John Wall, Ted Leonsis

Wizards owner says he won’t allow players to use injuries as an excuse


The Wizards have suffered far more than their fair share of injuries recently, making it difficult to climb out of the five-year funk that has let the team out of the postseason picture.

This year is no exception, with Emeka Okafor and Chris Singleton already sidelined. But they aren’s exactly John Wall and Nene, who each missed significant time last season.

Wizards owner Ted Leonsis expects to see improvement this year, and is placing pressure on his players to produce results. While injuries have been a very real issue for the team to deal with, Leonsis says that he no longer wants to hear that as an excuse.

From J. Michael of CSN Washington:

“We have 13 healthy players and the one thing I’m not allowing anybody to do is use injuries as an excuse,” Leonsis said at a news conference. “We have 15 players under contract. Two can’t start the season. That means we have 13. That’s all you can dress anyway.

“Last year, there was a pass given. We didn’t have Nene and John Wall, our two best players. Understandable.” …

“We’ve retained our players. We’ve added a lot of players. We’ve spent a lot of money. And I expect us to be a playoff-caliber team. …That’s the pressure I’ve placed on the organization.”

Had I been at this press conference, I would have asked Leonsis a follow-up to his “no using injuries as an excuse” statement, and it would have gone something like this: What does that even mean?

If guys are legitimately injured, that’s not an excuse. It’s an actual reason that they are unable to play. You can’t possibly live up to expectations if your best players are constantly missing time due to injury — just ask last year’s Lakers about that.

Things should indeed be improved in D.C. this year, and the team has an outside shot of making the playoffs if all the right pieces fall into place. But injuries would derail that dream rather quickly, and Leonsis more than most should be aware of that unfortunate possibility.

NBA All-Star, champion Bill Bridges dies at age 76

ATLANTA - 1968:  Bill Bridges#10 of the Atlanta Hawks poses for a portrait circa 1968 in Atlanta, Georgia. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 1968 NBAE (Photo by NBA Photo Library/NBAE via Getty Images)
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Bill Bridges, a star as a Kansas Jayhawk who went on to have a 12-year NBA career that included being part of the 1975 Golden State Warriors championship team, has passed away, according to the University of Kansas.

Bridges was an undersized power forward at 6’6″ but he was a beast on the boards who averaged 11.9 rebounds a game for his career and more than 13 a game for six straight years at the peak of his career. That 11.9 per game average is still 27th all-time in NBA history.

A New Mexico native, Bridges was a three-time All-Star (all as a member of the Hawks), two-time All-NBA Defensive team, and was part of the 1975 Warriors title team. Besides the Hawks (St. Louis and Atlanta) and Warriors, Bridges played for the Sixers and Lakers.

Our thoughts are with his family and friends.

Kevin Love names NBA players he thinks could play in NFL


The majority of guys in the NBA are not built for the NFL. Blake Griffin the tight end makes a huge target for a free safety to line up. Kevin Durant is a little thin. Carmelo Anthony? Come on now.

But there are a few guys who might be able to, and on his show Dan Patrick asks Kevin Love about it today (see the video above). Then DP tries to take the obvious call of LeBron James off the table.

Nate Robinson as a DB? He’s athletic enough but at his height he would be a target for tall receivers. I like Dan Patrick’s suggestion of Russell Westbrook the free safety — he is certainly athletic enough.

Love also picked himself as a QB. Um, no. I’m not sure his outlet passing skills translate.