Tristan Thompson

Tristan Thompson talks switch from left to right-handed shooter


Through two preseason games, Tristan Thompson is 11-of-18 shooting for the Cleveland Cavaliers. That’s 61.1 percent for those of you scoring at home. It’s just two preseason games, be careful reading too much into it, but maybe it portends a big jump from last season when he shot 48.8 percent from the field.

This isn’t the normal jump you see as a player enters his third season — Thompson decided to switch shooting hands this summer. From when he first started playing basketball at age 12 until last season he’s been a lefty. This season, he’s a righty.

We’ve been following the progress of this unprecedented, wild transition and the signs continue to be positive.

Thompson sat down with Lee Jenkins of Sports Illustrated for a fantastic profile and talked about the genesis of the switch.

After a morning shootaround in Phoenix last November, while players iced ankles in the courtside seats at US Airways Center, reserve guard Jeremy Pargo challenged Thompson to a shooting contest with their off hands. Thompson won so easily that Pargo told him afterward, “You should do this all the time. You look better. You look more natural. You’ll always be a solid player, but you could be an All-Star.” Thompson flashed back to those tens of thousands of jumpers. “But I’m lefthanded,” he protested. “I got here lefthanded, and I’m going to make it work lefthanded.”

However the more he thought about it, the more he thought the change was a good idea.

“A lot of people stick with what they know because they’re insecure about putting something new out there and getting embarrassed,” Thompson says. “I don’t want to sit here in 12 years and think, What if I made that change? Could I have been one of the best power forwards in the league? Could our team have taken a leap?” He thought about James, who dropped into the low post two years ago and emerged with consecutive championships. The immortals step out of their comfort zone in order to expand it. “They aren’t afraid to put it on the line,” Thompson says.

Good signs in the preseason are nice but border on meaningless — what will he do against the better regular season defenders he will face?

Thompson is a power forward and the Cavaliers used their No. 1 draft pick last June on another power forward, Anthony Bennett. This season Cleveland can easily keep both but coming soon when Thompson can test restricted free agency the Cavaliers are going to have some long-term decisions to make.

If he keeps this up, Thompson is going to make it a tough call for the Cavaliers.

Hornets’ Al Jefferson out 2-3 weeks with strained calf

Al Jefferson
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The Hornets have been playing well of late, going 7-3 in their last 10 and outscoring opponents by 6.3 points per 100 possessions. They are solidly in the playoff picture out East, in the six slot right now.

This is not going to help matters.

The team announced that an MRI confirmed center Al Jefferson will be out two to three weeks with a strained left calf muscle, suffered during Charlotte’s 87-82 win over Milwaukee on Sunday.

Jefferson missing a few weeks due to injury at some point during the season is an annual event, like the Rose Parade or the Head of the Charles Regatta — but this year the Hornets are better prepared to deal with it. This is the deepest Charlotte team in recent memory.

Tyler Hansbrough, Cody Zeller, and Frank Kaminsky will get more run — plus Spencer Hawes may be back in the rotation — and if they can step up the Hornets will not slow down much.

This season the Hornets defense has been downright stingy when Jefferson is on the bench, giving up 94.2 points per 100 possessions (which is 10 better than when he is on the court). However, the Hornet offense and rebounding efforts are stronger when he plays.

PBT Extra: How did Thunder, Pacers move up in PBT Power Rankings?

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As they do every Monday during the season, the PBT Power Rankings came out and while the top three remained the same there were some climbers.

Specifically, the Thunder at No. 4 and the Pacers at No. 5.

Why they are there is the latest PBT Extra topic with Jenna Corrado. The simple answer is they are both excellent teams. Russell Westbrook, Kevin Durant, and Paul George are all playing like Top 10 players.

PBT Podcast: We’re back talking Kobe, 76ers, Warriors, Pistons, more

Kobe Bryant
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The ProBasketballTalk NBA podcast is back.

Sure we’re a month into the season, but we’re going to get this podcast rolling again and you can expect us on each Monday and Thursday, with a variety of guests talking everything around the NBA.

Today NBC’s own Dan Feldman joins Kurt Helin to talk Kobe Bryant‘s retirement announcement, and what that means both for the Lakers going forward this season and beyond, but also what that could mean for Byron Scott’s future as the Lakers’ coach.

We also delve into the “showdown” between the Lakers and Sixers on Thursday, talk about the job Brett Brown is doing there as coach (a good one), we talk some Warriors, some Draymond Green, Pistons, Spurs and Pacers to round it all out.

Listen to the podcast below or you can listen and subscribe via iTunes.


Sacramento’s DeMarcus Cousins probable to play against Dallas Monday

DeMarcus Cousins
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It’s this simple: The Sacramento Kings are 5-5 when DeMarcus Cousins plays this season, 1-7 when he sits. (And that win number is a big misleading, they looked like they would have beaten Charlotte with him, but when he left with back pain they lost, they could easily be 6-4 with him.)

So it’s good news that Cousins is expected to return to the Sacramento lineup Monday night. Well not good for Rick Carlisle and the Mavericks, but good for the Kings, as reported by James Ham at CSNBayArea,com.

This season Cousins is averaging 27.9 points and 11.2 rebounds a game, he has a true shooting percentage above the league average (56.3 percent for Cousins) and he has a PER of 27.1 which is sixth best in the league.

Combine him with the numbers Rajon Rondo has put up lately the Kings become much more dangerous. They’d be even scarier if everyone stayed healthy and George Karl would settle on a lineup.