time for personal reasons. There was the 10-game suspension for marijuana use (he failed at least four tests to get there) — then that suspension was extended past the 10 games. In the end, he agreed to a buyout to get space away from the game to deal with his personal issues.

He may or may not be ready to return from that. He may or may not ever be ready. But if he decides to give it a try, NBA teams will be waiting. Maybe Dallas.